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Tally

weight for slow rise

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Would someone explain how you get the crank weighted to create a slow rise? I have been playing with this for some time now. When the bait sits right in the water it rises quickly. If I wait the bait for the slow rise the top barely sticks out of the water. :?
thanks- Tally

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I'm not sure what type of wood you're using, but I'm guessing balsa. Balsa is extremely buoyant. Have you tried using a different kind of wood that is less buoyant? That might help because you wouldn't need to add as much weight.

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When you add weight to a lure to get a slow rise it will change how high the lure sits in the water at rest.You are trying to make the lure neutrally bouyant or "weigh the same", by volume, as water.Keep in mind that a weighted lure will rise faster in 45 degree water(more dense) than in 80 degree water(less dense).That is one reason why there was a suspending lure produced a few years ago that was adjustable by adding or removing water in the lure cavity to suit the water temp.A weighted lure will always set lower in the water than the same lure unweighted.For a lure that truly suspends, that lure would sit in the water with very little or no body above the surface.The body shape and lip size do have some effect on how fast a lure rises when the retrieve is stopped.That is why one lure style/type may rise at the speed that you want and seem to set higher in the water and you could have another lure style/type that rises at the same speed and sits lower at rest.So basically, what you described is right and unavoidable if you are going for a slow rise or a suspending effect.

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I would say to experiment in the temp of water you are fishing w/ all the hardware on the lure...add more weight, whether it be wrapping wire around a hook, using a sticky weight system, or drilling a hole and filling w/ weight. Generally speaking though, the more weight you add, the less lively the action of the bait, generally speaking...

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What wood comes close to be neutrally bouyant and not so hard that you can't work with it? Cedar/balsa combo rises like it was taking off to the moon.
Tally-

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:D Hi Tally, well when it comes to wood, its kinda like everything else. Its whats the easiest for you to get or maybe what you first tried. I tried cedar with mixed feelings. I did some basswood, easy to work with but in my opinion too light for a small crankbait. I ended up trying maple as it is fine grained, strong, don't split real easy and don't take alot to weight compared to balsa or cedar. Just my opinion, give it a try and let me know what you think. Good luck Ken Schmitz Mylures

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Tally,
I have had real good luck using poplar when trying to get a bait to suspend. Does not take much weight. Skeeter put me on to this. Also Basswood has worked for me. Again it does not take as much weight as balsa. A lot was trial and error and I kept notes on how much wieght I put in and how the plug worked.

Charlie M
AKA boyhowdy

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Thanks to all who replied. Sounds Like old DT is going to have to play the mad scientist and experiment a while.
Again, thanks
Tally

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