excaliber551

Jointed lure first attempt

28 posts in this topic

Here's my first attempt at a jointed lure. Actually it's my first attempt at making a lure of any kind. It's 6-1/4 inches.

I used the screw eye pin joint technique to assemble it and to see how things fit.

I drilled out the channels where the screw eyes fit into the pin body with a dremel and make a wide side to side hole.

The lure has a nice seductive wiggle but the tail section wants to bind up on occasion regardless of the distance between the joints.

I cut the joints out to about 1/8" from being through and drilled all my holes for pins and screw eyes before shaping.

After shaping I had allot of trouble trying to cut the joints out cleanly so I went and bought a coping saw to finish the cuts. I think the coping saw will be easier to finish the cuts.

The bandsaw had a mind of it's own when I tried to finish cutting the joints.

I've learned allot so far as what to do and what not to do.

I was wondering how to seal the inside holes with the Devcon 2 ton/Den. Alcohol before I try to swim the bait.

I was thinking about using a Q-tip and applying the epoxy that way so I can make sure to remove the excess.

I'm just trying to figure out how long I want the bill to be. I cut one but it seems a bit long.

I want this to dive to around 6-10 feet and have an almost neutral bouyancy.

Any ideas you might have on any aspect of this lure would be greatly appreciated.

Lure1.jpg

Lure2.jpg

Lure3.jpg

lure4.jpg

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looks great!

"I want this to dive to around 6-10 feet and have an almost neutral bouyancy."

you sure are going for it! Jointed deep diving balsa suspender for your first lure!

Achieving neutral buoyancy will take some trial and error/practice but you may get lucky on your first try.

Nice work, looking forward to seeing the finished lure.

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It looks like you are really putting everything into this lure and the level of effort and attention to detail would suggest it's going to turn out great. I was looking at the photo and have to ask if there is much up an down play in the joints? the photos seem to that there is some present; but not if it enough to be a concern.

A very impressive lure... I can't wait to see it finished up and in the gallery.

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There is a small bit of up and down play. I'm not sure how to limit the up and down play with out a crimp of some kind and a stop but I'm so new to this I haven't a clue how to do it. I saw the beads but they would have to be really small to fit in the hole but have a larger diameter hole for the nail.

I hope it's not a factor.

"Jointed deep diving balsa suspender for your first lure!"

Yeah I know. I'm sure I'm biting off more than I can chew for a first attempt.

After looking at all your nice lures here I thought I'd jump right into the deep end instead of wading in. I'm sealing it right now and later I'll be installing the screw eyes and pins. Thanks for all the nice comments.

I'll report in once I get it in the water.

Edited by excaliber551

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This is cool , I'm eager to see and hear about your progress:yes::yay: !

Greetz , diemai

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There is a small bit of up and down play. I'm not sure how to limit the up and down play with out a crimp of some kind and a stop but I'm so new to this I haven't a clue how to do it. I saw the beads but they would have to be really small to fit in the hole but have a larger diameter hole for the nail.

I hope it's not a factor.

I don't craft hard baits and I'm certainly no expert on the subject. Something just catch my eye when I was looking at your photos. I'm just thinking out loud (so to speak) and wondering if your hitch in your swim bait could be from buoyancy in the tail combined with the left/right swim action. Does it feel smooth when you articulate the joints in your hands? No hitches then...

It could be something that just needs a small tweak - keep with it.

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The up and down play has to do with how big the joint slots are. Just bend the eye screws up or down so it is closer to the wood and it it will correct the problem. Very easy fix... you could also shim it but much more effort for little to no gain.... Also just a question and i could be asleep when i read this but did you think about the balsa being really soft and on balsa crankbaits you have to do THROUGH WIRE CONSTRUCTION so that the bass will not destroy the lure. And that is for a crank. You are targeting larger fish ad i would give some thought to connecting all the pieces unless it is just a show piece.

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Thanks for the tip on bending the screw eyes up. I already have an issue with too much epoxy buildup in the holes so I am going to have to use the dremel and clean them out a bit. That issue right already has me rethinking my connection method.

I really like the ease of using the pins for the joint so I'm going to have to see what it takes to alter the design a bit.

I'm just trying to get my prototypes made with Balsa since it's so much easier to shape. I will be going to some other material that will enable me to produce baits from a mold eventually. At least that's the plan. I'd rather spend my time doing the assembly and painting.

I'm going to fish a few of these and see if they hold up. I'm going to drill and epoxy in hand twisted screw eyes and a line tie along with the joint hardware. We'll see if they hold up or not.

I don't plan on using these for Big bass. I don't live in So. Cal any more but I do miss the bass fishing. I like to fish big worms myself.

Eventually I'm hoping these will be tough enough to target some nice bass. I'll be targeting Big Trout with them.

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Here's an update. I finally have this lure assembled, poured my tail and I took it to the tub for a swim with no hardware on it. I was surprised how buoyant this lure is. I had to play around with weight but I think I found what it wants.

I need to rework my master for my tails and come up with a better way to attach the tail to the body. It wants to twist a bit as it's swimming.

I'm going to mess around some more with the weights and then build another.

What kind of weights are you guys using to put into the bodies? Are they readily available or are you making your own? Here's a quick little video of it in the tub.

Let me know what you guys think so far.

th_swimbaittanktest1.jpg

Edited by excaliber551

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Looks great!!!

Can we see a pic with the tail? Other than that I think you need a bigger tub....or maybe just a lake :)

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That thing really swims! I thought the tank was fine, just big enough. Vid was good too.

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That lure just swims great , very pronounced "snake-like" action :yay:!

Since I don't have much experience with swimbaits , I am now wondering , what is the cause for this superbe action , is it the four sections or the lip or both perfectly corresponding one another(only made one swimbait so far without lip/three sections):?.

Also the plastic tail does its share to the general appearance , that's obvious .

great lure :yay:, greetz , diemai

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It looks as though it swims exactly as one would hope it would, given its design; fantastic! I think you're on your way to one great life-like and versatile lure!!! :yay:

If you're stuck for space on the amount of ballast you need in the front section of the lure, you might consider using some tungsten weights instead of lead. That tip courtesy of David Sullivan, TU's captsully 18.

(Diemai) Since I don't have much experience with swimbaits , I am now wondering , what is the cause for this superbe action , is it the four sections or the lip or both perfectly corresponding one another(only made one swimbait so far without lip/three sections)
:?.

Diemai, in a word, Yes! :)

Dean

Edited by Dean McClain

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excaliber551,

That's a superb action. Congrats.

Allow me to suggest you something: tie the line to a small flexible stick (like the top of a strong fishing pole). You will have a much better control on the lure, and also in the video we will see more of the lure and less of you.

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Thanks for the kind words guys. I still have a ways to go before I get this lure exactly like I want it.

rofish, Pay no attention to the man behind the screen. Next time it will be in the pond.

I'll post a follow up video when I get the lure the way I want just prior to paint.

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have you played with tail size? I think that may be causing a bit of the twist you were talking about.

Other than that...the bait looks awesome and I cant wait to see a vid in the pond!!

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I made the tail the same size of the photo I used as a reference. I wanted the tail to really kick from side to side. Once I redesign the tail connection and it holds the tail in place better I'll be able to tell for sure what is causing the tail to twist. I just melted some really soft worms and the actual plastic I use will be much stiffer.

You could be right. The tail might be too big. It might need to be downsized and lighter.

I'm already working on remaking the masters and I'll make one just a bit smaller.

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Man, that lure looks great! Everything about it works. Good job.

I can't wait to see it painted and finished!

As for weighting, you've already determined how much and where.

Try drilling ballast holes just behind the front hook hanger, and as close as possible to the rear hanger, without weakening either.

It looks like you used screw eyes, and are tight for space on the rear hanger.

I would consider removing the screw eye and weighting the hanger itself. That way, you can get the ballast exactly where you have it now.

I learned a tip early on here to use weighted hook hangers, since all of my lures need some weight anyway, and the location of the hook hangers seemed to be the best place for the initial weight.

There used to be an outfit that sold weighed hangers, but they don't return my calls anymore, so I make my own, again with a tip I learned here.

I push a sst cotter pin through an 1/8oz egg sinker, and then bend the ends out 90 degrees and clip them off even with the outside diameter of the sinker. That way, I can slowly push the entire setup into a 5/16" hole that's half filled with D2T 30 minute epoxy, and the epoxy pushes back up past the weight, and also up through the pin hole.

If the 1/8oz weight is too much, you can pinch the split shot around the shank of the cotter pin, and then bend it and cut it off.

I bet, if your screw eyes are long enough, you could do the same thing with screw eyes instead of cotter pins.

I found it's an easy way to start the weighting process on jointed wooden lures, and makes weighting smaller sections easier.

After that, I float test just like you with #5 split shots pinched onto the trebles until I get the floatation I want, and drill and set them in epoxy, too.

Hope this helps.

Edited by mark poulson

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Would just like to add my :twocents:. Man, you have a wonderful bait there! When you make a swimbait that starts that snake action as quickly as yours, you have done exceptionally well.

As Mark stated, you do want the weight as far to the rear of the front section as possible. I think you have found the spot by hanging your weights on the hook. If you use an egg sinker or tungsten (thanks for the mention Dean) you can do one of three things. 1) you can use cotter pins as Mark suggested, 2) you can drill out the center of lead weight so that it will fill with epoxy and then insert screw eyes, 3) same as 2 only use the twisted wire. The epoxy (and I would strongly suggest D2T and not 5 min.) WILL hold the eyes.

Excellent work. I look forward to seeing the final version ala paint and video in the pond (hopefully with a BIG bass attacking it). :drool:

David

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e551,

I made a coil of spinnerbait sst wire, about 3/8" diameter and 3/4" long, by winding it around a 5/16" diameter lag screw I locked in a vise. I used channel locks to hold the starting end of the wire and just used my hand to wrap the wire around the lag.

I drill a 3/8" hole in the back of the rear section, again about 3/8" deep, and epoxy in the coil with D2T 30. Then I "screw" on my tail. Like a large version of the Hitch Hiker.

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