diemai

Looks that simple the Finnish way !

47 posts in this topic

A good one. That is so clear and easy to follow without sound.

Thanks again Diemai

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Daemai - say no more, you don't have to it's all there and beautiful work it is too.

Here's some more, this is the last page (225), just work your way back and see some classic euro lure makers. I lost this site in a crash about one year back, and have been looking for it ever since, thanks Daemai. pete

http://www.kalamies.com/foorumi/viewtopic.php?t=32&postdays=0&postorder=asc&start=5600

Edited by hazmail
add link ???

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Diemai,

You and others say it is quite simple to understand the process by just looking at the pictures, with one single exception - the eyes.

Well, it seems that my small wheels in my head would need a little greasing.

Can you explain how he passes from step 10 to the next?

So let's suppose he screwed in both screw eyes in one section. What would he do next to come to the result in picture 11?

To my understanding, there are only 2 ways to get the result you see.

1) He does not screw in the opposite screws of the interlocked screw eyes, he just pushes them into the holes, using epoxy.

2) He unbends the eyes of the opposite screw eyes, so as to be able to free them from being linked to the others, then he can srew them into the premade holes, and then he uses some small pliers, I guess, to interlock the screw eyes again. Or he could screw in just one screw (the "third") and then when he comes to the "fourth" he would have to unbend it first.

Is there a better explanation? Maybe yes. I would very much like to hear it.

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@ rofish

I am sure , that he took picture 10 only to display the way of connection .

I have made two or three lures so far connected this way , and I did it as you have described in your statement #2 , so glueing in the eyes before , leaving them open in one section and bending them close with narrow pliers after connecting the sections .

I can truly say , that this is quite finacky , and also requires very accurate positioning of the opposing pilot holes for widest possible swing of the hinge without binding .

But since the eyes here appear to be a bit countersunk(thus the sections get closer together) , I also wonder , whether he did it this way , since you need a certain space between the sections to get inbetween with the pliers :yay:!

So it can also be possible , that he has done it like your option #1 , and if it should be so , I wonder , whether the bond would hold up just epoxying the screweyes into bigger holes ?

And you cannot connect one pair of eyes and try to close the open eye of the second pair inside the opposing one , since there is not enough play in the first connection to poke through the second open eye , I've tried this before !

Probably he has only epoxied ONE eye in , but I haven't tried this before either .

There might the problem again to guide it inside it's hole due to unsufficient play of the already connected sections(with first pair of eyes) .

But I really can't tell , and there hardly would be different possibilities , I guess :huh::??

You are a good observer , this problem hasn't crossed my mind so far :huh:!

@ hazmail

There are indeed some fine examples of Finnish luremaking displayed in there !

Most of these are not made for pike , but for trout and salmon .

Finland has a lot of forrests and lakes and only about 4,5 millions citizens , the landscape and climate you could compare to Canada .

One German angling magazine once stated , that , just by numbers , every citizen would have one fishing water for himself , a bit over the top , though , but much truth in it !

greetz , diemai

Edited by diemai
addition of text

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....snipped (OK , maybe not about the eyes , I don't quite understand that:huh::huh:) .

snip....

2 part epoxy + red pigment + glitter mixed and used I don't know what is that little cup (could be a powder measuring spoon used by pharmacists) as mold to mold the eye.

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Diemai,

You and others say it is quite simple to understand the process by just looking at the pictures, with one single exception - the eyes.

Well, it seems that my small wheels in my head would need a little greasing.

Can you explain how he passes from step 10 to the next?

So let's suppose he screwed in both screw eyes in one section. What would he do next to come to the result in picture 11?

To my understanding, there are only 2 ways to get the result you see.

1) He does not screw in the opposite screws of the interlocked screw eyes, he just pushes them into the holes, using epoxy.

2) He unbends the eyes of the opposite screw eyes, so as to be able to free them from being linked to the others, then he can srew them into the premade holes, and then he uses some small pliers, I guess, to interlock the screw eyes again. Or he could screw in just one screw (the "third") and then when he comes to the "fourth" he would have to unbend it first.

Is there a better explanation? Maybe yes. I would very much like to hear it.

Look at picture 37, notice closed screw eye and open screw eye? That should answer your question.;)

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Man, that site is great. Keep finding all sorts of cool stuff.

Hey, wasn't somebody asking about how to make jigging raps about a month ago? There is a 48 page topic on it over there.

Wish I spoke Finnish b/c the google translate is sorely lacking :)

Anyone know how the action is on the plugs with the cupped lips? Only thing I have seen similar to that are some of hazmail's plugs.

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@ LaPala

Thanks for your explanation about the eyes , I have thought about something similar , but now you have provided details about how to make such eyes , thanks a lot , also for your hint about the screweye connection , one should really look closer :huh:;):)!

@ SmokeyJ

We can buy these jigs as well over here , I even have some as well , but never tried to build them at home .

That "V" shaped tailfin causes them to sink down in circular movements , not just drop straight .

Truly , that translation sucks , worst one , I've ever seen:( !

But I guess , no one speaks Finnish except the Finnish people themselves , its a language of its own , only slightly related to Hungarian , but to no other European language , not the Latin-based ones , nor the German/Scandinavian/English language family .

I have a few of such lures with those typical Finnish "saddle lips"(translated from a German term) , hard for me to tell about their action , probably one would need two equal lures with different lips to be able to compare and figure out about subtle differences .

As far as I can say , these lips do not provide deeper diving , I guess , 7 to 9 feet would be the absolute limit , depending on size and buoancy of the lure .

The baits equipped with these lips are most likely of slender body shape and have a more or less oval cross-section , but some are also flat and curved , a little bit shaped like flounders .

But what this lip actually does , is to prevent too much sideward roll of the bait around its lenght axis , they would rather move their heads/tails left and right , also these flat ones do that .

This is the only significance , that I can tell on a short term, and just only due to your question , haven't even thought over it before :lol:!

greetz :yay:, diemai

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Look at picture 37, notice closed screw eye and open screw eye? That should answer your question.;)

Yes, you are right (again ! :mad::lol:)

I just looked at one picture instead of looking at the whole story!.

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Yes, you are right (again ! :mad::lol:)

I just looked at one picture instead of looking at the whole story!.

Don't worry, you can catch me "left" one of these days. But I avoid that by not posting as much. The more u talk the more mistakes you make. :whistle:

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Anyone know how the action is on the plugs with the cupped lips? Only thing I have seen similar to that are some of hazmail's plugs.

-Those "cupped lips" are called "saddle lips" in Finland too. Those lures, behind the link, have -I guess- more side-to-side action than wiggling because the lure bodies looks skinny.

Fatter blanks have more wiggling and if you put lip more down and it makes that wiggling action too because it makes more water resistance.

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Hey Jio, Diemai,Swede etc - what do they use for topcoat over there, is it Propionate, or epoxy, or some other mysterious brew? pete

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@ hazmail

I can only refer to what I am reading on some sites and what I know from friends , and it seems to me , that there are differences from country to country :huh::????

As far , as I see it , in Germany epoxy seems to be hot as a topcoat , whereas the Dutch and Swedish builders(obviously) go for Etex .

In Finland clear concrete laquer seems to be popular , and the tinkerers over there also thoroughly seal and reinforce their(most likely balsa) minnow crankbaits with dips of strong solvent and dissolved plastic in it(sorry , don't know the exact name) .

They also dip their lures many a times to achieve sufficient strength and thickness of layers .

Don't hear much about other countries over here in Europe , but undoubtely there would be some passionate lurebuilders around there as well , only I haven't heard about the local scenes yet .

Haven't even found a British luremaking site yet and tried to google for some French sites before , but my knowledge of the French language that I picked up in school about 30 years ago won't take me that very far:huh::( !

I may be wrong about my statements above , so I surely would also like to read some posts from fellow European builders in here.........c'mon , make us smarter:):lol:!

@ u63405

Happy to hear that you could benefit from that video......... this is , what sites like TU are all about !

greetz:yay: , diemai

Edited by diemai
text addition

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Hey Jio, Diemai,Swede etc - what do they use for topcoat over there, is it Propionate, or epoxy, or some other mysterious brew?

As Diemai wrote people use here very much clear, one component concrete lacque called LV 1 (Solmaster mainpage).

Other popular is propionate-based lacque called "nitro", which comes dry very fast and make hard cover, but I haven't tested it ever.

All other are self made propionate lacque or CAB-lacque from "Lakkavalmiste" (CAB Coating System - LV COATINGS).

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Small addition of a Dutch builder :)

Just like Diemai and Jio say, in Finland the one component (floor) lacquers are popular. In Sweden and Norway etex is used a lot.

In Holland etex is the fashion but there are also builders who use one component pu clearcoats.

I use different types of clearcoats. On crankbait repaints I use the 1 component pu. Just dipping in the baits 6-8 times leaves a nice hard and glossy coat. On my jerkbaits I use mainly etex.

However I recently found out that a 1:1 mix of etex and devcon 2t gives the best results I ever achieved B)

Yes, they mix up well together.

Devcon alone gives me headaches because I can't get it to level out nicely and besides that I hate it to start mixing over and over again for just one single bait. Etex has the wellknown disadvantage of the long curing time and if you don't have a luredryer you're losing quite some dripping off.

Now the two combined gives you the oppertunity to mix a coat for more baits, decent setting time, rockhard and nicely leveled glossy result.

I guess a lot of our clearcoat choices have to do with the availabillity and the bucks. I can get etex and Devcon in the Neths but the prices, especially for Devcon, are outrageous.

If I read what the Americans pay for their Devcon I'm going :pissed:

I'm still looking for cheaper alternatives.

If some fellow member can get me some Devcon for a decent price.........

Grtz Paul

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@ Boskabouter

Yes , Paul , you're right , I also think , that the "national preferences" of lurebuilders concerning topcoat laquers also have to do quite a bit with local availabilities , and off course with the pricing as well .

I spend about currently 25€ to 30€ per year for my epoxy and 2K topcoat , would have been approx. 1 1/2 years , but the shelf life of the 2K isn't that long , always have to litter about one third of it , since I don't use it up , and order a new pack .

Greetz:yay: , Dieter

Edited by diemai

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Thanks Jio, Diemai, Paul, for your input, very interesting stuff, I maight have to do some 'Googling' and see what is available here, D2T costs about A$12.50 here (about 5 euros) and I am no too impressed with slabs of it falling off while away fishing, still have about 3 packs to get risd of though, and will probably be yellow by then. I dont know what they use here, because I don't know of any other lure builders, very secretive little community here.pete

Edited by hazmail
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That's an awesome pic tutorial the one pic I need explaining is the one with the weight tied to the belly of the bait while it is hanging

is that to find the centre of gravity for the ballist insert.

Thanks

Tim

Hi , folks , here is another nice one from Finland , not a video this time , though .

Came across it yesterday , it is a step-by-step picture sequence showing the construction of a fine , wooden swimbait .

The author/builder hit it very smart , there is no text involved requiring translation , and still the single working steps are clear to follow(OK , maybe not about the eyes , I don't quite understand that:huh::huh:) .

He really did a good job on this one:yes: !

KALAMIES.COM :: N

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@ dixiet

Seems to be , like you said !

I guess , that Finnish bulider meant to express that by this picture .

He not only hung the weight onto the lure , but also created a sort of pivot point above the lure , so I am very sure , that he determined about the center of gravity that way .

The whole arrangement is similar to those old fashioned scales .

And later in the picture sequence the weight is glued in at same location as where it hung before , anyway .

Like this he achieves the lure to sink in an accurate horizontal position , I suppose .

But I guess that it only works out this way on this particular model , since the front section of this bait is very long , you probably just can't balance ANY swimbait this way .

In a nutshell , most likely the weights on these sit in the first two to three sections , always becoming less per section from head towards tail .

But there are different threads about this topic in here , just do a search , maybe on "weighting swimbaits" , "swimbait ballast" or similar terms ,........ I am not a real expert about swimbaits to give you detailed info , sorry !

good luck , diemai:yay:

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The Kalomies.com site is really cool. The Toony Roach picture sequence is awesome.

Jed

Edited by RiverMan

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Wow!

That site is impressive!

I too wish the translation was better, I tried inter-tran and was worse! Just looking quickly I found workshops, wire-bending jigs and test tanks! It looks like someone cloned 500 Petes (Hazmail) and taught them to speak Finnish...

Some of the other stuff is impressive as well, Ice rods, knives, etc.

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