Jeep

Casting Hard Baits?

11 posts in this topic

Hi All,

I'm playing around with the idea of casting hard baits with ..something.

:)

I watched some video's on youtube on how casting is done in the first place -never did it..- but I think it must be a lot of fun to do.

But... with what?

I got some advice at a local shop to use FeatherLite.

This should be lightweight, floating and strong/tough enough to screw some screweyes in.

So i wonder if anyone of you can give me some advice on this.

I mean; has anyone used this featherLite or is there something better?And, is it possible to use screweyes in casted body's or does it have to be wired through?

Puzzles puzzles..

Thnx!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Been casting baits for about 4 mos. I use Alumilite and add Microballoons for floatation. Google Alumilite and check out their videos on mold making and casting. They have a DVD that is awesome and answers most all questions. Anything I can do to help, just let me know at captsully18ataoldotcom.

David

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

captsully18ataoldotcom

Edited by redg8r
Removed actual email address, as Captsully obfuscated it intentionally

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IMO, Featherlite is a casting resin with microballoons premixed.

I ordered a batch & opened it up to see what looked like a can of wood filler.

I called the company & asked if they possibly sent me an old batch & they said they get this question all the time. Mix the product thoroughly & it should thin out, still, it is quite viscous.

My trials have shown standard casting urethanes will indeed hold a typical screw eye. predrilling is preferred.

I'm a smoothcast fan from smoothon, but most casting urethanes are similar & usually differ in cure times.

Thru wires can be used, as long as the mold will allow for placement before pouring.

Rotocasting is also possible, but quite tricky & inconsistent.

I still like using expanding urethane foam, because you dont need to incorporate a floating filler, but thru wire would be preferred unless you get a high lb per cubic foot variety. Some urethane foams are as tough & dense as balsa & even hardwoods.

But just like wood, the higher the density, the lower the buoyancy.

Good luck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm a smoothcast fan from smoothon, but most casting urethanes are similar & usually differ in cure times.

Thru wires can be used, as long as the mold will allow for placement before pouring.

...

I still like using expanding urethane foam, because you dont need to incorporate a floating filler, but thru wire would be preferred unless you get a high lb per cubic foot variety. Some urethane foams are as tough & dense as balsa & even hardwoods.

But just like wood, the higher the density, the lower the buoyancy.

Good luck

These expanding urethane foams you are referring to, are those what are used to make Little Earls, (Suddeth crankbaits)? If so what is the harder outer layer on these baits?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
These expanding urethane foams you are referring to, are those what are used to make Little Earls, (Suddeth crankbaits)? If so what is the harder outer layer on these baits?

as for Suddeth, I couldnt tell you for sure, but the urethane foam itself forms an outer "skin" with the closed cell structure contained within.

If youve ever seen the household expanding foam insulation (greatstuff, etc.) you'll notice it forms a relatively smooth skin on the outer surface as it cures. Same stuff, only much more rigid.

Occasionally you will encounter a void in the skin, but it can be filled. I do believe featherlight has similar properties with a textured outer surface & sanding will open the closed air cells.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Featherlite, sucks.

Like Red said it has a crust on part B, I had some that wouldn't break-up and mix, had to strain it out.

I suggest Alumilite RC-3 and Micro-balloons.

You will be happy with the results.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There you have it.

I've seen Coley's processes, he knows his stuff.

I still like the foam, but all have their pro's & cons.

One thing I'll say is the alumilite/microballoon combo should hold up to toothy fish better than the foam, not sure what species your targeting, but just something to take into consideration.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There you have it.

I've seen Coley's processes, he knows his stuff.

I still like the foam, but all have their pro's & cons.

One thing I'll say is the alumilite/microballoon combo should hold up to toothy fish better than the foam, not sure what species your targeting, but just something to take into consideration.

BIG pike ... :)Thnx for the info guys.. I have a lot to learn...JP

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After reading all the posts I could find on "foam" "foamies" etc. I ended up using the Alumilite that was recommended. What I found is that stuff is tuff! I ran over a blank with my Yukon and it did not break. It is not as bouyant as balsa and the finished RC 1.5 I made is a slow floater. Just watch breathing in the micro balloons when mixing. The entire process including mold making I learned by reading posts her on TU with the help of a couple of PM's.

Allen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now