rclark12

SWIM BAIT STEPS... help

8 posts in this topic

when making swim baits with eye screws and wire shaft .. what is the best step by step process... after i have it all cut but unpainted and undrilled what should i do... drill the holes for wire shaft paint epoxy then put together or put together then paint and epoxy?

i would greatly appreciate if some one would tell me the best aproach to this:)Thanks

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it would proly be easier to epoxy with the bait taken apart.. put the screw eyes in but dont lock them together paint it and epoxy the pieces seperatly it should make it easier... if you do it with the bait together it might plug up the eye holes

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I install the screw eyes and adjust them to get the joint spacing I want. Then I reinstall them with epoxy, using one screw eye in the pair to set the depth for the other. Then I assemble the lure and paint, with the hinge pins not pushed all the way into place.

Then I take it back apart, and coat the insides of each section's joints with Devcon 2 Ton (D2T) epoxy while they're still apart. I use the D2T because it's stiffer, so I can coat the joints, and hang the pieces up to set without having to put them on my drying wheel. I just don't put it on too thick, or it will run and sag. It's really not necessary to have a really thick coating for the inside faces of the joints, since all it does is protect the paint from water.

I lap the D2T up onto the faces of the sections about 1/4" so my top coat will have a good overlap.

After the D2T sets, I reassemble the bait, put it on my drying wheel, and put my Nu Lustre 55 top coat on the rest of the bait.

I always put on a second coat of Nu Lustre after 24 hours.

Before I fish a jointed lure, I coat the inside faces of the joints with some sort of fish attractant, like Megastrike, to take away any stickiness that the fresh epoxy might have. You can use vasoliine.

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I would reccomend making your joint cuts while your material is still square and in block form. Just don't cut it apart completely. I would also reccomend drilling your pin hole at this point. It is much easier drilling straight holes and making square cuts when the stock is in a square block form. Then, cut your profile and shape your bait as one piece. Once this process is complete, finish cutting the joints all the way through and separate the sections and add your hardware. As far as the finish goes, you almost have to coat each piece individualy and rotate while drying. I will try to find a pic of my setup that will show you how i set them up to rotate.

TJ

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I would reccomend making your joint cuts while your material is still square and in block form. Just don't cut it apart completely. I would also reccomend drilling your pin hole at this point. It is much easier drilling straight holes and making square cuts when the stock is in a square block form. Then, cut your profile and shape your bait as one piece. Once this process is complete, finish cutting the joints all the way through and separate the sections and add your hardware. As far as the finish goes, you almost have to coat each piece individualy and rotate while drying. I will try to find a pic of my setup that will show you how i set them up to rotate.

TJ

Thanks tht is a completely new proces to me.. do u make muskie/saltwater swim baits or freshwater...

im wondering wut size wood block to use for muskie and saltwater not sure how wide/thick to make the biat

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i think im going to stick to 1" wide... easier for me to know the cut needs to be 1/2 " through .. by the way do you use a band saw or scroll saw... and what are the drill bits i need for the pin whole

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i think im going to stick to 1" wide... easier for me to know the cut needs to be 1/2 " through .. by the way do you use a band saw or scroll saw... and what are the drill bits i need for the pin whole

If you're going to laminate two pieces, buy the wood or PVC already milled to 1/2". Save time and materials.

The most accurate way to split a thick piece of wood is with a table saw, but you lose the thickness of the blade.

The size of the pin hole is determined by the diameter of the pin.

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