KelpKritter

Dremel Router ?

26 posts in this topic

I have been looking for a better, more accurate way to shape the flat-sided cranks I have been cutting lately. I have been partially cutting out 4-6 cranks on longer stock and then running what I can through the router, but even this is a little sketchy and I end up doing a lot of sanding to get the edge right.

Has anyone used the Dremel Router kit or simply the bit to round off edges. If so, what were your impressions? I am thinking it would be a lot easier to control but at the same time would like to see a little bigger cut than the bit they offer.

I just finished my first six baits and would post pics, but can't seem to find my camera after my most recent vacation. When I find it I will show my work and get some feedback.

Thanks,

DaveB.

KelpKritter

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Hi Kk,

If you own a Dremel, you know how versatile it is.

The newer XP (?) model, seems more ergonomic, but it doesn't look like it would fit the standard router table Dremel offers, so I would stick with the Multipro model, it fits in the Dremel router table, or you could build your own. Ive done it in the field more than once when in a pinch.

Agreed the available router bits made by dremel have a lot to be desired, straight flute, HSS, small diameter & dull quickly.

One tip I can give is to check out the attachments available for the Rotozip.

They make a better quality line of bits (more carbide) & the 1/8 inch shafts fit the Dremel collet.

I would DEFINITELY, lower the Multipro speed to avoid a dangerous situation, as I'm sure Dremel wont recommend any other manufacturers accessories.

A laminate or trim router can use small 1/4 shaft bits, but as you may have noticed, extra care needs to be taken to avoid possible injury. There's an old woodworkers trick to better protect yourself when using a roundover bit on small parts, but it's very hard to explain.

I'll see if I can work up a pic, if I still have the jig in the shop.

Never climb mill small parts (feeding the blank with the bit rotation, always feed opposite of the bit rotation), protect yourself, have a kill switch handy, turn off the cellphone & give the tool your undivided attention.

All the best.

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I have used a dremel router table many times in the past both for rounding edges and for cutting slots.

the edge rounding isn't the most desirable as the range of bits is minimal at best. on thing I have done is used a slotting bit to cut a shallow groove around the belly of the bait. this allowed me to run my wire around the bait rather than through the middle of it.

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What I have done to round my edges I took a copper pipe cut in half and about 3" long glued sandpaper on the inside. Just put the crank in the pipe and slide it through. That way a uniform on both sides of the baits. I really like it works great for me. For steper shoulders you can bend the pipe with pliers. I also glue sandpaper on the outside of the cut pipe so i can sand with my finger a little more accurate for me. hope this helps.

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I used the router handle attachment with my dremel and made a small simple router table to knock off the edges on flat sided baits. Simple easy and no worries about my fingers.

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JMHO, if all you have is the 1/8" Dremel round over bit, don't bother - it doesn't take off enough material to be useful IMO. It's about equivalent to one pass with a Dremel sanding drum. Want a Dremel router table anyway? I got one you can have cheep!

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I use the larger "Dremel" coarse sanding drum to furnish the round backs and bellies of my wooden lures , just freehand and after eye-balling . When the rough shaping is done that way , I'd sand smooth with a sandpaper file .

"Dremel" router bits are not much suited for body shaping freehand , most likely they tend to "pull" into the wood , leaving blemishes in it .

Only use round and oval bits to shape cupped head planes on poppers or diving lures !

Greetz , diemai

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Hand held routers are knives moving at high speed. They can be really dangerous.

I've been a carpenter for over 40 years, and have used all kinds of routers. I own a dozen right now, at least.

I wouldn't dream of using a hand held router on anything as small as a lure, without some kind of a jig to hold it. Dremels don't have enough power to take a decent cut, so they have a tendency to grab and run, and when you're holding the work piece in your hand, that spells disaster.

I don't even use a router for shaping my lures.

I rough cut them on a band saw, and then rough and finish shape them on a oscillating belt sander, which has a table.

For any fine detail, like gills, I use a Dremel with a sanding wheel, like diemai. I tried the metal cutters, but they're too prone to grabbing. Or files, knives, and chisels.

Slow and safe will get me to the lake instead of the emergency room.

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For safety's sake there should not be any misunderstanding about freehand routing !

I was only talking about the small "Dremel" router bits , even some of these can also pierce your fingers a bit , when not watching out .

Certainly one should NEVER use bigger profiling router bits or any other bigger rotating tools freehand , no way , not at all :nono:!

These ones can cause real severe injuries that might lead to permanent disability of hands and/or fingers:eek: !

take care:yay: , diemai

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First off let me say thanks for the responses. Second, safety is always of utmost concern. I learned that a long time ago from my father as I would work on the lathe in the garage. I cringed a little myself when I saw the video that was posted last week with the worker cutting on the lathe with long sleeves.

With that said, let me say that the way I have the router set up now is safe as safe an be with a router. What I mean by that is the router is one of my favorite tools to work with but one I think I have the most respect for as well. It can be an extremely dangerous tool if not used with extreme care.

My goal was to find a faster cutting tool that I could run over the entire bait. Hence, the question about the Dremel. My impressions were essentially the same as those mentioned here but was curious as to other's thoughts.

Now I cut a string of baits (held together with a large amount of wood between baits) with the band saw, run most of each individual bait through the router, cut out each individual bait, knock off any edges uncut by the router with a stationary band saw, and finally sand with paper laid inside half sections of PVC pipe.

The process is fairly quick, but becomes frustrating trying to match the perfect router cuts with the freehand sanding.

Part of the fun is figuring out new solutions and what brings you enjoyment to the hobby of luremaking.

Here is one of the baits I just finished. Actually, the guy I gave it to caught a nice halibut on it during a saltwater bass tournament this past weekend.

1_100_0582.jpg[/img]

Check out the rest of the baits in the gallery

Tackleunderground Home - Luremakers Photo Gallery - Flat-sided Cranks

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Mark is right routers are a very dangerous tool, saftey is #1 when useing them. In my opinion the router is the most dangerous tool in the lure building shop. Small pieces of wood , and your fingers, around the high speed bits takes some serious saftey precautions. The blades are not the only thing dangerous things about a router, bait can be slung across the room at high speeds if not held in place properly. Smaller the bait the more dangerous it is. So always have respect for this and all tools in your shop.

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Like BJBaron, I have used the tube with garnet glued in, this is really good for finishing off curves, I have also been using this (below) for roughing down lures, for years. This is the same as the tube idea, but has a motor and really eats into Kauri Pine, balsa, and basswood - not so good on Radiata pine or Red cedar, because of the sap and raised grains (tends to vibrate/ bounce) there is a full post on it somewhere in here. Use an evaporative cooler motor - (See also Tute "Micro Through Wire Cons" for a few more pictures and discription of motor).pete

Sander3.jpg

sander2.jpg

Edited by hazmail
Add text

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:worship::worship::worship:Hazmail you are the master. I would have never thought of that one. I always like buiding tools and jigs in the shop and I welcome all tips for making life a little easier.:worship::worship::worship:

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I was working on that same idea but using an old fan motor I had lying around. I just haven't found the old belt drives the size I need yet.

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Hazmail I would love to have a 5 minute shopping spree in your shop LOL.........:lol: No Im serious.

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Pete,

I saw your sanding wheel in some previous posts and knew that was the tool I needed to have. I tried to get someone to turn a wheel on a lathe for me but they were not as willing as I had hoped they might be. What is the wheel itself made from or is it simply something you had lying around and attached to the motor. I know if I can get my hands on a tool like that I could whp out the sanding real quick.

Thanks for the input.

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Like BJBaron, I have used the tube with garnet glued in, this is really good for finishing off curves, I have also been using this (below) for roughing down lures, for years. This is the same as the tube idea, but has a motor and really eats into Kauri Pine, balsa, and basswood - not so good on Radiata pine or Red cedar, because of the sap and raised grains (tends to vibrate/ bounce) there is a full post on it somewhere in here. Use an evaporative cooler motor - (See also Tute "Micro Through Wire Cons" for a few more pictures and discription of motor).pete

Sander3.jpg

sander2.jpg

From one "Hammer Mechanic, to another, I am humbled! Way to go!:worship:

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When I was at Gene's ("Lincoyas") place in May, he knocked one out on his lathe in 5 mins (he's got all the tools), BUT, I don't have one, so I just cut a circle out of a piece of "Custom wood" or "Craft Wood" (not sure what you guys call it) 20mm thick, screwed it onto the pulleys (which is only a 'boss' for the shaft size), and made a tool rest and a cutting tool with 20mm radius from an old wood rasp - then started the motor up and turned the 20mm half circle (groove), which when finished, also balances the wheel/pulley. If you don't have wood thick enough, just glue 2 pieces of 10mm-12mm togeather. pete

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Absolutely cool idea :yes::yay:, I'm gonna go to the scrabyard of my work more frequently now during my breaktimes .

Sooner or later I'm gonna find something suitable there , I'm thinking about one of approx. 5" dia. , 1" width , turned down from aluminium .

For the chuck of my lathe-motor it should have a shaft attached(a bolt and two nuts counterscrewed)of about 1 1/2" potruding and 1/2" dia . !

This bolt shaft would run exactly centered , when mounting it first to the blank wheel and then fixing it into the chuck of a metal lathe at my work and have the shape of the wheel milled down , no problem about that !

But which type of glue exactly to use to apply the sandpaper segments and how to get them off again , when worn out:? ?

Anyway , hazmail , thanks a lot for the input , great idea !

Greetz , diemai

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Daemai- For attachment, I use contact glue - make sure you coat both surfaces and let dry before sticking. To get it off, just dab some Mineral Turpentine (turps) on to the surface of the garnet paper, it will soak through and then it's just a matter of peeling it off. pete

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Thanks , Pete

I guess , contact glue is ordinary allround glue , not really any special purpose glue , don't have any other translation for it .

But I'll be OK with it:yay: , thanks again :worship:, Dieter

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Dieter - it is the type that is used to glue shoe soles, rubber, Kitchen laminate to bench tops etc - don't use spray cans, it is nowhere as good (too thin). Various names here 'Kwik Grip', 'Contact Cement', 'Contact Adhesive'. etc etc. pete

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Normally, Contact Cement is applied to both parts and allowed to become either dry or just slightly tacky to the touch and put together. In the case of a counter top in a kitchen, you would complete the process with a J-roller to press out any trapped air or voids.

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Thank you , guys:worship: ,

Now I know exactly , what to use , we have two great brands over here in Germany("Pattex" and "UHU") , that produce all different kinds of glue for any purpose .

greetz , Dieter

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diemai - just remember the smaller the wheel the quicker it will wear out. Rule of thumb is, the smallest CONCAVE curve your lure has, is the smallest the wheel has to be, CONVEX curves are not a problem, in fact the bigger the wheel the better for convex curves

Sandingwheelsize.jpg

Edited by hazmail
spell check

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