tyjack

Techniques you use to apply your clear coat.

24 posts in this topic

Didn't use Etex, but used to use a multiple coat clear system that was pretty cumbersome. Switched to FlexCoat Ultra V for single coat coverage and could knock out probably 50-60 lures in that 1.5 hours with 5-10 lures per mix and probably just as high of quality of clear, if not better. If I ever quit manufacturing my own clear, I'd go right back to Ultra V in a heartbeat.

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Tyjack

I'm not so sure if you will have access to the tutorials, as you are not a 'club member' yet.

But, as applying the top coat with a brush, should not take more than 3 minutes, I assume the rest of the time is spent rotating the lure manually, in order to keep the top coat level. This is good technique but I agree, rather tedious.

http://www.tackleunderground.com/forum/search.php?searchid=364068&photoplog_searchinfo=1&photoplog_searchquery=drying+wheel+motor

Above is a link to a search on “drying wheel motor”. Read the threads that refer to drying wheel or lure turner, for a variety of ways to construct this magical piece of equipment. Well worth the effort if you plan on making hard baits a hobby. This piece of kit will release your hands to coat ten more lures in the same time.

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Corey,

I dont know why it would take that long but for me to do a swimbait @ about 10 inches and multiplpe sections it only takes 5 - 10 minutes...

I use D2T Epoxy... mix it in a pill cup and apply with a FLUX brush. The Flux brush is the cheapest disposable brush i have found and it has about 1/2inch surface area. Other than that i dont thin it or anything. I get some bubbles here and there but if your worried a light sanding and another coat and it is golden. Hope that helps!

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Corey,

I am currently using Nu Lustre 55 UV inhibited epoxy, but I have used a lot of Etex, in making my 6"-9" gliders.

I have a drying wheel that's two plywood wheels mounted on a rotisserie shaft, about 14" apart, with screw eyes on the opposing faces.

I mount my gliders on the wheel, using paper clips to adjust for the different lengths of the baits, and then coat them on the wheel.

With the paper clips, I'm able to rotate them enough while the wheel is off to get the epoxy on all the way around.

I use a soft 1/4' wide artists brush.

I let the mixed epoxy sit for a few minutes to let the air bubbles out, and then, if there are still a lot of bubbles, I'll hit it with the hair dryer, to make it more runny and let the bubbles escape faster.

I've heard of using a torch to get rid of the bubbles, but I've never tried it. My luck, I'd burn up my lure.

I've found a good light is important so I can be sure all of the lure is covered.

I try to cover the lure without putting too much on, so I don't get sags. Even with a drying wheel, sags can happen if you put it on too thick.

I usually put two coats on, so I don't worry about not having a thick enough coat the first time. I coat the lure, turn it on my 1 rmp wheel for 24 hours, wipe the lure down with alcohol, let it dry (hair dryer), and re coat, letting it turn for another 24 hours. The epoxy is stiff enough after 6-8 hours that I could turn off the wheel, but I just let it run all night in my garage.

When they come off the wheel, they're ready to fish.

I've found that the brush must be very clean, or residue that's in it from previous sessions will get into the finish coat.

I clean the brush with alcohol, and then with MEK. That seems to get all of the residue out.

I also make sure the brush is completely dry before I start to coat.

Any solvent still in the brush can ruin the topcoat.

With a strong light, I'm able to spot blank spots, or bubbles, or residue, and deal with them while the epoxy is still runny.

I also make jointed swimbaits, and, for those, I coat the insides of the joints with D2T first, since it sets quickly and is waterproof, and then, once it's set, assemble the lure and put in on the wheel for coating the faces with Nu Luster. I've found both the Etex and Nu Lustre are less brittle and tougher than D2T, and work much better for the faces of my wooden lures.

One thing I've found is that the D2T can still be tacky when a joint lets two pieces touch, so I put a small piece of scotch tape at any potential contact points.

And I coat the joints with Megastrike, or some other scent, before I fish them for the first time. For some reason, the fresh epoxy seems to stick to itself, even after it's cured hard and smooth, and the scent acts as a lubricant to prevent the joints from binding on a cast. I only need to do this the first time I throw that lure. After that, the joints don't stick.

Edited by mark poulson

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First of all, beautiful lure.

Now, I use the 1/4" artist's brush because I also had issues with flux brushes. I clean the brush in solvent when it's new, and dry it with a cloth, pulling on the bristles to remove any loose hairs. I still get the occasional hair. I just watch for them, and pick them off while the epoxy is still runny.

The 1/4" brush puts the epoxy on fast, and it's easier to brush out and get good pressure on all parts of the lure than with the flux brush. I would never use a 1" brush, because I'd be afraid that I'd have trouble controling that much epoxy at once.

One thing Hazmail taught me is to wear latex gloves when I paint, to keep finger prints (oil) off the lure and avoid dry spots caused by the oil.

Edited by mark poulson

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I never want to fool around with bristles, so I use the cheapo sponge brushes, you can pay a lot for them at a hardware store, or keep your eyes open and you can find deals on them in walmart and other places for a dozen or 20 or so for a buck or two. They don't collect dust or lose hairs. I use etex, and don't seem to have any trouble with dust or anything.

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Corey,

I think it may be horse hair. Dark brown bristles.

It was from a cheap set of artists brushes I picked up at a hobby store.

Sorry, I don't know the brand name.

Natural fibers are probably better than nylon, although I don't know that for certain.

In house painting, generally, nylon bristles are used for water based paints, because they don't absorb water, and natural bristles are used for solvent based paints. Maybe that holds true for epoxy, which is a solvent base.

I've never tried nylon bristle brushes for epoxy, because I didn't have any when I started, not because I'm particularly smart. Just got lucky.

Thanks, Mark and Wayupnorth36

Mark, I

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Tyjack, I use Dick Nites exclusively now. I apply it with a 1/4" badger hair brush. This stuff goes on very smoothly, dries very hard. I apply 2 or sometimes 3 coats letting each dry 24 hrs. The badger hair is soft and applies the DN very well. Like Mark, I apply the clear coat after I put it on the drying wheel. I can apply it fast enough that I can stop wheel to hang another bait and apply coat to it and have never had a problem with runs in previous baits. Hope this helps.

David

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Hey Corey, I remember your previous moniker, welcome back! I use a soft 1/4 inch Oxhair artists brush also for applying Dicknite's topcoat. Oxen throw a bit less of a fit than a badger when you pluck a few hairs from its back :eek::lol:. captsully18 must be wearing some seriously heavy gloves when goes to obtain his brush bristles!

I can see how it would take you a while to brush E-tex on a big bait with a little brush and getting that perfect amount on. With Dicknite's topcoat one key is brushing it on quickly, but thoroughly, and not going back over what you've previously coated, especially so on a large bait.

I clean my bushes with alcohol, and then soap and water to keep them in tip-top shape. I very rarely get a hair in my clear coat, and when I do, I immediately remove it with tweezers that I keep handy when I'm clear-coating.

Dean

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I tried to clear coat my baits with a badger comb whenever I CAN!!

WORKS LIKE A CHARM!!! :yeah:

YOU DA MAN DAVID

DUH, t'anks Rook. Dats nice of ya. Did ya notice that Dean saves all the loose hairs he picks offen baits? He saves 'em and puts 'em back in the handle of the brush when he finishes. Such a cheapskate :P. However, I must admit that he be the man.

David

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Hey Corey, I remember your previous moniker, welcome back! I use a soft 1/4 inch Oxhair artists brush also for applying Dicknite's topcoat. Oxen throw a bit less of a fit than a badger when you pluck a few hairs from its back :eek::lol:. captsully18 must be wearing some seriously heavy gloves when goes to obtain his brush bristles!

Dean

Dean, ckarren stands for my name

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The hard part is getting it to rollover on its back so you can get some of the softer hair. :popcorn::lolhuh: That is funny!!!

-Corey

Corey, it really aint dat hard. just scratch him 'hind his ears a while, and he will be like putty in your hands.:D

David

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Corey,

Good to see you back again. Stick with the two part expoxies, they cannot be beat so far. I still use the same old disposable brushes with the bristles and it probably takes me two minutes per lure to get two coats on which I don't think is too bad. I have tried and tried to find a clear coat that I can dip with no success.

In my humble opinion and no disrespect to others that like it, Dick Nite stinks to high heaven and goes on too thin. Component System also goes on too thin and isn't hard enough to provide good protection. I have also tried spray can lacquer and a sprayable car finish, too thin also.

I considered a UV cure epoxy, tried one but it took too long to set up. If you have the money for the expensive lights this might be the best option for production.

Jed

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