droptine150

help with set up

10 posts in this topic

what is the best compressor/ airbrush combo? also what is the most forgiving double action airbrush for beginers to learn with. trying to get set up. what other equipment that will assist me in being a better painter.

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what is the best compressor/ airbrush combo? also what is the most forgiving double action airbrush for beginers to learn with. trying to get set up. what other equipment that will assist me in being a better painter.

For my relatively new experience, I will say I started with a less expensive air brush (which I now use mainly for transparent paints, ie: non-pearl/metallic paints) and quickly moved to a better Iwata. Now I don't have the best Iwata out there, but it is a whole lot better than many less expensive brands.

Any compressor that can deliver a good constant air flow of 45#s can be used for what I do. But add a good filter and pressure regulator to what ever you buy because you might want to spray at a very low pressure at times. The larger the tank the less you have to listen to the motor kick on an run, so in my opinion bigger is better. I started with a 2 gal and I think the current one is like 10 gallon or some where around that capacity. Tater Hog uses one that is lord, 50 gallons or so and I have seen him paint for a long time before it ever kicks on. But he also has a splitter attached with about 6 airbrushes constantly attached.

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I agree with 76gator. I would like to expand on the airbrush, tho. Get an Iwata gravity feed. It is more reliable, easier to clean, and is not all that expensive. If you opt for a cheaper airbrush, that is exactly what you will get - a cheap airbrush - that you will not be satisfied with - and may run the chance of turning you against airbrushing. In airbrushing, you get what you pay for.

David

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Check the Badger site for their Garage sale. I picked up a couple really nice brushes for less that $30 each and they work great.

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The Iwata comes with only one tip, 3.5 mm I think. Createx airbrush paints are my preference. Make sure you shake well before using.

David

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I also use Iwatas and think the Revolution B model is a great general purpose gravity feed airbrush for a very moderate price. It has a .3mm tip. Gravity feed uses less paint and is much easier to clean. Any compressor will do as long as it will develop at least 35-45 psi under constant load. That includes small tool compressors, which many guys favor due to the low price and high capacity - plus you can use it for other stuff around the house. You need a moisture filter and a pressure regulator to go with it. Yes, you can try cheap hobby paints and thin them to shoot through your airbrush. BUT you'll be happier using paint formulated for airbrushes because it has smaller paint particles and flow enhancers to prevent clogging and spray better patterns. If I had it to do over, I'd skip the hobby paint and go with airbrush paint only, for the convenience and efficiency. If you want to do details, buy some frisket material and make templates for gill slits, craw patterns, kill spots, etc. I've been painting cranks for 5 yrs and still depend on templates versus trying to do details freehand. It's just more reliable and repeatable (remember you want both sides to look the same!). Get some small netting to shoot through for scale patterns. Createx has a good standard color palette. You'll probably find you want to buy some special "fishy" colors and Smith Paint Nature's Gallery, Wasco, Translatex, etc are all good sources for "taxidermy" airbrush paint. I'd check out Dixie Art for an airbrush plus a selection of paints. Their prices are decent and shipping is free for orders over $50.

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Would that be the Revolution BR, roughly $70.00? Wanting to try my hand at some painting as well. Have a great compressor just shopping for a gun. Any feedback on their trigger models? How about a paint supplier and brand recommendation. Do you hand brush the clear coat on? I have also seen lures on a moving drying wheel as well. Thanks in advance.

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Yes, the Revolution BR. I've used one for 6 mths and like it very much. Don't know anything about trigger models but I figure they're designed for painting larger things like gas tanks, cars and motorcycle helmets. I like the BR 'cause it's 1) good quality and 2) holds the right amount of paint for doing crankbaits. If you want to paint larger stuff, you will want a brush with larger capacity.

I use Createx, Smith Wildlife and Translatex acrylic latex airbrush paints.

You brush on Devcon 2 Ton or any other brand epoxy. You can either brush or dip Dick Nite Fishermun's Lurecoat or other polyurethanes. A drying wheel is not absolutely necessary with Devcon, but is required for any other clearcoat and is a big advantage with Devcon too. Anything that rotates at 4-8 rpm is good - rotisserie motors, microwave turntable motors, or small stepping motors in that rpm range. If you're doing musky lures, a rotisserie motor has more torque.

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