bbduc

Router Table Technique

9 posts in this topic

When I run baits through on my router table to do say a .25" or .375" shoulder or belly occasionally when I get to the nose or tail I'll get some tear out or chunk the wood. Not to mention when the wood jumps around like that all I think about is a finger getting messed up.

I start by tracing the basic form on a squared piece of wood drill any holes for thru-wire or lead if I know the exact amounts needed.

I then take the bait to the band saw and cut the form and then onto the router table.

I move the bait from right-to-left but when I get the nose I sometimes get tear out. I've seen guys on youtube show how they do it and they are just whipping through the wood with no problems, all free-hand as I do.

I was reading the "swim bait joints" thread in the forum and Snax mentioned clamps. What are you guys doing, are you using clamps or a different technique?

Any help appreciated.

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Hi Bob,

I use a quick release wood clamp that has plastic jaws. I freehand almost all my routered edges though but I will use the clamp on smaller sections for safety reasons.

I use it when band sawing small pieces too and it's great for holding swimbait sections in the perfect orientation while cutting angles.

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Some time back, I bought a rubber mat from Sears that you just put on the work bench and put piece to routered out on the mat. It holds the wood in place and keeps the fingers away from the router bit completely. It's low tech, but it works.

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Hi Bob

I have been using a router table now for around a year and I appreciate exactly your problem. The answer is simple. Use very high quality router bits, do not skimp. For hardwoods use the router on the highest speed possible, only lower the speed for softer woods. Technique is of paramount importance as well, you need a fluid motion to turning the bait against the bit and always keep it firm against the roller bearing if you do not it will bounce and take out chunks of wood. Confidence is the key without throwing caution to the wind. That position on the lure is the hardest to route as you are feeding the body round a very tight radius and I admit my heart always skips a beat at that moment :eek:. Position your digits behind the direction of rotation and not in front to increase the safety factor.

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Hi Bob

I have been using a router table now for around a year and I appreciate exactly your problem. The answer is simple. Use very high quality router bits, do not skimp.

Thanks Phil. I think the high quality bits may be part of my problem, that and confidence through practice. I picked a marginal at best pack of 6 bits at a equally cheap price. I'll have to pick up a couple new bits and give it a go. :yay:

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read this thread before going to the shed and i think it jinxed me,as phil has mentioned you need good bit's and mines comeing to the end of it's life after i'd guess around 500 baits have been over it.i always find you get a rougher section on each side of the lure due i think to going against the grain which is where a sharp bit helps

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I'm pretty sure I understand what is happening.

I've seen where the router bit hits right at the grain of the wood. I bet if you look at the split it is right at the grain.

Even if is not a little trick that may help you.

Put a scrap piece of wood at the end of your working piece, thus now your working piece has no end. OMG it even sounds confusing to me.

Ok, take a 1 x 1 pice of wood. Now put a scrap piece on the end. The scrap piece is now the end of your working wood and who cares if the router chunks it out.

I know what I am talking about but I am even confusing myself reading this reply. Sorry guys not the most articulate pencil in the box.

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I'm pretty sure I understand what is happening.

I've seen where the router bit hits right at the grain of the wood. I bet if you look at the split it is right at the grain.

That's exactly what's happening. Thanks for the tip. I'll give it a try tomorrow. That combined with a decent bit should have me heading in the right direction.

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