jeep brah

painting

27 posts in this topic

Step 1

Go to McDonalds..

Step 2.

Get a straw

Step 3.

Put paint in your mouth

STEP 3A. DON'T INHALE OR SWALLOW :lol:

Step 4.

Put straw in your mouth

Step 5

Blow! :yay:

Rattle cans are one way to go.

Brush/Qtip/fingers is another.

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You can get a cheap Badger airbrush kit containing a can of Propel compressed air for around $25. Hobby acrylic paints like Apple Barrel, etc, are about $2 per 2 oz bottle. Look for a 40 or 50% off coupon from Michael's or Hobby Lobby for the airbrush. The alternative is aerosol paint cans (rattle cans) which usually contain solvents and have a single wide spray pattern. The airbrush is a better tool. $2 for a double syringe of Devcon Two Ton epoxy at Walmart to coat the paint, a small paint brush, and you're an "artiste". That's about the cheapest you can go unless you huff paint like Rookie:drool:.

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Some people handpaint (brushes, toothpicks, Q-tips) their baits too, sometimes along with Rattle cans. I do personally, not beautiful, but they do catch fish. Look at Stone Coal Tackle's work in the gallery, he does some real nice hand painted stuff.

Good luck,

Mike

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@ jeep brah

I paint my lures with modelmaking enamels(Revell , Humbrol) , these are available in small containers in model shops .

I also use rattle cans to be faster with painting , since painting a bigger batch of lures by brushing takes some time .

But I have noticed , that rattlecans(at least over here in Germany) get quite costly over the time , when always having to buy new ones !

Never considered about an airbrush , since I believe(though not sure), that the cleaning of it between the single colors being shot woult take quite a lot of time ?

Another alternative is brushpainting with acrylic paints , also available in smaller containers , but these cost about twice as much as the modelmaking enamels , but have the advantage of being mixable(different tones) and are also not affected by any topcoat gloss paints(may happen with solvent based enamels or spraypaint) .

But if your looking for a cheap start-out , go with with a few modelmaking enamels , before topcoating apply two or three coats of acrylic clear paint to protect the paint job against eventual damage maybe caused by the final clearcoats .

Greetz , diemai

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Diemai, my gravity feed airbrush is easy to clean. Shoot plain water or glass cleaner into the airbrush cup, press the trigger and repeat once or twice until the brush is clean. I use a spray bottle of water in my garage and catch the spray/drips in a trash can. It takes maybe 20-30 seconds. I do a more extensive cleaning after the session by partially disassembling the brush and cleaning the parts - but that takes only a few minutes. So it's not troublesome and you get the advantages of better paint control, non-toxic process, a wide palette of acrylic paints, and less cost over time. A 2 oz bottle of acrylic paint lasts months for hobby painting since you're often using only 5-6 drops of paint in the airbrush on each shot. Try it, you'll like it!

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@ BobP

Thanks about your advice and explanation , really sounds a lot easier than I thought !

Guess , that you're most likely using acrylic paints to shoot , so only water is enough to clean up .

What would be the easiest to handle source of comprimed air , canned air , a car tire or a compressor ?

Sorry , but really don't know nothing about it , never bothered:huh: !

Greetz , diemai

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Well, I like a compressor - one that can deliver at least 40 psi SUSTAINED pressure. I use an airbrush compressor received as a gift. If I were starting from scratch, I'd choose a tool compressor due to the lower cost and ability to use it for other things around the house. But of course, that hikes cost by $75-100. That's why I suggested Propel canned air. A big can of Propel sells for around $10 and will do quite a few baits depending on how wasteful you are. An air tank ($20-30) or a spare tire can also be used but I've never used either. Most guys who get an airbrush are going to buy a compressor sooner or later, just for the convenience. And over time, the initial cost is amortized as you paint more baits.

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@ BobP

Alright , thanks a lot for your rapid answer , very kind of you:yay: !

Before I'd finally make up my mind , I would surely check around more posts and also sites , but all this sounds quite good to me:yes: .

Biggest problem that I would have about the whole thing is to convince my old gal , that I'd need some bigger items for my luremakin' workshop again:twocents::twocents::( !

greetz , diemai

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Dieter,

I have three brushes. All are gravity flow, which means the paint is added to a cup on top of the brush, and is drawn down through the nozzle by the air flow.

My first one, which is an Iwata HP-C, has a variable flow trigger that controls both air and paint flow, plus a separate control of the max amount of paint flow.

My second one is an Iwata knockoff from Airbrush City that has a MAC air volume control valve beneath the tip. I bought this for the finer tip to do detail work.

My last brush, which I bought for undercoating and priming, is a Badger 360, can also be used with paint bottles in a suction, under the brush position.

If I had it to do again, I'd just have the Iwata. $200+-, but now that I've painted for a while, I can use it for everything.

The key, for me, is to thin the paint enough that it's like skim milk, so it passes through the nozzle without clogging. I even thin my pearls and opaques, and just do a few more coats.

When I want to do a fine line, I turn down the paint valve at the back of the Iwata, and leave the pressure up at the 35psi so the tip doesn't clog. Or I use a stencil.

If I can do it, airbrushing must be easy. And, if you use water based paints, cleanup is a breeze. One minute between colors, and five minutes when you finish for the day.

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@ mark poulson

Thanks , Mark , for your kind further explanations , all sound very interesting !

At least I am obviously totally wrong about about my prejudices concerning cleaning up the airbrush gear .

But before buying some new equipment I'd first have to look around , read books and find out , what would be best for me !

I'd really have to start from zero , and I must admit , that the cost to start out at all is putting me off a bit , and even more it would my wife(if she'd get to know) , since it would be a couple of pairs of shoes less , LOL:huh::huh::lol::lol: !

greetz , Dieter

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Diemai.

Another thing to consider with compressors is the noise. I mention this because you mentioned having to keep your lady happy. Depending on the size of your house and its ability to absorb sound, you should start to plan its location.

Go to a store and get them to give you a demmo, to get an idea what you are dealing with.

The noise is not constant, it just kicks in for a minute or so, to top up the pressure, as you use the air. This issue has been discussed here on TU in the past.

I am not trying to put you off, just want to avoid surprises. This issue IS resolvable.

Dave

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@ Vodkaman

Thanks , Dave , but I am aware of that:yes: !

I can't afford using a noisy compressor , since I live in a rented flat , the neighbors might get mad at me , if that thing would be constantly too loud :whistle:.

But I think , that I have seen small compressors in modelmaking shops before , haven't bothered about a close look so far , but I can imagine , that these might be not as noisy , since they are supposed to be used for hobbyist's work probably inside flats or homes (many , especially military , models require an airbrush design for the "real" look , I guess) .

If these should perform well for modelmaking , they should do for lures as well , for repainting your car they won't work out , lol :):lol:!

Just my thoughts , greetz , Dieter

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Yes, I had one in my last apartment, for the same reason. I was quite happy with it, a mere whisper.

The down side is that the tank is very small and so you cannot do sustained work of more than a few seconds. This is fine for lure work, which is generally a dab here and there. I used rattle cans for the base coat.

A lot more expensive but solved the critical noise problem. I cannot quote you a price, as I was paying way over the top in Malaysia. I think the guy saw me comming.

Dave

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Dieter,

I have a friend who does leather repairs on shoes and hand bags.

And guess what he uses to color the repairs and blend it in?

Airbrushes!

You could always tell her you're thinking of learning how to dye shoes and handbags, so she can have matching stuff at the drop of a hat! :lol:

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My airbrush compressor is small, has no air tank and cuts on whenever I pull the trigger on the airbrush. If I lived in an apartment, it would surely not disturb the neighbors but if my wife were sleeping, I'd probably end up with a few extra dents in my head. There are models advertised as quiet units (e.g. Silentaire for one) but they are quite expensive. Yet another option - I read here on the site awhile back that someone was using a tank of compressed CO2 on his airbrush. A moderate size tank should last for a long time and the gas is perfectly dry. It might be a good option for truly silent painting depending on the cost of refilling the tank and the cost of the tank itself.

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Deiter - On Paint, I am with Mark, and use water based acrylics, just about exclusivly (and some Tamiya). I buy good quality artists paints (various, in tubes @ about $5), and have had some liquitex for 30 years - a tube lasts forever. Just squeeze a bit out and mix a little water or better still 'Windex' (window cleaner) and you can make any colour you like and store excess in a film container.

I figure if a the paintings last a hundred years, I would have little problem with a lure - just make sure they are good quality, which will have nice fine pigments, and good solid colours, you DO get what you pay for. pete

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Thank you guys for your further advice , obviously it seems , that small , low-noise compressors are either expensive or of poor performance :?.

I won't like waiting during brushing on longer shots until sufficient pressure would build up again , and if it was only for seconds :nono:.

I remember to have seen a book on airbrushing in our local public library long time ago , guess I'll get back there checking it out again:yes: .

Seems , that there are bigger difficulties to consider than just the cleaning problem that I always have assumed to be the worst:? .

The CO2 caskets are also an option for me , but this again stands and falls with their refill price and/or local availability .

And Mark , don't think , I could trick her this way , she'd surely be suspecting something if I'd voluntarily suggest to do a different hobby work at home but luremaking , lol:huh::nuhuh::lol: !

Thank ya' all , Dieter

Edited by diemai
altering text

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Jeep one thing you should think about before you start buying stuff is how serious you are about lure building. If your only going to build a few lures once in a blue moon get the rattle cans or a few bottles of model paint and some brushes. If your sure your going to get serious or i should say addicted to this craft then you should bite the bullet and go airbrush and waterbased paint. Why do i say this you ask i say this from my own experiences trial and error$$$. First i bought model paint and brushes but didn,t like the results so i bought a cheap airbrush,that improved my painting, that is until the solvents in the paint ruined the seals in the brush. Next it was hobby acrylics (you know the stuff, 12oz for a buck ) the stuff i bought would of plugged a 2" fire hose. What i,m getting at is i,ve got a bunch of stuff here that,s drying up and collecting dust because i tried to save a buck.Get it right the first time and you,ll end up saving money and building better lures alot sooner. Read the thread where NBI Marketing is offering TU members a 35% discount on brushes looks like a good deal to me,buy some decent airbrush paint i use Createx and DR PH Martins mostly, but the guys on here all have they,re own favorites.As far as a compressor goes well i don,t know what to say it can be a rather large expense unless you shop for a used one, i did read somewhere that you could use a airpig but don,t know how that would work out or howlong it would last between fill ups but would be cheaper than the cans of compressed air.Most importantly is start reading the threads on TU the guys here are the cream of the crop when it comes to lure building. Just my opinion about what i did wrong for myself thought i,d share that you.

Take Care Jimbo

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Accidentally got to the hobby deparment of a big store in Hamburg today , so I've checked out a bit about airbrushing in there .

There was a "beginners complete set" by Revell , for plastic model painting , containing a spray gun , a comprimed air can , some paints and accessories , at about 90

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