nrd123

microwave motor lure turner?

27 posts in this topic

Hello everyone, this is my first post, and I had a question about making a lure turner. I know most people use a motor from a rotisserie(sp?) oven but I did'ent want to spend 20$ just to get the motor out of it and have a motor that I got from a microwave for free and was wondering how many volts to run through it to get it to turn.

Thanks

Nrd123

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good question. I recently took a microwave apart and the motor power was supplied from a transformer. Hopefully, you still have the microwave shell. If so, you need to extract the transformer and use that.

The problem here is that there is no standard construction of microwave motors. If there is/was a transformer, then the motor is almost certainly a DC motor and you could start off with 12V or better still, extract the transformer and use that. If no transformer is present, then the motor could be using mains AC voltage.

Is there any text information on the motor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks,

I might still be able to get the transformer if you can tell me what it looks like so I know what I'm looking for, but anyway on the motor it says.

ssm-16hr

6549w1s013d

ac120v 2.8W

60Hz

6r.p.m class F

see the ac120v made me think that I must solder some wires to it and plug it into the wall which I would not want to do.(120v through some nearly exposed wires is not good)

The microwave was made by maytag if that helps.

Nrd123

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That tells me that there is no transformer involved. The motor runs directly from the mains (120V 60Hz). The 2.8W is the power rating of the motor, which is quite small in comparison with say a hair dryer running 600W, but that includes the heater. Sorry, I rambling.

It is always a bit scary wiring up to the mains, but you have no choice. The plug should be a low fuse value, say 3amp (I don't know about US plugs, but UK plugs carry a fuse), a protection fuse should be involved somewhere in the circuit.

Because you don't know the condition of the motor, make sure you know where the circuit breaker board is and have a torch at your side, before switching on for the first time.

I would wait a couple of hours before trying, to see if anyone else on TU has anything to say on the subject. I am an engineer with a little electronics background, NOT an electrician.

Please post the results of your endeavours and good luck with it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with Vman's general assessment; the motor can be wire directly to a plug. The only thing that you may want to add to the basic design would be an on/off switch; that way, with switch turned off, you can plug it in with relative safety and minimum risk when turning it on. If there are wires still on the motor, you need only strip the insulation back enough to connect the motor to your plug OR switch & plug and use wire nuts and electric tape. The more thought and effort you put into your design and build, the safer and more durable the finished product will be.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have wired a few of these, and know little about 240AC (or 110AC there - white man magic) - just follow your normal wiring colours for active/ neutral and earth, and attach a wall plug. They are a quite durable and tourkey motor despite their low wattage (2.8W). I have used a 2.4 and 5 RPM motor, the 5 does a good job, and 6 RPM would be o.K, but would make it hard to chase when placing the lures on the wheel - the larger the wheel diameter, the easier to attach lures while spinning, although it would have a greater "tip speed". pete

Edited by hazmail

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I third that assessment. Though instead of wire nuts and epectrical tape, I'd use butt connectors........seems a little safer to me and definitely looks cleaner. Just make damn sure your crimp will hiold, then tape each wire individually. And just in case, the first time you plug it in, do it out in the yard with an extension cord, that way if it's no good you won't burn down your house. It's pretty straightforward and easy though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the help everyone. If I decide to use this motor I will post back the results.

Thanks again

Nrd123

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With all your questions being asked and your concern for safety, I would let someone with an electrical background do the work. You could burn your house down. Or you could be breaking laws depending on where you live. My :twocents:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i'd say just spend the 20 bucks if all you want is a lure turner. if your looking for a learning experience, then by all means, proceed.:popcorn:...

you'll be in it at least 20 bucks labor not to mention anything you need. even if you have it, it costed something at some time or other. good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

only just seen this thread here's an early version of my lure turner powered by a microwave motor it now holds 12 baits and has a moveable disc so i can set it for different size bait's,the motor has been going strong for over 2 years with no problem's

lures156.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I need to build one of the contraptions. I've seen quite a few you folks have built. In your opinion: Which one is better; the lures attached by the ends as the one pictured in the previous post or the ones attached by the nose/tail?? Probably a personal preference thing, but I was curious.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thanks everyone especially for the link. I have not got around to make my turner yet, but plan to soon.

nrd123

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Click on this link to get a 5 RPM 115volt AC motor. It does not need a Transformer and comes with the electrical cord.

Burden Sales Surplus Center Item Detail

Neptune

*

Thanks for the link Neptune. Is there any way you can tell/show us how that might work? I'm no electronics whiz, so it all looks like a pile of metal and wires to me. :lol:

Also, going back to the microwave motor- does anyone know how I could make this thing work?....

Amazon.com: NEW 120V Microwave Synchronous Synch Turntable Motor 5-6 rpm 2.5/2W: Kitchen & Dining

Thank you!

Edited by TightLinez

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

TightLinez,

If you wait a day or so, I will post information regarding the details of both motors in your latest post.(Sunday 11:46 A.M. Jan.25)

The Motor assembly at Burden Sales Surplus Center Item Detail

is the best buy, because it is less expensive, plus you get the line cord an other parts that you will need.

Neptune

*

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
TightLinez,

If you wait a day or so, I will post information regarding the details of both motors in your latest post.(Sunday 11:46 A.M. Jan.25)

The Motor assembly at Burden Sales Surplus Center Item Detail

is the best buy, because it is less expensive, plus you get the line cord an other parts that you will need.

Neptune

*

Sounds great Neptune. I appreciate the help. Right now I have a 1rpm rotisserie motor, but it's too slow for my liking.

Thank you. :yay:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All American Roller Guides - Sprial, Stainless Steel Roller GuidesTightLine

Here you go:

A%20Surplus%20Motor.jpg

The reason for over lapping the wires is to offset the splices so that they are at different locations and therefore can not touch each other. You can solder the splices or twist them tightly together. Then wrap each splice with electrical tape, then tape the two splices together.

This same information can be used with the $9.00 motor which you made referenced to. But with that motor you would have to buy the Power Cord and switch. You would be way ahead using the above motor which only cost $4.00 for everything in the photo.

Check out my Neptune Spiral/Acid Roller Guides at this link:

All American Roller Guides - Sprial, Stainless Steel Roller Guides

Then click on these buttons:

Specifications | Advantages | Colors | Pricing | Catches

Neptune

*

Edited by Neptune

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can buy the motor ready to go @Hagens for $12.95

Constructed of high density polypropylene, this

unit is designed to clamp onto the wire form end of

plugs. The clamp fits into the pre-drilled holes on

the unit for painting or detail work, and then fits

into the drying motor, where it is gently turned to

assure a non-drip finish. Each table measures 24

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Burden Sales Surplus Center Item Detail $1.89

At this price I wonder if this would work. With a pully you might make it tuen a bit faster. It loos set up for continious duty plus 110v.

They also have one that you could step down from 30 rmp

http://www.surpluscenter.com/item.asp?UID=2009020919563273&item=10-1671&catname=electric $3.49

Which would be better?

What do you guys think?

I also think its www.hagensfish.com

Edited by speedbuggy
update

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now