snooterfish

Iwata airbrush

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i guess this question would basically be for Iwata Airbrush users. i am thinking about getting a new Iwata Airbrush for painting my lures. which model would you guys suggest?

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I have the hp-ch and love it! Mainly because it allows a lot of control. Being new to air brushing it helped me do things that would have taken years to learn. There is a valve to control the paint and another to control the air. So you can leave your pressure regulator alone. For a new air brush user that dose not want to up grade later this is a good air brush. If you can air brush with an artist, then any of them are a good choice.

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I agree, the Iwata HP-CH is an excellent choice.

Another one is the Eclipse CS and then buy the separate MAC valve that attaches between the airbrush and hose.

Depending on the type of paints you use make sure to have solvent proof O-rings.

I think that gravity fed airbrushes are perfect for small objects such as lures.

Edited by Snax

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If you can afford it by the brush with the MAC valve on the brush itself. I switch brushes back and forth sometimes and wish all of mine had a MAC valve on the brush. It is easy enough to alter the air pressure at the compressor, but I think the micro fine tuning you can do on the airbrush is the best. And that way if you run more than one brush from a splitter the pressure is what you need for each brush.

And there are a few (well lots, they just don't all post a lot any more) really good artists on the site. Check out the work of those who respond, depending on who does. Especially the artists of the site. There are a few who I just really like and that might help you with your decision. I am a newbie compared to many.

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To me it would depend on what I already owned and their tip sizes. I have an Iwata HP-B with .2mm tip but wanted something to shoot thicker airbrush paints and for color basecoating so got an Iwata Revolution B with .3mm tip. The Revolution was reasonably priced but has the same Iwata quality. I use an airbrush compressor that sits beside the work so it's easy to change pressure. If I used a tool compressor on the floor, a MAC valve on the airbrush would be a great feature. I frankly feel Iwata charges too much it. If I wanted MAC, I'd think about buying an NBI "Iwata clone". Guys seem to like them OK and you can't beat the prices. JMHO

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The beauty of having the separate MAC valve that attaches to the hose is that if you also use quick change adaptors on your airbrushes then only one MAC valve will be needed. It will go before the female adaptor section at the airbrush end of the air hose. The male end of the quick change attaches the the bottom of the airbrush itself.

I work with this set up and it's proven itself to be very handy indeed.

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Since we,re on the subject of iwata i have a few ques? I,ve got a eclipse HP-BCS /.5mm (siphon feed) which is nice for painting larger areas but was wondering if a .35 nozzle;needle would fit it for a little finer work. Also was looking at the microns the other day at a local shop, they want 268.00 for them seems like a good deal what do you guys think. Snax you use a micron what model do you have (needle size).I was thinking of getting the .2mm but not sure if i have to go that fine a set up or not,although i,m trying to get more detail in my lures around the head,gills etc, any advice or opinions would be appreciated. Thanks Jimbo

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Jimbo, the .35mm might fit but you'd also need the nozzle and the other front end parts to go with it and I personally consider a .35 tip as a "generalist" rather than a "detail" tip. And Iwata parts aren't cheap. I use an HP-B with .2mm tip for fine shading but when you start talking about fine details, I start thinking templates. I've never used a Micron but at $268 that's twice the price of an HP-B (new, on Ebay). A lot of detail work depends on technique, not the airbrush per se.

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Here's a link to a 'Iwata' supplier here-

Airbrushes

We have a few tariffs, duties etc and Japan is as close to here as there, so why are they so expensive?? some A.H is making a killing. You can see why 'FleaBay' is so attractive for the cheaper copies.

I do have a H.P which is about 35 y.o, and can still blast some paint, so I do think they are a quality tool, just can not come at paying around $300++++ for a new one. pete

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I will say that you don't need a Micron and a .2 needle set up to airbrush baits. I use it because I have it already and use it in my other airbrushing. I use it often on portraits to render facial hair and eye lashes etc.

Making a few simple templates is a far more effective way to render gills, fins etc. What I do use my micron for is for achieving very fine dots and stippling droplets. My own personal style of bait painting is detail oriented and the Micron for me is just another tool.It's not the answer to getting detail that another airbrush can't per se.

Learning to properly reduce your paints and lower your air pressure just right is key in getting up close to whatever you are airbrushing.

Edited by Snax

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Pete i checked that site holy smokes 700+ for a micron that guys way out of line. I do use templates but would like another brush for detail i bought a few knock off gravity feed .35mm that worked fine for a while but are just wore out now,i,ve even had rust around the trigger and can,t get parts for them etc. I,m really impressed with the iwata i have now so will stick with them. So a .2mm Hp-B gravity feed brush should do just fine and half the price of a micron,Hmmm maybe i can buy two. LOL. I certainly agree that air pressure, paint texture type of paint etc are important to a successful quality paint job and heaven knows i have lots of room for improvment in all those areas.As far as swapping parts on a iwata it was just a thought and was hoping someone on here had tried it. Thanks guys

Jimbo

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jimbo - I once swapped (just to check it out) my Iwata cap to a cheapo and it was the same thread, maybe the tip is the same.pete

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