.dsaavedra.

bluegill swimbait

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here is a small swimbait i modeled after a Giron:

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since i took the photo, i have made the line tie and hook hanger, epoxied in all the hardware, poured lead in the belly for weight, and sealed the lure. tomorrow morning i will test the lure in the bathtub to see if its got some good action.

Edited by Spike-A-Pike
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HMMMMMM.....

i've always posted photos on here from photobucket and never had any problems. this one isnt any bigger than any of the other photos i've posted...wonder why it got remove. oh well, i'll have to go work on it.

well i just tested this lure out in the bath tub and it doesnt swim cry.gif

BUT!

it still has CRAZY action. the lure weighs about 3/4oz (definitley doesnt need any heavy gear) slowly sinks, and when it reaches the bottom, it sits upright on its hooks! on a straight retrieve, nothing happens, but give it a tiny twitch and it shoots off to one direction and bends at the joint. give it a series of twitches and it just dances all over the place. it walks the dog pretty good. i think this bait is gonna be killer for bed fish especially.

this bait was very easy to make. it would only take me about 3 days to make one, and it wouldnt be too hard to make 3 at a time...

maybe i could make these for production wink.gif

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@ DSV

Hard to recognize on your picture(the flash reflection's disturbin') , but it seems , that the tow eye is located just a little fraction underneath the very point of the head of lure :?.

The front section of your lure is also of a symetrical shape !

After my personal theory the head of a swimbait and the location of the tow eye have to be furnished in a way , that the oncoming current on retrieve would be stronger either on the top ,-OR bottom portion relating to line tie position :?.

This uneven pressure on one of the two portions creates a kinda lever around the tow eye and causes the lure to swim back in the typical "snake-like" pattern:? .

If you still want to alter the action now , you should move the tow eye a bit down the chin or up the nose of the lure , so then it probably would feature this typical swimbait action .

Or you might as well set in a smaller lip at almost 90

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well diemai,

you are a very good guesser. at the time that photograph was taken, there was no line tie on the bait. but since then, i did add a linetie, and it is right on the tip of the nose!

i never thought about moving the position of the line tie before :?

it is already epoxied in, and i dont know how i would go about moving it.

maybe i won't move this one, but i'll make another bait with the line tie below the chin.

good thinking diemai!:)

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Hahahaha , didn't even notice , that there also were no hook eyes on that pictured lure :huh::huh::lol:!

I always test my lures with temporary rigged sceweyes and hardware in my bathtube , to prevent water sepage at this stage , I'd apply a topcoat of acrylic clear paint on the wood before(later sand it a little rough prior to priming) .

By this bath tube testing I can determine about the performance of the lure , wether to shave its lip and where and how many weights to add , etc. !

I know , that this means a lot of extra work effort , but most likely it saves me from disappointment on the finished product :yes:.

I'd only leave out this test , if I make several lures of the same model , also of the same wood , since I can expect them to run in about the same manner .

If it should happen to have to change the position of an eyescrew , I'd close the old hole with a toothpick .

I'd just apply some epoxy or waterproof wood glue onto it and gently hammer it down the hole and break the potruding part off :wink:.

Sand smooth after curing !

I guess , you could still twist out an epoxied screw eye with bigger pliers and quite a bit of force , I haven't done it before , only on eyes set it with superglue , no problems about that !

But screw eyes of brass might break , they don't stand too much twisting force:yes: !

I would leave the lure , like it is , your described "twitching" action sounds promising !

Good Luck:yay: , Dieter

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You can easily still move the screw eye..just twist it loose and move it. Once you find the location that works best fill in the old ones with wood filler or bondo. I would guess you will get more movement by adding another joint than you will be moving the tow point. Cut the tail piece in half and add in another joint making it a 3-piece lure.

jed

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im leaving this one the way it is. i like it how it is.

and i didnt use screw eyes, i used twisted ss wire, so im not really sure how to get that out.

also, my dad gave me a pretty good suggestion (very good for someone who doesnt even make tackle!)

he suggested that i taper the rear end of the front piece so that it is the thinnest part of the bait. right now, everything is the same thickness, but he thinks that by tapering the front piece right in front of the joint, the water will strike the joint more, making the tail piece move. seems very reasonable to me!

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well i put the epoxy on and everything was going fine until about halfway through the tail piece and then i dropped the bait on my arm! now i have a bunch of epoxy on my arm that won't come off, and the finish is kind of rough on one side of the bait. i did my best to smooth it out, but it is still a little bit rough.

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well i put the epoxy on and everything was going fine until about halfway through the tail piece and then i dropped the bait on my arm! now i have a bunch of epoxy on my arm that won't come off, and the finish is kind of rough on one side of the bait. i did my best to smooth it out, but it is still a little bit rough.

Been there, done that. :eek:

Let the epoxy set and cure on both the lure and your arm.

Then lightly sand the rough epoxy, to smooth it, but not enough to go through into the paint, and recoat.

The stuff on your arm will come off by itself due to the oils and sweat in your skin. Or you can peel it, and all the hair under it off. Ouch! :censored:

Weighting a two piece lure so it swims is tricky.

I weight the rear of the front section, which I make longer than the rear section, in a 3/2 ratio. The rear weighting makes the head unstable, because the back of the head wants to keep moving straight while the front moves to one side or the other as water passes over it. I only weight the front of the rear section, or not at all if it's a floater.

I haven't had good success with two piece lures except as twitch baits.

The Giron doesn't have a radical swimming action. It just kind of sways from side to side.

And the Shell Cracker, a two piece surface lure by Black Dog, the same guy who invented the Lunker Punker, also swims with a very gentle action, and is more of a twitch bait.

I toyed with the idea of reversing the angle on the joints, so the V of the rear section would catch the water and start the rear wiggling, but I moved on into three and four piece lures instead.

They are much easier get to swim.

If you like the lure, but want more action, you might try adding a bill.

A wake bait bill might give it more action. The water trapped by the shallow bill takes turns dumping off one side and then the other, causing the head to shake, and wiggling the tail.

But if you like the action as it is, recoat it and go fishing! :)

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the epoxy on my arm is dry to the touch now. it should wear off soon.

i just checked on the lure and after it had been hanging a few minutes, the roughness kinda smoothed itself out. now there are just a few ripples in the finish.

as long as the epoxy still covers the eitire lure (so no water gets in) i am fine with it. ripply clear coat really doesnt bother me as long as its functional ;)

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Sorry about that little mess happened , but the fish won't care;) !

Talking about two section baits I've thought , that this one might be of interest :

It is a small bait , that must have come out well over fifteen years ago over here in Europe .

The lure is named "Jack Rapid" and made in Denmark .

So far I only knew it by a pic and the describtion in the English book "Encyclopaedia Of Lures" , copyrighted in 1993(check pic of text) .

Last year I was lucky enough to finally find one at a fleamarket and , no question , I have bought it !

Its action is never as pronounced like a three section lure , its frequency of "S"-moves is lower as well .

It seems to have no added weights , it only balances itself by the density of its material and the weight of the belly hook .

Greetz , diemai

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Interesting. I see it has a metal hinge pin. I wonder what kind of plastic it is made from?

I have some older Bass Pro Shop jointed two piece minnow lures that swim well. They are 6" long, thin, floaters, with a shallow diving bill. They go down about 3' on the retrieve.

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Like Mark said, the first section should be longest section and weight should be as far to the rear of that section as you can get it. It will also help to get a swimming action if you put the line tie farther up on the top of the bait.

David

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@ DSV

There are no flaws to be seen on your new bait , just drops of water :)!

It just looks nice , well done job:yay: !

No bass there inside that garden fountain , aye:lol: ??

keep on carvin' , Dieter

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