Thad

What size airbursh do you use to spray your clear coat?

17 posts in this topic

For you that spray DN or any other clear coat. What size needle are you working with. I currently use a Iwata Eclipse HP-CS with a .35 needle to paint my baits. Will that size work or do I need to change. I don't want to ruin the one I have so I may get a cheaper one just to spray the clear coat.

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I dip it, others brush DN. A few spray with a cheap single action airbrush. I wouldn't use my Iwata either. Don't forget a mask!

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I suggest brushing it on. Unless you know what you are doing you will not only destroy the airbrush but you'll do serious bodily harm! Solvents are not things to mess around with.

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I know how to use an airbrush and how to clean it. I also have a good ventilation system. I would just like to know what size anybody uses.

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If you are going to spray on your clear coat you would be better off using automotive urethanes. To spray epoxy you will need to thin it to the point that they will not be any where near as tough as it should be.

As for the ventilation, if you are spraying anything that requires solvents to thin it you should be wearing a dual cartridge respirator also.

Just looking out for you!

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Hey man I appreciate it, I'm scared of all that stuff. I wear the mask, plus the ventilation, and I do it outside when nature allows. But I'm just sick of devcon and really want to go with a spray.

So you would prefer an automotive clear over DN? I have heard some people use it for high end customers (pros). If it's good enough for them then it's good enough for me.

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My concern is that the epoxy will no longer retain its qualities and the finish may not hold up over time. Epoxies aren't meant to be sprayed as they are fairly thick. Reducing it with the appropriate solvent (acetone most likely) will change its ability to protect and it may not even be any more durable then the paint it's covering.

If you want durability a brushed on epoxy like Nu-Lustre 55 with uv protection is the way to go.

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I spray DN with a pasche single action airbrush using an H-3 tip. I sometimes ise an H-5 for heavier coats. Just thin it down to a good consistancy. Thin as little as possible and be sure to use a good quality virgin lacquer thinner. Clean up is easy also, just spray some thinner through it until its clean. Its much easier than you think.

Jay

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Creek Monster, I'm curious to know how the coats hold up to fish teeth and hook rash compared to unreduced epoxy.

Also does thinning it for spraying effect the open time (Time before it begins to be unworkable).

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I think that a sprayed version would be more durable then a brush or dip on. I know that you need to thin it a little but you get thinner coats that dry better and you can add as many as you want. I was talking to someone the other day that epoxies floors. He was talking about how important it was to get the coats as thin as possible because the top will dry and the middle won't ever dry if it is too thick.

The thinner the coats the harder the finish. I just don't feel I can get them thin enough when brushing. I haven't tried your method with the new stuff you were talking about in a post I read the other day but to me I think it would be easier to spray in just about every facet.

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Epoxies that we use do not "dry" but cure as a result of a chemical reaction between the resin and the hardener. you can pour the epoxy two inches thick and it will cure fully as long as you mixed it thoroughly and had the correct mix ratio.

Thinning it to spray will in no way make it cure harder, or be any better if you have to do many coats as opposed to one thick one. I know this information from speaking directly with the manufacturers of the Nu-Lustre 55 products.

In fact if you allow the thin coats to cure fully before respraying, you will not have as secure a bond as with one thick coat because the layers will not chemically bond, only mechanically.

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Oh, well that all makes sense. I'm new to learning all the epoxies and I really appreciate your help. I'm going to give that Nu-Lustre a try before I go to a spray.

Thanks for your help.

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Oh, well that all makes sense. I'm new to learning all the epoxies and I really appreciate your help. I'm going to give that Nu-Lustre a try before I go to a spray.

Thanks for your help.

My pleasure, that's why we're here my friend.

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Hmm, I'm not sure I buy the idea of thinner = harder, but then, I'm no epoxy scientist. Seems to me epoxy curing is a chemical reaction between the 2 parts and exposure to air has nothing to do with it. If we're talking epoxy cut with a solvent, a thin coat will allow the solvent to flash off faster - but again, I don't know that it would enhance the hardness of the cured epoxy. Could your friend have confused hardness for cure state? Most epoxies reach max cure and max hardness after about a week - long after the floor installer has moved on to other jobs:?

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Thad, I think your argument holds up for a moisture cure urethane, like DN. Are you sure your friend was using a 2 part epoxy and not a moisture cure jobby.

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Sorry for the late reply. The DN has proven to be pretty darn tough on my lures, (bass) but I don't know if it gets quite as hard as epoxy. As for hook rash and such, I've seen little difference in my DN coated lures and factory mass produced ones. I have thrown them against an old dam wall with very little damage.(just a small painy chip)It was comparable to the damage you would see on a rattle trap or bomber if you did the same. i switched to DN for ease and the ability to coat more lures in less time. I am highly satisfied with it. As for time before unworkable, hasn't been a problem for me. I mix about one or two ounces at a time and it remains workable for as long as I have needed it. (sometimes around 2 hours). I only mix what I'm going to use and throw the remainder away. HINT: Transfer the DN to a mason jar and only pour out what you need, NEVER, I mean NEVER pour it back into the jar when your finished.

Jay

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Every time I've tried to thin epoxy it's seemed to weaken it. DN is NOT epoxy though.

DN sprays on great for me with a 0.5 mm iwata HP-BCS. I mix it in a 2 oz airbrush bottle. If I don't paint anything for a couple weeks it'

s fine as long as it's thinned. I use acetone, can't speak for lacquer thinner. In the airbrush bottle I use 40cc DN and 10 CC acetone. It holds up well and won't cure if the bottle sealed, just do your best to keep it out of the light or it'll yellow in the bottle. It'll still be just as thin though.

To clean up, I just spray about an ounce of acetone through the brush. This'll work for a few hours break, haven't tried it longer. If longer than that, I keep a little jar of acetone. cloth soaked in acetone to clean the needle. Dip an in between teeth brush in acetone to clean out the gun.

This may not be the best advice, but when I'm not spraying, my nozzle and nozzle covers live inside that little jar of acetone. Haven't noticed any problems with them yet, but there sure as hell isn't any DN curing inside there. Just make sure if there's any orings in the covers that you take the orings off. May also not be a good idea if you're using a finer brush, any particles in the jar come out of the 0.5 mm nozzle no problem.

Edited by clamboni

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