MarcDavidBaits

Getting Started

18 posts in this topic

Hey guys, I have been looking into airbrushing crankbaits and now i'm ready. I was wanting to see what was all I needed to get started and what websites to get the parts from. Also what some of the better quality airbrushes were to paint lures. Thanks for any help.

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Well, all that's needed is any kind of compressor, an airbrush and some airbrush paint. It's a "Learn While Doing" thing. There have been hundreds of threads about choosing an airbrush, compressors, and paint pros/cons here on TU. Use the search feature at the top of the page to access them.

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Youtube has some great videos on learning to use an airbrush. Learning the basics is important and practice first before spraying baits, it will save you from sanding a bait down again.

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Start out with finger paint and get a good idea of how the paint feels in your hands.

Grap that paint... RUB IT IN YOUR HANDS!! FEEL its texture!! PUT IT all over your face!! Look at yourself in a mirror and see how the paint reflects light! See the subtle shadows it casts!!! LOOK DEEP INTO YOURSELF and ask? CAN I BECOME THE LURE PAINTER I WANT TO BE COME!!

You have to become one with the paint in order to become a Masterbaiter! FEEL YOUR PASSION and PAINT YOUR WORM!!!!!! You dont just paint realism.. you live it! I like to watch BRAVEHEART BEFORE I PAINT every lure!! I get motivated by William Wallace! That speech gets me everytime.. Makes me want to paint for MY FREEDOM!!! YOU WANT TO KNOW WHAT KIND OF AIRBRUSH TO USE!!!!! You dont pick an airbrush.... THE AIRBRUSH PICKS YOU!!

Painting a lure is not about the paint.... its not about the airbursh.. its not even about the Talent!!! All you need is Patience... IMAGINATION!!!!! and ORIGINALITY!!! TO LOOK OTHERS IN THE EYE and SAY!!! NOBODY CAN PAINT A BAIT LIKE I CAN PAINT A BAIT!! THEN PICK UP THAT AIRBRUSH!!! AND PAINT THAT BAIT!!! .... man your givin me goose bumps just typing this..... I GOT TO GO PAINT!!!!

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Dixie Art & Airbrush Supplies Home Page: Airbrush and art supplies is a great site for supplies, and their prices are hard to beat also. My current brush is an Iwata Eclipse gravity feed, a popular choice around here, easy to care for, and a great all around performer. Good folks at Dixie also. If you're painting with water base acrylics you'll want a larger spray orifice than with lacquer; just a thing to pay attention to after you decide what paint you'll be using, so deciding on your paint first will help you with needle size in the brush.

The_Rookie, who is no rookie but a fine painter himself, is right about patience and imagination serving you well. Talent is nice, but a lot of practice with blending colors, some basic stencils, and a never-quit attitude will get a lot more lures nicely painted than artistic talent.

Dean

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Thanks for the help guys, I know it takes a lot of practice. I was hoping to do detailed jobs on baits. What specific kind of airbrush would be good for that? Also, any recommended paints for it? One I know of that I heard is good is the House Of Kolor paints. Thanks again.

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I'm not familiar with House of Kolor paints, so I'll talk about brushes that work with Createx, Wildlife, and Apple Barrel paints, which I have used.

I have an Iwata dual action C brush, which has an air flow control built into the trigger, and a separate paint flow control at the rear.

It's a good all around brush, but it was expensive.

I also have a Master airbrush with a MAC valve (micro air control) and a smaller tip, which I use for detail work.

The smaller tip lets me make smaller lines, and the MAC valve gives me the ability to do finer work at lower air pressure, but it has it's limitations. It doesn't spray pearls or thicker paints like opaques very well. I have to thin them with Windex if I want to use them with this gun.

Practice using stencils for details, and, if you're only going to buy one airbrush, get one with a .35 or larger tip, so you can spray all kinds of paints.

The Iwata revolution is a good all around affordable air brush that can do just about anything, once you've learned how to airbrush. And there are a lot of Iwata knockoffs, like Master, that work and are cheaper in price.

If you put an in-line air valve after your pressure regulator/water separator, you can adjust the air down on most airbrushes for fine detail work. Just be sure to thin the paint so it will still spray at low pressure.

And you're right. Practice. Nothing teaches like doing.

Edited by mark poulson

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Oh yeah!!! One more thing!!! YOU CANT JUST LISTEN TO JIMMY!!!! YOU GOT HEAR JIMMY!!!
I HEAR YEAH TATER!!!!

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I HEAR YEAH TATER!!!!

Dude,

When you've got the head phones on, but they're not plugged in, and you can still HEAR Jimmy, it's time to open a window.:D

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Heres one I was thinking on getting, I finallly narrowed it down,

MASTER Model G46 Dual Action.

What do yall think?

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Looks like the perfect brush to start with, and one that will do everything you'll probably ever want to do.

It has a .3 tip to spray thicker paints without too much thinning, MAC valve for easy adjustment, Teflon seals so you can spray lacquers and automotive paints, and a good cup size so you don't spill your paint (too often).

Just take your time reassembling it the first few times you clean it. The needles are very easy to bend (that's true on any brush), and the threads can be rough when they're new. So go slow.

And have fun.

A good rule of thumb is to thin your paint with Windex until it's as runny as milk, or a little more so.

With that .3 tip, you can probably spray pearls and opaques straight, but it is easier to thin them a little, and do a couple of thin coats, instead of one thicker coat which may not dry as fast or completely. Two thin coats is really better than one thick one anyway.

Use a hair dryer to dry each coat, and clean the brush with Windex between colors, and you should be good to go.

And it has Teflon seals, so, if you do clog it up, you can run some acetone (my best friend) through it, or even soak the tip in acetone for a little, and then clean it all up.

Other than bending the needle, which usually happens when the brush is dropped without the tip on it, or by jamming it back in crooked when you're reassembling it, or stripping the threads when you go too fast in reassembly, having the tip and needle clog with paint is the most serious problem you'll encounter, and it's totally fixable by cleaning.

I have a Master with the .2 tip, and I did find that the needle had a slight bur on the tip, which I removed with some 600 wet and dry sand paper, very gently.

So good luck, and have at it!

Edited by mark poulson

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