kahawai

sealing holes

21 posts in this topic

hi,

what do you all use to seal the holes that you put the lead in? wood filler(what kind)? epoxy? or something else? i've used both in the past but am wondering if there is a more precise way to be sure that the filler doesn't affect the weight of the lure(esp small lures)- ideally something that is neutrally buoyant. i also have worries that wood filler doesn't bond to the lure lead well, and can take a bit of sculpting too. if i have a lure with a rounded belly and i drill out a couple of holes, the filler should be able to not only cover the holes but also be able to be shaped to give it a seamless round belly.

thanks!

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As far as weight and density goes, I guess that depends on the kind of wood you're working with. Lately, I've been using an epoxy putty stick and it's handy stuff. Depending on the brand, it is workable for several minutes and cures hard in 5-10 mins, plus it has a density similar to hardwood. A very thin slice of stick is enough for ballast holes, so one stick lasts a long time. Dip a finger in water or solvent to smooth and shape it. Sand it after it begins to harden but before it fully cures. It works well for repairing gouges, filling ballast holes, or even to fill in an old lip slot if you need to install a new lip.

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I've been turning some baits on a lathe. Before the bait is fully turned, I drill my hole (3/8") and then I use some lead plugs that I made for this that are slightly bigger. I cover them with polyester glue and press them into the wood while still on the lathe. In about five or six minutes I turn on the lathe again and finish turning the bait to size. The lead shapes pretty well as it is about as hard/soft as the wood. When I'm done, the there's really no need to fill anything. Seal, prime and paint.

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Hey Bob, what epoxy putty are you using? Any certain brand you like? I've been filling my holes & dings w/ 5 minute D2T. It works OK, but always looking for something better.

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Wood dust can be mixed in with the epoxy, to give a thick paste. I fill a jar with the dust after a session on the belt sander.

I haven't used it with epoxy, but use it often with PVA (elmers). As long as the layer is not too thick, it dries rock hard.

Dave

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I have used wood filler (comes in a tube) for wooden lures, and also polyester filler. The polyester is great because it hardens in half an hour, doesn't crimp and is rockhard. BUT it gives you a splitting headache if you don't wear a mask.

I guess I'll check that bondo stuff...

;)

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Jeep, I think bondo is basically the same stuff. So you'll still need the mask. Please correct me if I am wrong.

Dave

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i use the left over 2 part when i'm done coating some lures. i put the 2 part in the hole(s) , then the ballast in (unless i just pour the lead in, then i skip this step, and just glue in the dowel/plug, lol) with just about a 3/16'' gap and then the same with a small piece of dowel/plug i cut from the same kind of wood. then i start more lures and repeat. it's worked well for me. i've used gorilla glue too with decent results, but i prefer the coating since it's got more flex and will hold better than more brittle fast cure products, plus it's less waste. but gorilla does form bubbles and would have some bouyancy. good luck

i wouldn't recommend making a habit of turning a piece of wood with a lead bullet in it.

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Use epoxy filler that is available at Lowes in the plumbing dept. For balsa I use regular wood filler and seal it with the rest of the bait with sanding sealer.

Hope this helps.

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I use milliput a 2 part epoxy stick has lots of working time and bond's to the wood and lead better than standard wood filler and because of the longer working time there's very little waste

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CA Delta, I have several putty sticks, all different brands, and they all seem to work about the same as far as cure time, consistency, etc. I don't know the brands 'cause it's printed on the paper liner that wraps the stick inside the plastic tube, and I throw that away. Just cut off a thin slice with a razor blade, knead until it's an even color, and voila. You can get them at home improvement centers.

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When I made one piece baits, I used Plumbers Putty (the stick epoxy) and wood filler. Since I use an acetone based wood sealer, I have found that the Plumbers Putty works best because it stays hard, and the wood filler will get soft when I do the first soak in the acetone sealer.

The Plumbers Putty is heavier than balsa but it makes little difference in the action as long as your hole is 1/4" or less.

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Minwax 2 part wood filler has worked well for me so far. I started using it this year to fill in ballast holes on some topwaters prototypes and it has held up well.

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If it's not such a big volume to be filled , I pour mixed two-component glue into the hole , if the weight should not sit snugly , I also pour in glue first , so all space gets covered , virtually glue in the weight .

If the exit of the weighthole should be located on a curved portion of the lure , thus the glue would flow out , or the volume is too large , I'd mix some fine woodchips from my lathe into the glue and stir it well . After getting a good mixture , I'd blow the remaining(dry) chips off the mixing bin .

I'd utilize the glue's mixing stick to apply my "putty" into the hole , it starts to set a lot faster than the pure glue , at this stage I can sprinkle some very fine wooddust on it to shape and also comprime it with my finger , it won't stick to my skin that way !

Its just like a baker putting flour on his dough to roll it out not sticking to the table !

Both methods take 24 hrs to cure , before I work the glue plugs flush with a "Dremel" router bit and by filing(sanding) .

The dried glue tends to smear into the files teeth after a while , I use a steel bristled brush to clean it and retain its sharpness .

Greetz :yay:, diemai

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i learned the plug/dowel trick from Bobbie Vander Velden:worship:, the maker inventer of the bobbie baits. he passed away earlier this year:halo: and though i didn't hang out with him outside shows and meetings, still the things i learned from him at muskie shows were priceless. of course he wasn't giving everything away, but he did ''hint'' a-lot.... a-lot. like ''hinting'' about where to put weight on a globe. he ''hinted'' i should rip one of his baits apart and look, lol. i had a retired one so i did. learned a-lot from just that. like i said... priceless. really like the fact he didn't care about how his baits looked as long as they worked. great guy. i'll miss him.:(

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Bondo

Bondo is too easy to use. Light, strong, dries/sets fast, sticks to both wood and PVC, sands and shapes well, can be applied on a curved surface without a sag, the list goes on.

If I've epoxied in the hardware and there is a non-structural void, I use bondo.

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I agree with mark, it is an all round winner. But take care, especially with lighter woods when sanding. The resin is very hard and if you just wrap a piece of emery around your bait, the wood will disappear faster than the resin. Be selective in how you sand it, pay attention.

Dave

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thanks guys for the replies. its been truly useful stuff.

i think i'm gonna give bondo a try... if i can find the stuff in this part of the world.

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Hiya

Just before you go here's one more for the melting pot that has not got a mention. This is how I do it.

Hot glue gun. Fill the hole with glue making sure it adheres to the edge of the hole simply by rubbing the nozzle around the edge. Then fill until the glue forms a proud dome of glue. Allow it to set which takes around 20 seconds.

DSCF0838.jpg

Here is the only tricky bit. Carefully shave the dome to the body shape, I use a well sharpened wood chisel for this, I dare say you could use a knife or even a small wood plane.

DSCF0839.jpg

Once it is flat you can then smooth with whatever abrasive paper you use. Once sanded finish with an ultra smooth finishing sand paper.

DSCF0846.jpg

DSCF0853.jpg

DSCF0847.jpg

Real easy and real quick, you can trim and sand smooth 2 holes in a bait in around 3 to 4 minutes. I will add that you cannot effectively sand the glue as it is not rock hard and will not 'dust' as say a wood filler or two part would, you can only smooth it. This makes a good seal and is flexible as well.

Interesting to see the different methods the fellas use and mine is just another :yay:

Edited by philB

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