SHOWMEBASSIN

Favorite Airbrush Paints

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I was wondering what everybody's favorite airbrush paint is. I paint with a paasche airbrush and have only used createx paints. They have worked well but after looking at some of the baits in the gallery I don't think I could get some of the results with createx. It might partly be the airbrush I am using or my lack of skill. Just looking for some suggestions to experiment with.

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Well, I use mostly Createx, some Auto Air, but some cheap stuff, and some I mix up from translucents mediums and powder.

I have never used your brand of air brush, but practice and more practice. I keep getting better and figure out more and more the more I practice and do and the more I ask some people how they do certain highlites etc. I have gotten a lot better and nothing changed, still use a middle of the road Iwata and a less expensive brand I use almost exclusively for transparents and basic opaques. i.e.: no pearls as the tip is too small But it does have a MAC valve which is very helpful in getting the finer detail applied.

But you are definetly correct that I see certain paint jobs done with lacquers that I know can't be done with acrylics and epoxy top coats. In fact I am about convinced if you want to paint certain brands of rattle traps etc. that you just about must use something besides what I am because of the sharp edges. But I don't have the space to get set up for major ventilation... so you do what you can.

But to your point I'd still like to know how a number of people to the gill fins with that are virtually transparent, yet have detailed lines in the fins. Check out the bottle openers, and you'll see what I mean.

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A Paasche VL will shoot about any kind of paint but you get better results with airbrush paints. Besides Createx, I use Smith Wildlife and Van Dyke Nature's Gallery paints about 50/50. If you mix brands to get particular colors, you can sometimes run into compatibility problems that cause clogging. But I haven't had problems with these 3 brands so far.

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Hi there,

The paints are not what is holding you back as Createx, Auto Air etc can all produce some incredibly fine details when properly reduced.

Getting fine control is the result of several factors...

1. Paint reduction: Use the appropriate reducer to thin out the paint. Use transparent paints for the finest details and work in light layers.

2. Air pressure: Lower the air pressure after reducing the paint to the correct viscosity for detailing. This will vary depending on the airbrush used and the paint type.

3. Proximity: Getting physically close to what you are painting is what ultimately allows the fine lines and spots etc. Only by experimenting with the first two factors can you then get in close and not get spidering or blow the paint everywhere.

4. Masking: The use of many types of masking such as freehand shields, paper, mylar etc will keep overspray from muddying things up. I use many different items to create different effects on my baits. Experimenting is key in getting the results you're after.

5. PRACTICE: After learning how to reduce,lower the air pressure and get in nice and close you need to put in some hours of practice. It takes steady hands and confidence in your abilities to get the level of detail that your equipment is capable of.

As for the actual airbrush I use Iwata airbrushes and have different ones for different situations. My Micron is awesome at detailing but will not shoot pearls or metallics well. For that I'll use the HP-CH or Kustom CS. The MAC valve (Micro Air Control) is a wonderful tool for dialing down the air pressure to the point where you can get the tiniest details and then quickly up the pressure to blast out any build up.

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Thanks for the suggestions. I think I will try some taxidermy paints for some more natural colors. I know a taxidermist pretty well who could probably hook me up. I would really like to figure out my detailing issues so I could paint up some custom craw colored wigglewarts for early spring. I just have problems spraying the fine lines for the segmentation.

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craw segments - that why God created painting templates! To freehand stuff like that, you not only have to be GOOD, you have to be good TWICE in mirror image! Or you can be a duffer like me and resort to some frisket material, a pencil and an Xacto knife to make a painting template. The factories use them, why not us?

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Hi there,

The paints are not what is holding you back as Createx, Auto Air etc can all produce some incredibly fine details when properly reduced.

Getting fine control is the result of several factors...

1. Paint reduction: Use the appropriate reducer to thin out the paint. Use transparent paints for the finest details and work in light layers.

2. Air pressure: Lower the air pressure after reducing the paint to the correct viscosity for detailing. This will vary depending on the airbrush used and the paint type.

3. Proximity: Getting physically close to what you are painting is what ultimately allows the fine lines and spots etc. Only by experimenting with the first two factors can you then get in close and not get spidering or blow the paint everywhere.

4. Masking: The use of many types of masking such as freehand shields, paper, mylar etc will keep overspray from muddying things up. I use many different items to create different effects on my baits. Experimenting is key in getting the results you're after.

5. PRACTICE: After learning how to reduce,lower the air pressure and get in nice and close you need to put in some hours of practice. It takes steady hands and confidence in your abilities to get the level of detail that your equipment is capable of.

As for the actual airbrush I use Iwata airbrushes and have different ones for different situations. My Micron is awesome at detailing but will not shoot pearls or metallics well. For that I'll use the HP-CH or Kustom CS. The MAC valve (Micro Air Control) is a wonderful tool for dialing down the air pressure to the point where you can get the tiniest details and then quickly up the pressure to blast out any build up.

I agree 3000%!

You have to know your paint. I use Auto Air with a Passche VL and siphon feed qick change caps with no problems on detail or fine cuts. Remember also that different colors require different reduction and pressure. I mark bottles of certain colors with a sharpie at what pressure that color sprays best at. Also, when I get a new bottle, I'll adjust the viscosity by spraying fine lines on a blank paper until I get it dialed in. I know that if I dial in fine lines, broader work is no problem. A-#1 rule though for some fine detail................ as mentioned before..........know when to give up on freehand! I nab all the old business cards destined for the garbage at my 9-5 job every time they change logos or fire someone. Those cards and an x-acto work wonders for making detail masks. I'll cut the same detail on all 4 sides in different sizes for different baits.

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You'll probably laugh at this but I can tell from the sound of the air coming out of my airbrush before I even spray anything how it will come out. This is after several years of airbrushing and really getting in tune with my paint and equipment.

You just get to know how a proper air pressure sounds for each airbrush over time. I couldn't even guess what air pressure I spray at because it changes all the time depending on if I'm detailing with thicker paints or detailing with overly reduced paints.

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Are Createx and Auto Aire made by the same company?

Yep. Regular Createx is their fabric and general art paint. AutoAir is the automotive grade line with higher quality binder and pigments.

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That's what I thought.

I received a sample of both the white and black wicked colors, along with a bottle of reducer (by the way, thank you Snax for that contact).

I've only used the white so far, and I really like it. Nice shine.

And it's water based, so I can use my regular painting setup and system.

I'm not sure I'd want to venture into water borne paints. I'm familiar with water borne floor urethanes, and the fumes are nasty for the first hour.

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Mark,

The Wicked and Auto-Borne are the exact same paint. Just packaged differently to make them more attractive to the two different markets and to avoid people thinking that they are only an automotive paint.

You're welcome for the contact by the way. Craig Kennedy from Auto Air and I have a great working relationship and I'm very fortunate to be one of the folks that they listen to when testing new products before they are released. They are really on top of their game.

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Well then, the water borne paints have little or no fumes, and work well with water based paints. At least so far.

I guess ignorance is bliss.

You're right about Craig. He is a real pleasure to deal with, and they make good stuff.

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