muskietom51

sealed bait ready for weights

9 posts in this topic

ok i have sealed my bait an screw eyes are sealed also, no i want to add lead to the hooks an see what kind of sink rate i get correct? Tell me I dont want to drill holes for the lead before i put it in a bucket. Even after i pour the lead do i need to seal the holes before i drop it in the bucket correct. Sorry working on a glide bait like a sink rate about 6inches a sec I think.

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@ muskietom51

Do you intend to pour the molten lead into holes in the belly of your lure ?

I have heard about this method from some Dutch and Belgian guys , but haven't done it myself .

They'd drill holes after estimated diameter and depth(or known by experience)and pour lead in .

Now they rig the lure and tank-test it , off course it should sink more or less fast and also level .

Now they drill out as much lead off the bores as required to achieve desired sink rate and level .

I do it different :

I'd rig the lure with hooks and a leader substitute(bigger paperclip) and first hang a kinked stripe of roofing lead sheet(approx. 3/5" X 7") onto the belly hook and test in a water bucket .

I'd shorten that stripe , until desired sink rate is achieved .

Now I use the stripe as a stencil to cut out a second stripe of same size .

Now I cut first stripe apart at about 3/5 to 4/7 of length and roll the two parts up to real tight rolls .

I'd stick these onto the belly fore and aft with plastic cable insulation tape to check for proper sink level .

Have to tinker a bit with locations , also shortening lead rolls probably .

This is why I have cut a second stripe , so that I would have spare material , in case I cut one too short .

When I'm satisfied , I'd comprime the rolls a bit with a hammer(under constant rolling to keep 'em round , first one side , after the other side) , drill approbiate holes at the previously marked locations and glue in the weights .

The sink rate you can easily estimate in that water bucket , but remember , that drilling weight holes and the final topcoats would render the sinkrate a little faster , since the lure gets a little heavier .

For example , if you want a real slow sinking lure , you weigh it in your bucket still with its back sticking out just a little fraction , the finished bait would then sink quite slow .

Off course , you could do it in a very similar way as well with mold-cast cylindrical weights .

After having determined about the weighting this way , I glue the ballast in , period , so no need to seal any holes , 'cause my bait won't hit the waters again unless completely done !

good luck:yay: , diemai

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After years of weighting glide baits I can usually get it pretty close on the first try. I drill two or three connecting holes with a forstner bit deep enough to reach the center line of the lure about an inch in from each end of the glider. This is how I was taught by Jed from Bikinibaits and he's the master!

If I need to balance the bait after melting in the lead I drill a little out with the same forstner bit on my drill press. Then just fill in the bit of space with epoxy putty before sanding for primer and airbrushing.

I should point out that I always seal the wood after drilling out those holes for the lead and before melting it in. That way when you tank test for balance the water won't seep into the wood. It's better to have the holes a little too deep than not deep enough as it's easier to remove lead rather than having to ream all the lead out and drill deeper.

Have fun!

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snax i gave your way a try. I think I came pretty close i ended up using the bits being careful not to go past the centerline of the bait. laid it in the bucket it sank about 6 to 8 inches a sec an when it hit bottom it stayed upright. I'll post results if i find open water lmao

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Glad I was able to help Tom. I look forward to hearing how she works.

Sounds like it should be fine from what you posted.

Out of curiosity, what is the length and thickness of the bait. I don't recall now if it was mentioned in your earlier posts.

Oh, by the way, if you decide to buy an electric lead melter like I use, save all your lead shavings. They add up pretty quickly after you've balanced and drilled a few batches of baits. I get my lead for free from a place that balances car tires. They give me the lead and I use the lead melting machine to melt off the metal tabs. They float to the top in molten lead where they are easily scooped out with a large metal spoon with holes in it.

Edited by Snax

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the bait is 7 inches long an 15/16 thick cedar. I lost my ladel for pouring small amounts od lead so I used some dowels I made a few years back then twicked as i went along. The forstner bits were a big help. You have any ideas what else i could use as a lead ladel

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For that length of glider the optimal thickness would be about 3/4" for it to have a nice glide. Jed and I have both experimented over the years with wood thickness and lure lengths and for sure if the bait is too thin for a given length it won't glide at all.

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what! they make a lead melter!? you mean i dont have to sit over the stove with the lead weights sitting in a spoon! ill defently have to look into those..

whats the difference between a glider bait and a walk the dog bait?? is it the same thing just east coast west coast lingo? also you making a sinking glider? so it walks under the surface? interesting:?

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@ matt duarte

It seems to me , that the lure terminology is a bit confusing , even around the United States only , not to talk about adding Europe to the game !

I'd say , that a glider bait and a "walk-the-dog" bait have about the same action , only the glider bait sinks and runs under the surface .

Naturally , depending on each lure model , it can dart to ANY direction , whereas the topwater obviously only darts left/right .

To complicate matters more , in Europe we do use English terms for such different styles of lures , but these are obviously not the same like yours over there .

A sinking glider we would simply call a "jerkbait" , a "walk-the-dog" topwater lure a "stickbait" .

The lipped minnow baits , that you call "jerkbaits" over there , we would call "twitchbaits" or just "wobbler"(general term for lipped lures) .

All a bit confusing:eek::eek::eek:!

Greetz , diemai

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