Jeep

Swimbait sores

11 posts in this topic

Hi guys,

This is the second thing I came across building my first swimbait.

I might be getting crazy.. but I just want to understand it so I draw something out.

swimbait_angle.gif

What happened was that I have probably made the joints too wide apart, (Fig. 1) thus allowing the sections to move too much. What happens is that the second section gets 'jammed'. This is solved by giving it a twich, but then not really how you would want it.

So I wonder what would be the best 'angle' for the sections to move. Also considering the friction on the parts on the spot where they 'meet' wich could eventually lead to damaging the topcoat (see my other post).

So I wonder what you guys think is the best angle?

Thnx

:)

Jeep

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You could always make a test bait using screw eyes, that will allow you to determine the proper gap for your particular bait.

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I have that happen, too. Typically, it happens when the lure first hits the water at the end of the cast. There is enough force to make the pieces jam.

I think it has to do with the surface of the epoxy being "sticky". Not to the touch, but to itself.

I put Megastrike on the joints to lube them, and it does the trick. Plus it gives a scent trail.

I typically only have to lube the joints once, when the lure is new, and it cures the problem.

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Although I am by no means a swimbait designer or guru, I think that if you modify your joints the pinch points or spots where the joints are hanging up will be decreased. I have attached a rudimentry diagram to further explainSwimbait.jpg

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I have never had the swimbaits I build "jam", every once in awhile there will be a slight "hitch" in the action but they don't ever stick. Are you sure the hooks aren't causing the problem? Work the lure back and forth as if it were in the water, do you see it sticking? If so correct the problem by allowing more room, take some wood off, enlarge the gap.

You don't need very much body twist to get a nice sinuous action.

By the way I like your drawings, well done.

RM

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Another thing to try is making the female part, the one with the screw eyes in it, more flat than the mating, male section that has the hinge pins. I cut the joints out at the shallow angle, about 12 1/2 degrees, and then steepen the angle on the male part at the belt sander by hand.

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Another thing to try is making the female part, the one with the screw eyes in it, more flat than the mating, male section that has the hinge pins. I cut the joints out at the shallow angle, about 12 1/2 degrees, and then steepen the angle on the male part at the belt sander by hand.

Man Mark - I had to read and re-read your post about six times to make sure you were not to pull a fast one :eek: - then again, I've had a long day of pain that started with bum tooth, an unscheduled trip to the dentist's office:teef:, that got pushed into a quick trip to an oral surgeon's office, and now, my pain medications aren't working:drool:...

I guess it's just a "ME" thing right now because your post are carefully, thoughtfully worded, detailed nuggets of knowledge that I enjoy reading and learning from - but, for a nanosecond there, I briefly thought I was reading my old biology notes:whistle:...

Good post Mark :yay:- man, it's been one of those days...:oooh:

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Bruce,

Reading you post made my teeth hurt!

I feel for you.

I'm not sure there's anything worse than a toothache, unless its an earache from a tooth that's bad.

Enjoy your meds, and don't operate power tools or heavy equipment!

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yeah bruce, toothache sucks bigtime.. get well soon!

:)

Thnx for all the tips guys! I think that my 'jam' indeed has to do with the fact that the etex is a bit 'sticky' and that my angle was too wide.

So that causes the joints to jam like in a 'lever'. What I also found out working on a new swimbait is that it is really important to pre-cut the angled cuts for your joints BEFORE you start any sculting, sanding etc. Cause now I did it after all the sculpting etc. and the result is that the joits don't work 'symmetrical' (i.e. one side moves like in fig. 1 and the other side like fig. 2). I hope it will still work fine but I'll have to test that tonight..

Well, that's another lesson learned.. :)

Jeep

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Jeep,

Don't forget that you have to round up the sharp angles of wood at the back of each section, as in blackjack's drawing. This would allow the sections to move further. Also, you do not want to cover sharp angles with epoxy, because it does not like to stay there.

Wish I knew to make drawings as nice as you do.

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Jeep,

I think you're right about cutting the joints first. Cutting the joints before shaping is much easier.

Someone on this forum suggested to me to not cut them all the way through, so there is enough wood left to hold the lure together while you shape it, and then finish the cuts after it's shaped. That's how I do it now, and it's much easier.

I use a table saw tilted to 12 1/2 degrees. That angle isn't holy. It's just the angle most wood window sills are set at, and so it stuck in my head and I used it.

I also drill both my hinge pin holes, and the relief holes that will receive the eye part of my hinges while the blank is still rectangular.

After I shape the lure, I cut the remaining wood out of the joints, sand the male part of the lure sections to increase the angle from 12 1/2 degrees to 25 or sl. I don't really know how much angle I sand them to. I sand until the angle hits the back of the relief holes for the screw eyes. Then I use the band saw, or a dove tail saw, to cut out the wood leading to the relief holes.

I try to have enough slop in the hinges in the rough, about 1/4", to leave room for my paint and epoxy, which quickly close the gap.

I don't really know how to explain it well, but some of my jointed lures are in the gallery, and the six inchers should show the hinge relief holes.

Rofish is dead on about rounding any sharp edges before you epoxy.

Be sure to ease the sharp edges in the hinge relief holes, too.

Edited by mark poulson

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