summitlures

how to make a lipless swimbait?

36 posts in this topic

For a three piece lure, I'd think in terms of 2/1/1, starting with the head section, not counting whatever you're using for a tail.
If you're thinking four piece, 2/1/1/1, but I don't know how you're going to get all your hardware into four little pieces like that.
I look forward to hearing about, and, hopefully, seeing whatever you wind up making.
Good luck. Edited by mark poulson

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Mark the lure off into four equal sections. The head is 2 sections, the other two are one each. The tail, if you're using a plastic tail or something else, shouldn't be counted in dividing the lure, only the woodens sections.
If you're making a wooden tail section, I'd just make it the third section.
Where are you hanging your hooks, and what kind of tail are you planning to use, if any.

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oh, I think I'll use a plastic tail, but i might cut it out of balsa wood, and would it work if it was a wake bait? Edited by summitlures

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Heres a 4 piece, 4-1/2" shad i just finished, I only had to weight the first 2 sections. 1-1/2, 1 ,1, 1
[IMG]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v603/r33s33/stuff/4Shad.jpg[/IMG] Edited by carpholeo

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Balsa is a very soft wood. I don't think it would be my choice of wood for a jointed swim bait. I have a 6" four piece pine lure sitting on my work bench that I haven't finished yet, because the wood is so buoyant I will have to add a ton of ballast to get it to float right, and there's just not enough room in those small sections. It was something I made, early on, to play around with the physical challenges of hinging. It was a great help in figuring things out, sort of like assembling a wooden cabinet dry first, to see what needs to go together in what order, so, when the glue has been applied, you don't forget a step and ruin all your work.
But, as I said, I probably will never finish it. Wrong wood.
I've settled on poplar. Some people use basswood, some fir, some oak, some cedar. It really depends on the actual piece of wood you have to work with, and how heavy it is. Pine can range from super light, like the easy-to-carve piece I used for that prototype, to some really heavily pitched stuff, which is heavier, and which I actually use for my surface gliders, which are one piece.
I'm sticking with poplar or fir for my jointed lures, since both woods are strong, heavy enough to require relatively minimum ballast weighting, and are still easy to shape and finish.
What ever you finally choose to use, know you probably won't get it right the first, or second, or even third time. But each attempt will get you closer, and teach you something.
Life is a journey, not a destination. Enjoy the ride.

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[quote name='carpholeo']Used to use basswood or poplar, but now I use expanded pvc.[/quote]
oh, what's expanded pvc? And nice swimbaits, they are the best I've seen. Edited by summitlures

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[quote name='mark poulson']Balsa is a very soft wood. I don't think it would be my choice of wood for a jointed swim bait. quote]
no, that's for the tail

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[quote name='summitlures']oh, where can you find expanded pvc in SD?[/quote]

SD plastics, they should still have some 1" black left. be sure to grab some free lexan from the scrap bin too.

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[quote name='summitlures']oh, this is sorta what I wnat it to look like.[/quote]
LOL, thats the same image i used for my giant trout swimmie


[IMG]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v603/r33s33/stuff/trout-N-gill.jpg[/IMG]

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man, you make swimbaits as good as jerry rago, and did you just glue the picture on to the bait? or did you use the tissue foil technique? Edited by summitlures

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I use an old typewriter paper called " eatons corrasable bond" and spray on adhesive.

You dont have to buy the whole sheet, they have a partial sheet that you can have them cut you a piece off of. Edited by carpholeo

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regular printer paper can expand if you dont totally saturate it with epoxy, I've never tried the tissue/foil thing, but I wanna try the printing on fabric backed with freezer paper technique.

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