diemai

Looks that simple the Finnish way !

47 posts in this topic

Someone has posted these videos part 1+2 on a German luremaking site .

Looks very interesting to me , especially the foiling between two sponges and the glitter plating in a glass jar .

Guess , that I even own a lure made by this guy , swapped with Finnish friends , since it looks much like one hanging in his drying rack .

Part 1 :

YouTube - Making Wobblers by hand Part 1

Part 2 :

YouTube - Making Wobblers by hand Part 2

Enjoy:) ! greetz :yay:, diemai

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Diemai,

I have watched the videos without sound. Maybe the answer of my question is already there. Anyway, do you know what type of wood he uses? It looks more like cheese to me. I wonder what we would need things like scroll saws, band saws, disc/belt/drum sanders for?

I liked the way he made the lipslot. There's lot of literature on this forum about how to cut the lip slot, how to make jigs to this end, etc.

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@ rofish

I don't have sound to it either , but the way the wood looks and acts when cutting it , I am 100% sure , that it is medium dense balsa , all of the homemade Finnish lures , that I have swapped with guys from over there , are made of it , anyway .

I am also amazed about the simplicity of the working process , and luckily I own a few results of that , you probably could already call it folk art , Finnish lurecarving .

greetz :yay:, diemai

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These are great videos, diemai, thank you for posting them. The simplicity is inspiring, especially the knife work.

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Diemai, Those are inspiring. I also heard the word Balsa. It was the only word I understood. I liked the slotted belly and the way he thru wired.

Thanks John

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diemai-thanks for those videos, no problem not having sound, because you would not be able to understand him, the camera man sounded Scottish, or some English dialect, but I could not understand him either. He makes it look so easy, why is it I always make it seem so hard???? pete

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@ RiverMan

Do you mean , that you can't get the video ?

Just tried it again with above links , it works for me !

greetz:yay: , diemai

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Anyway, do you know what type of wood he uses? It looks more like cheese to me.

It is balsa. Other very popular lurebuilding wood here (for cranks) is apache (sorry, don't know for sure does I wrote it right), which is a bit harder than balsa. I like it more.

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I really like the glitter technique (really simple, too). Only thing about it that I haven't quite wrapped my head around is it appears, at least to me, that he dips in propionate, then does the glitter coat. But the acetone/lacquer thinner in a propionate dip damage the glitter? Is it a special kind of glitter, or is he dipping in something else?

I am finding his prop dip into primer dip interesting as well; anyone else do something like that?

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diemai,

Those are some sweet videos, I always find it fascinating to watch others lure makers at work.

Does anyone know what kind of tool he is using to cut the slot in for the through-wire? I'm going to be building some through wire baits soon and that looks like a good idea to me! I guess I could use a thin hacksaw blade or a skill saw blade. Anyone have any other ideas?

diemai, thanks again for the inspiring videos.:worship:

jeremy

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But the acetone/lacquer thinner in a propionate dip damage the glitter? Is it a special kind of glitter, or is he dipping in something else?

I think it is just metallick glitter which they sell here in the lurebuilding shop called "Samfishing" (Samfishing -> "Tuotteet"-> "Vaapputarvikkeet").

Does anyone know what kind of tool he is using to cut the slot in for the through-wire?

He used blade of steel saw for that and the piece of wood, which he used, had that wire hole already.

Steel saw is the easiest way to saw those wire holes yourself, just use little "rougher" blade.

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@ SmokeyJ

Sorry , haven't used this methods of dipping before , but I am quite sure that no dip nor cleargloss of whatever kind would damage those glitter flakes , they are just very tiny pieces of metal , aren't they:? ?

@ Jwags

Obviously the guy is using a metal saw blade , as Jio stated .

I have tried to cut balsa before with an ordinary woodsaw , seemingly the teeth are too large/rough for the soft material , they bite into it , you use more force and as a result the edges of the cut become improper , not clean and woodgrain tears away !

That fine-toothed metal saw blade is much better suited for balsa , it may take some more time , but the cuts are clean .

@ Jio

Nice , that you have joined this thread , being one of those skilled Finnish lurecarvers:) !

greetz:yay: , diemai

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@ SmokeyJ

Sorry , haven't used this methods of dipping before , but I am quite sure that no dip nor cleargloss of whatever kind would damage those glitter flakes , they are just very tiny pieces of metal , aren't they:? ?

Diemai,

Many glitters sold in the US are made of plastic with a mylar type coating on them, which was my concern about the glitter technique in the video. If the glitter is metal then you are right, there would be no concerns.

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Jwags, I think you have answered your own question. In my oppinion, he uses a hacksaw blade (a saw blade for metal). And I think he uses just an ordinary one, not a thin one as you intend to use. Just think: in case he would have used a thin one, would he been able to press the led sheet you see in that slot for the through wire? And would a very thin lead sheet be enough to ballast a balsa lure? But best would be that you try different thickness blades, to see which is best for your needs.

I would be concerned about other things, such as the fragility of such a lure. For instance, I do not know what kind of glue he uses for the wire, but obviously it is not a 2 component epoxy. So what will happen in case of a big strike (and fish)? The more so as the tail section is very thin. Or is this lure designed as a one fish lure?

Anyway, one must try this method to see for himself.

Edited by rofish

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@ SmokeyJ

I haven't considered about that , sorry !

Guess there won't be nothing left to do but try the glitter flakes in the dips solvents first , and if they do dissolve , one needs to chance the method/laquer or the glitter flakes for glitter plating .

@ Jio

Maybe you can say something to it ?

You have already mentioned , that it was metallic glitter , but is it REALLY metal ? I am not so sure anymore after Smokey's statement :huh:!

@ rofish

To me that glue looks like ordinary woodglue with it's white color , such glue does not bind with metall , usually .

I would at least use an allround glue , if not my two-component glue .

I have a few of those handmade Finnish lures , the smaller ones are indeed made to fish for salmon and trout .

But consisting of balsa you would wonder about their rigidity , especially their rock hard surfaces , that really do reinforce the balsa .

A lure , that was designed and built for pike fishing , won't get destroyed even by the biggest one !

Believe me , the Finnish know , what they are doing about their luremaking , brand names like "Rapala" , "Nils Master" and "Turus Ukko" are evidence enough to me .

greetz:yay: , diemai

Edited by diemai
adding text

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In my oppinion, he uses a hacksaw blade (a saw blade for metal). And I think he uses just an ordinary one, not a thin one as you intend to use. Just think: in case he would have used a thin one, would he been able to press the led sheet you see in that slot for the through wire? And would a very thin lead sheet be enough to ballast a balsa lure? But best would be that you try different thickness blades, to see which is best for your needs.

I would be concerned about other things, such as the fragility of such a lure. For instance, I do not know what kind of glue he uses for the wire, but obviously it is not a 2 component epoxy. So what will happen in case of a big strike (and fish)? The more so as the tail section is very thin. Or is this lure designed as a one fish lure?

Anyway, one must try this method to see for himself.

-I Still belive he uses piece of metal saw for sawing. The lead he use is ca. 1 mm (0,04 inch) thick (I've used same too), so it's very easy to put to the slot because balsa is also little flexible. The glue looks like water resistant wood glue, which is very popular here for trough wired lures, biggest salmons which are catched here every year by this kind of lures are over 20 kg (ca. 50 lbs).

The lead there is not for make the lure sinking, for ballasting it's just enough. Don't forget that the lure gonna get treble to it's belly too.

Videos do not show well, that the lure get many covers of lacque, which make it harder and durable.

Lures blank look like it's built for zander, but don't know for sure.

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Jio

Maybe you can say something to it ?

You have already mentioned , that it was metallic glitter , but is it REALLY metal ? I am not so sure anymore after Smokey's statement :huh:!

Samfishing sell that glitter as a "Metallic glitter", I've still used myself all kind of glitters (and all of them are not metallic) without problems. Of course it's better first test it before the use.

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Hi , folks , here is another nice one from Finland , not a video this time , though .

Came across it yesterday , it is a step-by-step picture sequence showing the construction of a fine , wooden swimbait .

The author/builder hit it very smart , there is no text involved requiring translation , and still the single working steps are clear to follow(OK , maybe not about the eyes , I don't quite understand that:huh::huh:) .

He really did a good job on this one:yes: !

KALAMIES.COM :: N

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