spoopa

Spot placement

33 posts in this topic

lets do an experiment! for you guys south of the permafrost line make a lure that actually has 2 eyes on its side, full detail eyes. Also, make one with a normal kill spot and one with no spot. If you hybrid guys are trolling than this experiment would have less angler biasness since you can have all 3 in the water and no skill level as a factor. I'd love to hear if the big fish theory holds true for a lure with a full detail eye for a kill spot.

:twocents:

Aside from this, when making a lure your best interest is to match the fish from that particular body of water. For instance, a creek chub has a dark line transcending posteriorly approximately where its lateral line is, if its in clear water. A creek chub in stained or muddy water has a very lite resemblence of a line (you can see it if you hold the fish at different angles). As a result, I make two different creek chub patterns and throw them based on water clarity.

Here is something else that is interesting, I took a black nose dace and put it in a white bucket... the colors fade and are practically absent in comparison to the SAME fish that was removed from a creek (w/ a dark bottom) 5 minutes before. I've been sampling agriculture ditches and creeks for Purdue for the last year so I took the oportunity to apply what I've learned to my fishing... heck, its not everyday you get to go fishing w/ electricity:wink:

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@ Spoopa

Right on my man! At least your baits are catching them! I still believe that you need to do what gives you confidence! If the spot catches bigger fish then thats what I would stay with!! I love fishing the P-lo rws I have caught manybig walleyes, wipers, spotted bass, Smallies and crappies. What bait shop are you located in?

@Bobp

Hey Bob I worked with the Colo Div. of wildlife biologists and asked them this very question. They stated that they are a "false Eye" and ment to confuse predators!

Jason

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@ jflures

My lures arent in any baitshops yet, but i do have one repaint and working on a couple others as a i speak. But the bait shop that ill sell at is off of McCulloch, by the rocky mountain boat store. But the Pueblo resavoir is a great place to fish. I was introduced to topwater action on the wipers and then my dad told me that i should make a topwater and since then ive been going away at it.

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I know where that bait shop is!! That topwater action for wipers is alot of fun out there! You should also try your topwaters for the Spots in shallow water, they love to tear up topwaters!!!:yay:

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There is a fish here called 'Fingermark Bream', which has a large spot towards the tail, it is also called amongst other names, "Moses Perch", and the spot is said to be Moses thumb print (he must have had 2 thumbs on each hand). Beautiful fish to catch and eat, and gets to about 20lb - I have never caught one.

Thinking of the spot on the rear of this fish, I can see this may be a decoy, to attract an attacker to the rear of the fish instead of the head, thus allowing a fish to directly retreat, without having to turn around to escape?? In the link below they say the spot changes, with the mood of the fish which may be a breeding attraction, or just a moody female???? All food for thought!!

Pete

Fish note - Fingermark (Lutjanus johnii)

fingermark3.jpg[/img]

fingermark1.jpg[/img]

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All females change color when they are in a bad mood. I don't think they are trying to attract a mate,'cos my instinct tells me to go to the bar and play some pool. Or maybe that is what caused the color change. Not sure, it's all very confusing.

Dave

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Well I think we can conclude that kill spots represent different meanings on different fish.

:?My prediction for the spot being on the back of a fish would try and get its predetors to attack from the rear. If the fish has spines (like the fingermark bream) a posterior attack could easily be lethal for a predator (kind of like choking). Ever seen a dead bass w/ a bluegill stuck in its throat? they are normally being consumed tail first.

As for the poor threadfin having a kill spot more toward the head, it has no spines to prevent a rear attack. So a head attack is just putting itself out of its misery. Bon app

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I think everyone got it a little right.

Like Dave said, these things evolve for some kind of a purpose that increases survival, so the feature is passed on to the next generation.

In the case of threadfin shad, and almost all schooling "baitfish" with false eye spots, the spot creates a false image, making the school appear larger and more confusing to focus an attack on. So, in that case, the spot is for survival from attack in a group.

In the case of the Bream family, and other fish that don't school tightly, but do share areas as groups, it's probably a sexual display for mating. Ever notice how fishes colors get fired up during mating season?

In the case of trout, which are basically a predator, the spots are for camouflage, to let them blend in with their surroundings when they're on the hunt. Same with the bars and patterns on bass, and the white bottom/dark top on almost all predator fish.

There are lots of salt water reef fish that are brightly colored to advertise that they are poisonous. Or really horny!

Anyway, I just try to simulate the color scheme of the local preyfish, or whatever I'm trying to imitate with my lure, not match it exactly. That kind of paint job I leave to the guys here who can really paint. :worship:

My lures, even the floaters, are basically reaction baits. If the lure has a shape and size that's close to the prey, and a decent action and color scheme, it will be eaten.

Fish aren't geniuses. Fishermen are far more picky than any bass. :lol:

Well I think we can conclude that kill spots represent different meanings on different fish.

:?My prediction for the spot being on the back of a fish would try and get its predetors to attack from the rear. If the fish has spines (like the fingermark bream) a posterior attack could easily be lethal for a predator (kind of like choking). Ever seen a dead bass w/ a bluegill stuck in its throat? they are normally being consumed tail first.

As for the poor threadfin having a kill spot more toward the head, it has no spines to prevent a rear attack. So a head attack is just putting itself out of its misery. Bon app

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