QiKsilver

Interested in Lure Making

11 posts in this topic

Hi everyone,

I am interested in making my own lures. With winter coming in a few months I thought it might be a good idea to try making my own lures for the next season.

I fish pike mostly but also walleye and smallmouth. Next summer I want to try Musky.

So if you could point me to some "beginner" article to help me get started that would be great. I haven't found a whoe LOT of information on the internet but I am sure there is...

I know this may sound ambitious but I would like to make a pike imitation jointed bait as my first try. Something around 12-13" to hopefully get a record pike and attract large muskies.

I have a decent airbrush and my painting skills aren't bad since I've been doing scale modelling for a few years.

What are the basic equipment / products / hardware?

Sorry for my not so good english, I sure am trying hard.

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As you are just starting out, I am not going to tell you to buy half the hardware stores tool infantry. I have managed perfectly well with just a Dremel mini drill and an assortment of attachments. Doesn't have to be dremel, but do not skimp on quality, the cheap drills will not last.

Tackleunderground - Search Results

The above link is a search result on 'tools dremel'. The list of results give a comprehensive selection of articles on tools and lure construction. Read through some of these and you will find most of the information you are looking for.

Other search words that will bring information are: sealing, top coat, devcon, etex, propionate, createx, nites, acrylic.

A final warning, lure building is addictive and there is no known cure, so beware and be safe.

Good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

your at the right place to learn. Just use the search function and start soaking in the wealth of info that is here.Here is another site you can look at it has some designs and steps for lure building Lurebuilding 101.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

get a cup of coffee and read lots here in the forums. the wealth of lnowledge here is the best worldwide. theres many quiet masters here, that have been sharing thoughts for years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The information is here, just taks it in. I had never made a crankbait but in a few months I've been catching fish with my home brewed crank. I would have never done it without the help of those T.U. members who share their knowledge. Thanks guys thanks-a-million

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My first suggestion, aside from reading all you can on this site, is to buy a successful lure, similar to what you want to build, and try to copy it. I say try, because it's impossible to actually make a duplicate. And, as long as you're not planning on selling the lure, it's okay to copy. Just don't try to pass it off as your own. Give the original maker his or her due.

You'll learn more from doing, in terms of shape, weighting, joint making, and hook/lie tie position.

Just be sure you seal your wood before you wet test it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for all the replies! This forum sure is active!

I already have a dremel so that's good. I think I got all the tools to make some not too fancy ones.

Thanks for the great site (lurebuilding101). It certainly gave me some tips.

Sometimes the fastest way to learn is by actually trying and failling. I might be underestimating this... I mean it doesn't look very complicated but I'll only realise that once I've failed miserably hahaha :)

Mmmmmm I have to seal before wet testing without the paint on? Would you mind explaining why?

Thanks again for all the replies. I'll definitely read through a lot this weekend.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thank you for all the replies! This forum sure is active!

I already have a dremel so that's good. I think I got all the tools to make some not too fancy ones.

Thanks for the great site (lurebuilding101). It certainly gave me some tips.

Sometimes the fastest way to learn is by actually trying and failling. I might be underestimating this... I mean it doesn't look very complicated but I'll only realise that once I've failed miserably hahaha :)

Mmmmmm I have to seal before wet testing without the paint on? Would you mind explaining why?

Thanks again for all the replies. I'll definitely read through a lot this weekend.

You have to seal your baits so that water dosnt soak in. Once water soaks in you have to let the wood dry and it takes days for that to happen. Water will cause wood to crack and it also adds weight to your baits when it soaks in and trying to figure out weight at this time is imposiable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sometimes the fastest way to learn is by actually trying and failing

True words and in my opinion, the best way to learn. You might want to consider making your first one without paint and use it as a learning tool. Still apply the top coat and hardware (hooks et), as weight distribution is important.

I usually make the tow eye a little longer on prototypes, so that I can bend up or down and test the effect of shifting the eye position.

I might be underestimating this... I mean it doesn't look very complicated but I'll only realise that once I've failed miserably

Once again, true words. But if you've done the reading, you won't go far wrong. If it does go wrong, DO NOT THROW AWAY. This should be seen as an opportunity to learn. Post a pic and explain what happened. The answer will be forth comming.

Mmmmmm I have to seal before wet testing without the paint on? Would you mind explaining why?

I addition to the above answers, any moisture inside the bait after top coating, will be trapped. It will give poor adhesion and before long, the paint/top coat will separate (delaminate). Always keep the baits out of direct sunlight. This causes expansion and contraction of the trapped air and moisture inside, which makes things worse.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am still following the Venn approach to lure making; studying the various methods, waiting for the one moment in the future when I will actually sit and produce a bait perfect to my style of fishing.

I would recommend starting with a simple design and adding to it as your knowledge level increases - simply put, going from the known to the unknown and learning as you go. Good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now