trollscot

Humididy level and Propionate

9 posts in this topic

Is there a "magic" level you should stay under when trying to get a clear finish with Propionate. I thought of getting a dehumidifier in my workshop and when it reaches the "right" level start doing the final coat on my lures.

Any ideas Propionate Guru's:):)

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No need for the dehumidifier unless you just need to dry the shop out.

Read any of the 3 below and you will have your answer.

If the temperature is below 35 fahrenheit where you are then start dipping and it should dry clear with out the jar.

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I think that all three of these links will give the same solution to the problem.

You should be able to find the answer by the highlighted words. They are also good reads for propionate.

Topcoat Issues Reply #6

Propionate mixture Reply #27

Propionate Wood Sealer Reply #4

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When i am making lures i will be doing batches of 30+ lures at a time i cant really have 30 odd jars taking up worktop space while the top coat dries.

You said if you work below 35deg, what about if i use an old fridge and hang bait from the racks in the fridge, it will be below 35deg in there , do you think that will work better?

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I just spent 30 min. writing a whole new essay on my testing results only to hit the wring button and now it is all lost.

To sum it up.

Hanging the baits in the freezer did not work for me the first time so I gave up on that.

The jars should still work fine for you because the bait only needs to hang in it for a minute or so and only on the final dip. 3 jars and you will be in business, after 1 minute take them out of the jar and hang them on the regular drying rack until dry.

Recent temperatures (night lows in the upper teens and day high in the low 40's) has reduced the humidity to about 30%. At this humidity level I can go into the garage and dip topcoats or sealer layers and the propionate will dry clear on every dip, just hanging on the open rack.

So... Mr. Owl, At what humidity level will the propionate and acetone dry clear? Aaa 30%.

This is not an exact science for me but it works. It might dry clear at 40% I don't know because I have never checked the humidity level till just now and 30% is working.

If you get the dehumidifier please let us know what the magic number is because I am curious.

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I started working with prop. last year.

I was just discussing this subject with a friend that this could be the single best sealing method in the winter.

I appreciate you guys putting in all of this information.

We are working on wad style needles and will seal them with prop. in a couple of days. I would like, for once, to not have blushing. I did read about the jars and the drops of acetone in the jars etc. I am happy to hear they only need to be in jar for a couple minutes if at all in low humidity.

Thanks guys

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You can avoid the hassle of the jar or dehumidifier just by using a different solvent with the acetone. I checked and got you guys a PPG code for the MAK solvent. It's PPG solvent Q70. Try that at 10:1 acetone to Q70, and you should be all set! :)

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Downriver,

So, the MAK is used to slow the cure of a solvent based clear, like propionate, correct? If this is the case, would someone using propionate as a clear coat with the addition of MAK then need to put the lure on a turner since it would take longer to set up? As far as I am aware it is not necessary to turn prop-coated lures as they are currently being done by most here (dissolved in acetone or lacquer thinner); would it be necessary with the MAK because of the increased cure time?

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No need for a turner. It will just increase the cure time a bit, but won't affect how it sets up much at all. By the time it normally takes for the acetone to get out as usually, about half the MAK will be gone. So if you think about a 95% proprionate : 5% solvent mix, it's going to be a solid.

I can't guarantee it, but it MIGHT actually cure faster! A huge no-no in coatings is to use a single solvent. It causes a number of issues, including blushing. As far as curing, one solvent usually"case-hardens" the coating on the surface and chokes off the evaporation of the solvent underneath. Having multiple solvents in there helps keep the surface open and lets everything evaporate quicker.

Edited by Downriver Tackle

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