mark poulson

Nu Lustre 55

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Mark from Swing Paints - manufacturer of Nu-Lustre-55.

We now have 3 versions available.

Nu-Lustre-55 1:1 thick high build coating

Nu-Lustre-55 (ANTI-UV) 1:1 thick high build coating with UV inhibitors to prevent yellowing. Ideal for Exterior and Marine applications.

Nu-Lustre-55 Brush-On (ANTI-UV) 2:1 coating with UV inhibitors to prevent yellowing. Ideal for Exterior and Marine applications. Brush-on formula allows for application onto Vertical surfaces.

If anyone out there wants to put together a set of instructions for application onto lures, we can include them on our web site. Any other questions, please feel free to contact me mchaimberg@swingpaints.com or post onto our online forum.

Thanks for all your support. :)

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'll try and put something together for you Mark as I have had a chance to experiment with this new formula.

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Mark,

What is the difference between the 2:1 and 1:1 anti UV coatings? I see the 2:1 states it's brushable for vertical surfaces. Is the 1:1 thick build not suitable for brushing on lures?

Mark from Swing Paints - manufacturer of Nu-Lustre-55.

We now have 3 versions available.

Nu-Lustre-55 1:1 thick high build coating

Nu-Lustre-55 (ANTI-UV) 1:1 thick high build coating with UV inhibitors to prevent yellowing. Ideal for Exterior and Marine applications.

Nu-Lustre-55 Brush-On (ANTI-UV) 2:1 coating with UV inhibitors to prevent yellowing. Ideal for Exterior and Marine applications. Brush-on formula allows for application onto Vertical surfaces.

If anyone out there wants to put together a set of instructions for application onto lures, we can include them on our web site. Any other questions, please feel free to contact me mchaimberg@swingpaints.com or post onto our online forum.

Thanks for all your support. :)

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The real advantage to this new 2:1 mixture for lure makers is how clear it sets up with little or no bubbles at all. Usually, when you use a brush to apply epoxy, you'll also end up with a zillion bubbles. You can still give it a quick sweep with a blow torch on low but once any bubbles are popped they don't seem to reappear. This is the major point that convinced me to make the switch from the original Nu-Lustre 55.

Plus it has the added UV protection so it won't yellow.

While it may not dip as long as the other formulas it does still require the use of a rotisserie to prevent it from running off unless you brush it on super thin which would then require many coats.

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Mark,

It sounds to me like your going about this all wrong. The real problem here is your lures are spending way to much time in the sun! Put them babies in the water! Thats what you made them for isnt it? I would be willing to bet $100.00 right now if you put them in the water they would not turn yellow any more. Problem solved. Oh and another cool side affect to getting them wet is that you catch fish also.:whistle: Anyways just thought I would give you some good ol Montana advice. Good luck.

Shane

P.S. This was for Mark Poulson. Just a joke not trying to take anything away from swing paints.

Edited by MTfishingrods

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While it may not dip as long as the other formulas it does still require the use of a rotisserie to prevent it from running off unless you brush it on super thin which would then require many coats.

I meant to write that it does not DRIP for as long as the other formulas not "dip".

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Snax,

I just finished my second, third, and fourth lures with the new 55, and it performed great.

I mixed up 4+ grams of it, one to one, and let it sit while I did a little D2T work on the spring tail holder on the two rat baits I made, and then coated all three baits on my wheel.

It was easy to brush on, and no bubbles.

It went on at 1:00 Saturday afternoon, and was set enough to fish with at 5:00 the next morning.

I'm curious. How much working time do you have with a two to one mix?

Also, can you buy the hardner separately, because, obviously, you're using it up twice as fast?

You can't just make up your own mix ratios. You have to follow the manufacturers recommendation. If they say 1:1 and you go 2:1, 50% of one component is unreacted.The lure will be tacky, and if not, it will yellow like crazy.

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I believe that Mark was referring to the 1:1 uv formula and not the very new 2:1 which I was fortunate enough to test before it was available to the public.

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I believe that Mark was referring to the 1:1 uv formula and not the very new 2:1 which I was fortunate enough to test before it was available to the public.

Sorry about that . somehow it took me to the 2nd page and I thought that was the latest post. Oops.

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Mark,

It sounds to me like your going about this all wrong. The real problem here is your lures are spending way to much time in the sun! Put them babies in the water! Thats what you made them for isnt it? I would be willing to bet $100.00 right now if you put them in the water they would not turn yellow any more. Problem solved. Oh and another cool side affect to getting them wet is that you catch fish also.:whistle: Anyways just thought I would give you some good ol Montana advice. Good luck.

Shane

P.S. This was for Mark Poulson. Just a joke not trying to take anything away from swing paints.

Arrrgh, you're a hard man, Shane! :D

You're right. I should catch more fish. ;)

I switch up between different lures during the day, and they all see their share of the water.

And I caught a fish on a new lure Sunday, so I was jazzed.

But I was disappointed that the silver based paint scheme that i worked so hard to make is now turning golden.

I've switched to the Nu Lustre 55 UV protected formula to stop that.

Fingers crossed.

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i do know using new lustre is very good. we have been using it for at least 5 years now. for toothy fish its the most durable we have used in clears.. we use different products for applications on metals, or plastics. on wood its great

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Guy's keep up the testing and posting on this.

Looks like The stuff is not cheep and shipping is steep as well.

It may seem expensive, but I only use 2 grams per lure per coat, and that's on 6" wooden lures, so it really goes a long way.

I just hope the shelf life is good.

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G'day... sorry to drag this one up again but aprox how many large lures (6-10inch) would you expect to cover with a 24oz pack of Nu-lustre 55. This stuff looks like it could be just the thing I'm looking for to finish my GT Poppers and Pencils.

Atm I'm using a sprayable Dupont auto clear (2 pac) which works well for me because I can add Sparkle flecks and Pearls to the first coats but it is just not tough enough as a final coat, think 30-60kg+ fish:teef:. I was wondering if I could apply Nu-lustre over the top of my existing clear coats so I could still use the pearls etc . I have a couple of Amma Bamma lures that I think are finished in Nu-lustre 55 and it is surely the finish I am after.

Cheers

Crusty

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For sure you can apply the Nu-Lustre 55 over the auto clear. Just be sure to scuff the finish before applying the Nu-Lustre for a mechanical bond.

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Thanks Snax, I wonder if it would have a chemical bond to the auto clear if applied within a 24 hour period, is it "thinners" based ?

I am looking at putting the Nu-Lustre-55 on new lures so the coat of auto clear would still be "green".

Do you think I would cover 30 lures from a 24oz pack?

Cheers

Crusty

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Crusty,

I've rushed the process like that, and had problems.

One thing that might help you understand what you face is to think about why there's a curing time for the auto clear.

It's so the solvents that are in the clear can off gas, or evaporate, completely. They're important because they are the catalysts that allow the long chain molecules to form in the clear, giving it it's strength.

If you coat anything before it's cured, you run the risk of coating over solvent that's still off gassing. That's why there's a specific curing time. The only time that you can re coat before a product is fully cured is if the second coat is the same material, and the manuf. says so on the label.

Otherwise, you're asking for trouble.

I've gotten away with quick recoats of solvent based stuff when it's a spray glitter, or pastel fixative, and I've sped the process up with a hair dryer, but that's the only time I've had success.

The auto clear solvent may interfer with the Nu Lustre, or cause a poor bond. Because auto finishes have to be strong, it may have some pretty potent solvents in it.

It's safer to let it cure, scuff sand it, and then coat it. Remember, the clear epoxy will fill in the micro scratches, so the bait will still be clear.

And, if the epoxy does cure out, but doesn't bond, you'll ruin your lure getting the epoxy off so you can recoat it. That stuff, by design, is damn near bullet proof.

Been there, done that. :censored:

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Mark

Thats exactly what I was worried about, the 2 pac clears I use now take about 2 weeks to harden fully, I know because I keep the excess from each batch in a container and can see the solvents leaching from it.

This may be a good opportunity to go back to acrylic clears for my base coats with pearls and/or sparkle fleck and then apply a good coat or two of Nu-Lustre :yay:

Does the Nu-Lustre give a strong enough finish to protect acrylics?

I would love to move away from 2 pac clears if possible ;)

By the way I love this site8)

Crusty

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I have talked to the productknowledge specialists at E-Tex and they tell me that the crystal sheen is the toughest product they make. I have been using it for quite a while and have not seen any yellowing. The amount of material on the baits don't show it, Like it would maybe on a table top with a much thicker application.

E-tex has no solvents.... I like that. Can't say that about others mentioned here...

BTW.... It's harder than D2T

Edited by 21xdc

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Crusty,

I find that both the Nu Luster and Etex, which are bar top finishes, are tougher and more flexible than D2T, which is a glue, and so needs to be much more rigid.

Both bar top finishes are designed to cover large surfaces, which are bound to expand and contract, so they are more flexible to allow for that.

In the past, when I've used D2T as a top coat on my wooden baits, any accidental rock encounters (rare and unusual as they might have been :lol:) would result in massive chips and delamination.

With the bar top finishes, incidental contact with hard surfaces results in no damage, and impact on jagged edges which do make dents through the finish and paint into the wood result in no delaminations or chipping. I am able to dry, sand, fill, touch up, and re coat the lure without having to completely remove the old epoxy, as was the case with D2T. I just scuff sand the old epoxy with 400 grit, wipe it down with denatured alcohol, and it's good to re coat.

I now use the Nu Lustre 55 because it has UV inhibiters, and I had some of my wood lures yellow when I used Etex and left them on the deck while I was fishing. I don't know if Etex carries a line of clear epoxy with UV protection.

Edited by mark poulson

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No need to thin that stuff. It's meant to be applied as is. If you MUST, use lacquer thinner, not DNA./quote]

FYI. most polymers cut with aromatic solvents can and do create a static charge while mixing ( BOOM ). most polymer recomendations are to cut with keytones or alchohols for this reason. google the types of solvents above and get great info.

4-6 drams with two drops of 99% isopropyl or acetone is a good mix for most 2 parts. i'd suggest also that you expieriment a little to get your preferences.

Edited by b1gf1sh1

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