getyourfishon

Mat Finish Hard bait

14 posts in this topic

I am assuming he means matte, as in not shiny. I don't really know how you would do it with the clears most people here use other than maybe scuff the finished lure with a very fine sandpaper or emory cloth. That might work.

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Are you able to spray on your clear? If you can, try misting on the final coat very lightly. May or may not work.

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You can mix a little bit of talc in the clear to get the gloss you want. Make sure it's pure talc and doesn't contain any oils though. Very very slight impact on clarity.

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Flattening agent is mixed with the paint/clearcoat to dull the finish. What I have used was intended for acrylic lacquers and enamels. I have no idea if something is on the market for the urethanes or waterbase. But I would bet there is something similar.

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You can lightly sand epoxy with 400 grit or finer paper to get a matte finish but when wet the surface reverts to partially gloss as the scratches are filled with water. Probably the most effective matte is the soft plastic coating you see on some baits. But it's not especially durable and it has a milky color that requires especially bright finish underneath to show through to the bait's surface.

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Is there a difference between a matt and a shiny finish, viewed submerged?

I suspect not, but I have not made the comparison. Maybe someone could do the comparison and report back.

Dave

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Get yourself a sealable round container like a coffee can. Glue a peice of wood block to the outside bottom. Put a screw right in the center of the wood but dont sink it all the way. It needs to be strong enough to chuck in a variable speed drill. Chuck it. Cut sheet of soft craft foam and line the circumference of the can inside. Put your lure, about a 1/4 cup of water, and 5 or 6 tablespoons of playground sand in the can. run it at about 15 or 20 rpm for 3 or 4 minutes. (it needs to be run sideways) It is called tumbleing and is common practice in machine shops....along with liquid honing and bead blasting.

Edited by Sonny.Barile

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I happened to discover a matte finish on some of my lures after using propionate + acetone in a thick solution which was left for months in a jar. Problem is, that the finish is not only matte, it is milky as well.

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Is there a difference between a matt and a shiny finish, viewed submerged?

I suspect not, but I have not made the comparison. Maybe someone could do the comparison and report back.

Dave

I think Vodkaman's right. When you put a lure in the water, the finish is going to look clear, even if you've scuffed it up with steel wool.

Test a sample by scuffing it, and then wetting it with spit.

The ability of water to fill in the scuff marks and any irregularities or flaws is a lifesaver for lures with bad topcoats.

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