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Thinning Epoxy with Fingernail Polish Remover

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hey guys, i was wondering if i could thin epoxy with fingernail polish remover?

i use this stuff to get the epoxy off my paintbrush when i'm done, so i guess it could work as a thinner...

should i use fingernail polish remover with acetone or without acetone?

also, if the remover has a purple hue to it, will that show in the clear coat?

thanks.

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Just get Acetone. The nail polish remover has extra stuff in it that could affect the cure of the epoxy even more than acetone alone will. I'd imagine a purp[le hue would show up in the final coat. Just get acetone.

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:eek:

that sucks, i dont have denatured alcohol OR just plain acetone! i really didnt want to have to go out and buy some stuff just for this.

any other solvents that will work?

what about rubbing alcohol? something makes me think that won't work.

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Don't even go there. LOL There's so many remover formulations, god knows what you're thinning it with. some are even water-based now. As for the denatured alcohol guys. You're playing with fire. Virgin DNA will work, but it's surely not the best reducer. It could cause clouding and it will retain moisture rather well. Can lead to some ugly clear jobs in high humidity or if you're not dilligent in keeping it closed. The best reducer for almost any epoxy is a 3:1 mix of MIBK(methyl isobutyl ketone) and toluene. You'll get the fastest reduction and a nice glass finish. Acetone is way too fast and generally takes too much to get the viscosity you need. I'm still puzzled why so many people want to reduce their epoxy though. I can see for spraying, but for brushing, I use 100% solid epoxy and it flows out just beautifully. Trying to do a quickie job with multiple coats of quick set epoxy just isn't time efficient. 1 coat of 100%(3 minutes per lure) and I'm done. Put then on the turner for 3 hours and they're set-up, ready to use or ship tomorrow.

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What's wrong with Denatured alcohol (besides being toxic). I use that sometimes and have also used acetone. I used D2T for a long time without thinning, but the bigger the baits got I just had to thin to get the stuff not to get hard on me, no matter how fast I went. You can heat a little to bring it back to life but I think that just speeds up the curing process. I think it really depends on your location, here in Fl is like 100 degrees with 100% humidity. The D2T sets up super quick. Hence my need to thin a little.

Don't even go there. LOL There's so many remover formulations, god knows what you're thinning it with. some are even water-based now. As for the denatured alcohol guys. You're playing with fire. Virgin DNA will work, but it's surely not the best reducer. It could cause clouding and it will retain moisture rather well. Can lead to some ugly clear jobs in high humidity or if you're not dilligent in keeping it closed. The best reducer for almost any epoxy is a 3:1 mix of MIBK(methyl isobutyl ketone) and toluene. You'll get the fastest reduction and a nice glass finish. Acetone is way too fast and generally takes too much to get the viscosity you need. I'm still puzzled why so many people want to reduce their epoxy though. I can see for spraying, but for brushing, I use 100% solid epoxy and it flows out just beautifully. Trying to do a quickie job with multiple coats of quick set epoxy just isn't time efficient. 1 coat of 100%(3 minutes per lure) and I'm done. Put then on the turner for 3 hours and they're set-up, ready to use or ship tomorrow.

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Many of us are hobbiests with limited access (maybe not a bad thing) to special solvents and little if any knowledge about coatings chemistry. I apprecaite hearing comments from an expert. I've used acetone, virgin lacquer thinner, non-virgin LT and denatured alcohol. DA has worked best. Very thin, it makes a very good waterproofer. In the heat of summer when straight epoxy becomes unbrushable in about 5 mins, a little DA extends the work time but cures about as fast as unthinned epoxy. I haven't noticed any clouding.

:) What shelf at Home Depot do they store the MIBK/Tolulene?

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What's wrong with Denatured alcohol (besides being toxic). I use that sometimes and have also used acetone. I used D2T for a long time without thinning, but the bigger the baits got I just had to thin to get the stuff not to get hard on me, no matter how fast I went. You can heat a little to bring it back to life but I think that just speeds up the curing process. I think it really depends on your location, here in Fl is like 100 degrees with 100% humidity. The D2T sets up super quick. Hence my need to thin a little.

Alcohol contains oxygen that will rob some epoxy's reaction and give you an undercured film. And it absorbs moisture, resulting in the same. In most epoxy sytems, it takes too much to get the viscosity you need. If you're using 100% solid epoxy and it takes more than 10% reduction to get the brushability, you're using the wrong reducer. Or wrong epoxy ;)

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Many of us are hobbiests with limited access (maybe not a bad thing) to special solvents and little if any knowledge about coatings chemistry. I apprecaite hearing comments from an expert. I've used acetone, virgin lacquer thinner, non-virgin LT and denatured alcohol. DA has worked best. Very thin, it makes a very good waterproofer. In the heat of summer when straight epoxy becomes unbrushable in about 5 mins, a little DA extends the work time but cures about as fast as unthinned epoxy. I haven't noticed any clouding.

:) What shelf at Home Depot do they store the MIBK/Tolulene?

ACO hardware has both around here. And any auto refinish supplier carries them. Not raggin ya, just trying to help.

The biggest mistake I see here is patience! If you have a turner, you need an epoxy that takes about 3 hours to cure. 30 minute epoxy is too much of a pain in the rear. Use a 100% solid, slow cure epoxy, with one coat, and you'll be amazed at how easy it can be.

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OOOO no here it comes!!!!! No not that! Please any thing but that!

Downriver Tackle what do you think the best brand epoxy or urathane for the application? I see that I should use slow cure (3 hours).

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Thanks for the info Downriver. I really hate to get another epoxy post going here but I always appreciate the knowledge of those who have already tinkered around with this stuff. Saves us alot of time and money.

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This is good info and I really want to know what would be a good place for me to start finding another good clear coat. I use 2-ton now and like it but I would like a longer cure at times. Maybe to coat 10 lures at a time. I'm only good enough to get 4 or 5 in. I live high in the mountains (5700 ft above sea level)and its dry, moisture in the air is not a problem. Well unless you want it there. I guess Live in the mountain desert. ANYWAYS looking for guidance.

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Hi

I have played with thinning epoxy in the past. At the end of the day I say leave well alone, as far as I can see there is no epoxy made that says on the package 'thin with'. If D2T is too heavy try Etex which is a lighter epoxy that way you are safe in the knowledge you are not compromising the integrity of the product in any way. If you thin you cannot expect the product to behave in an identical way to unthinned even if the effects are unseen. Kelly, Etex I believe would meet with your requirements.

Edited by philB

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OOOO no here it comes!!!!! No not that! Please any thing but that!

Downriver Tackle what do you think the best brand epoxy or urathane for the application? I see that I should use slow cure (3 hours).

Available off the shelf?......................Flexcoat

Edited by Downriver Tackle

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Thanks philb I see Etex posted a lot. Might have to try it. Downriver on the flex coat I thought that yellowed over time? Are you talking about the rod finish or is there another mix to use?

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Thanks philb I see Etex posted a lot. Might have to try it. Downriver on the flex coat I thought that yellowed over time? Are you talking about the rod finish or is there another mix to use?

I can't give away all my secrets. :whistle:

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OOOOOH? ouch! I think you have plenty of secrets. Like your fishing hole or where you skinny dip.:)

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OOOOOH? ouch! I think you have plenty of secrets. Like your fishing hole or where you skinny dip.:)

No secret where I skinny dip. My backyard, in the jacuzzi. :oooh:

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OK! OK! Thank you for your help. Still have your epoxy and your fishing hole.

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I hate to bring this up again but Devcon yellows in about 1 day. The higher the heat the faster it will yellow. No clear coat is the best, you just have to find what works for you. I do enjoy reading about all the different clear coats that everybody uses. It's a lot of very good info.

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When I first started using Etex, I called their help number from their website, and spoke with a woman who was very helpful.

I subsequent emails she said the best thing to thin Etex with was denatured alcohol.

I don't thin it myself, but that's what she said.

I've learned that, in mixing D2T, it's important to mix it thoroughly without any thinning first, let it sit for a minute to make sure all the separate chemicals have had a chance to really interact, and then coat with it. Any alcohol contamination, like on a mixing stick that's been soaking in alcohol, seems to mess up the mix. Etex is a little more forgiving.

I haven't found the need to slow down the D2T. I just mix enough to do one or two lures at a time. Mixing more isn't that big a deal, and it mixes up and goes on so fast it doesn't take that much extra time.

And I only use D2T for plastic cranks, or to coat the insides of my swimbait joints, or for gluing in hardware and lips, so I don't ever need a big batch. For the big faces on my wooden swimbaits and gliders, I use Etex.

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It was said here that acetone is way too fast to thin epoxy. I agree. I do not like acetone, because it evaporates too fast, causing problems like clouding. Instead, I use a thinner desighed for "nitrocellulosic products". It says on the label that it contains toluene, acetone and buthyl acetate. I use it both for thinning epoxy and to dissolve propionate. The propionate solution would produce sometimes the clouding effect, but this is really an exception, and it happens when the air has a lot of moisture in it.

Once I made a thick propionate solution using acetone as a solvent. I dipped the lure in it, and when it cured I saw it lost some colour(it was cloudy), but the clearcoat was a perfect matte finish. I dipped a lure having several coats of normal, thin propionate solution as sealer into this thick solution of propionate and it happened again. It lost colour but the matte finish was perfect.There was a question in the past about matte finish (don't remember who's question it was), that's why I mentioned it. Then I dipped both lures in the normal thin solution of propionate+thinner and the colour and the gloss were back again.

I do not like to use the epoxy as it is, I like to thin it. I usually make crankbaits using the printing foil technique, and I noticed that unthinned epoxy would not let the foil come through. But if I used thinned epoxy, the foil shines through the image of the fish. It is clearly the thinner which makes the difference.

It was also said by TU members that some types of epoxies have already some thinner in them (off the shelf, of course). I think that this would mean that both components have some thinner.

At least some types of epoxies can be used together with thinners. Just google "epoxy thinner" and see the results. Maybe someone could explain me if such thinners are used for 2 component epoxies or just for one component.

The picture below is meant to make the difference between a lure topcoated with unthinned epoxy (the one on the top) and a lure where thinned epoxy was used as a clearcoat (the smaller one). The foil was exactly the same for both lures.

I do not have 2 pcs. of the same lure to show you the difference, but I think the picture speaks for itself, even though when you look at the real thing the difference is higher than in the picture.

I admit that if you paint your lures you do not have to use your head with such problems.

IMG_0958.jpg

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