Milia B

I bow down to you all!

47 posts in this topic

After 4 hours of work and 3 blades working with a scroll saw I have roughed out a crawfish shaped blank. How the heck do you guys do this ! It's way harder than it looks! At this rate I'll have my first lure complete by Christmas. Christmas of 2012 that is ! Don't worry, I'm not giving up. It's going to take more than a little chunk of wood to beat me. Although a few words of encouragement from fellow T.U. members would be greatly apreiciated.:worship:

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Milia, it has a lot to do with what you are used to, should see me on a sewing machine. Keep at it, you just have to train your hands.pete

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It sounds like it is not set up properly. I broke a couple of blades on my bandsaw when I got it, dur to incorrect setup. Read through the instructions to make sure. I broke my rule and started using the bandsaw straight away, without reading first. I was in a big hurry.

The craw thing sounds like a difficult one to start off with. Are you using an existing lure as a guide, or just winging it. Some progress pics would be useful, if you are prepared to allow the members to guide you on your first attempt. Might save you some grief.

Dave

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Milia,

While the encouragement from others helps, it's when you run into a problem you just cannot figure out on your own where the membership rises to the occasion.:yay:

Pete,

Watch the sewing machine cracks... Every guy should know how to tailor their own trousers. :rolleyes:

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keep going. my neighbor loves me. i heat there house with wooden screw-ups. its a learning curve,

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Milia, I started out with a scroll saw. Didn't take me but about 3 or 4 days to switch to a band saw. When it is set up correctly a band saw is definitely the way to go. The wood does not jump up and down, the cut is smoother, and the job is much easier. If you have one try that. If not perhaps you have someone near you that has one you can use. Think this will make your work easier and much more enjoyable. It even makes balsa work easier.

Spike, "taylor your own trousers"? Us good ole, redneck boys here in Kaintucky wear blue jeans, or bib coveralls. What's trousers? :P

David

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It is not difficult Milia, it just seems so when you first start. I had zero building skills when I started this hobby and can remember thinking the same you you are..........this is impossible!

Keep at it and come back with any questions. Soon you will be able to make a lure blank in three minutes flat.............

Jed V.

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Milia,

Don't think you have to use a power tool all the time.

Especially with balsa, a sharp carving knife is a very good tool for both rough and finish.

As for bandsaws, I use one, and, like David said, it's far superior to a scroll saw.

But it's easy to forget that the blade can cut off fingers really well. It doesn't look like a blade at all when it's running, just a smooth metal band. But there are lots of carpenters and butchers who have had their fingers evened up by bandsaws.

Be careful and go slow, and it will be fine. Just make sure your hands are either at the sides of the blade, or behind it, never in front, and it's safe.

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Milia,

I also started out with a scroll saw and progressed to a band saw. A scroll saw can give you great practice but there is nothing like a band saw. The band saw I use is junk and problematic, but it is still much better than the scroll saw!

If you started out and had no problems, you would think that this is too easy. I'm new to lure building myself and I have tons of things go wrong. I was routering some lures this week and two of them cracked because I clamped them too tight. Now I just have shorter lures! You will learn the most from your failures, not successes.:yes: As long as you have problems, you are learning.

jeremy

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You'll quickly get the hang of it, don't worry! I tighten the blade on my scroll saw with pliers to make it as taut as possible and keep it from wandering. When I first started, I figured a very thin small blade would help me control the cut. Wrong. A standard 1/4" blade maintains its direction better and is less apt to snap or wander. It also makes cutting a good lip slot easier. 1 blade width is perfect for 1/32" circuit board lips; 2 blade widths for 1/16" Lexan. Just take it slow and easy. The fastest blade speed will not always cut the fastest. The saw blade has to clear the wood dust it generates out of the slot before it can move forward, and the motor speed that does that best depends on blade type, the pressure you apply, the thickness of the wood and the wood type. A little experimentation can make it an easier process.

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Sounds to me you have the wrong blade for the job you are doing. Go to the hardware storelowes whatever and ask the salesman to help you with the blade selection. take your piece of wood with the lure drawn on and show him what you need done, he or she will select the proper blade for you. Having the wrong blade is like digging a ditch with a spoon you can do it but its a lot easier with a shovel.:yeah:

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So far i got this figured out ...i was using too fine a blade 15 teeth per inch and too high a speed ...I switched to a coarser blade 8 TPI and slowed the scroll saw way down ...I was running it full bore before and am getting better results ...the band saw thingy just scares me too much ... I get chills just thinking about losing a finger .....eeewwww !:eek: the last thing i got figured is the hand carving after the roughing out is alot of fun, I feel like Elly Mae Clampett whittling out by the ol` cement pond !:yes: Thanks everyone for the suggestions I really apreciate them ...I will start taking pictures so i can post my progress ...

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Hi Milia,

Glad to hear you got the scroll saw issue sorted out. As mentioned by the others, you will find that band saws are very handy if you are planning on doing any larger quantities of baits. They are also handy to have around when renovating or for odd jobs around the house. I suggest buying one that has roller guides for the blades as they can be adjusted to track better, run cooler and increase blade life over model with guide blocks.

I bought a RIGID brand band saw and then bought a roller guide kit from Carter to fit it. Also buy a high quality blade as most blades that ship with any machine are budget level.

It's funny that once you get into making your own lures you suddenly become an expert in so many other things like hydrodynamics and it's effect on different swimbaits shapes, how to make paint stick to every surface imaginable, pull strengths of different woods and on and on! lol

Then there's the whole issue of trying to be original yet still borrow from others and how to market yourself in a vast sea of competition etc.

Welcome to your new obsession! ;)

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If you still find yourself pinching the blade or if you have a hard time making turns make a relief cut.

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Pete, thanks but I know your just being nice. The guys here have said that a bandsaws the way to go,but I don't know. It scares me a little, I'd like to be known as Milia...not 3 Fingers Brown ! You say " Down there you gotta think outside the box" .....Well I'm telling you "make sure the box is fire proof and get inside of it !" Milia

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@ Milia B

So many advice about scroll saws and bandsaws has been given here , but did you even fix your piece of wood , when you were cutting it with the scroll saw or you tried it "free-handed" :??

I use such a saw as well , cutting my lurebodies from abachewood boards(softer wood) 1" x 3 1/2" , I always fix these boards on my workbench with 2-3 carpenters clamps , leaving the end to be cut a bit potruding over the bench's edge .

I agree , that these saws can give you bit of a headache and are not as accurate as a bandsaw , but I got used to it .

Sanding down the inaccurate cuts down to the marked abachewood blank outlines is a breeze on a 5" dia and 40 grit sanding disc .

Working with a bandsaw is not as dangerous as you may think , if you take care a bit .

A good saw must have an adjustable blade protection , so only the part of the blade is freely accessible , that is needed to fit the height of your workpiece .

There are also devices to hold your workpiece whilst cutting , so your fingers can't really get close to the blade .

At least you may use a piece of scrabwood pushing the workpiece against the blade , if your fingers should still get too close .

Always highly concentrate on what you are doing , wear eye protection , and you'll stay healthy ;):yes:.

greetz:yay: , diemai

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Nothing wrong with having a very healthy respect for the machine. It is only when you lose this respect, that the machine becomes dangerous.

I was worried that when the blade snapped, that it would be dangerous, but was pleasantly surprised that the blade remained constrained by the machine.

I feel comfortable with the bandsaw and ponder how I ever managed without one. Of course, you cannot do the tight turns as with a scroll saw, but this has not presented any problems so far. I use a belt sander to tidy up after the saw operation or a dremel for the tight internal radii.

Like someone suggested earlier in this thread, it would be a good idea to try one first, to see if it does what you want. Must be someone close to your location with a bandsaw. I think there is a place in the workshop for both machines.

Dave

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You know what - I just realised, I don't have either a band saw, or scroll saw, no wonder I am so slow - I have everything else though, (except a lathe) and, and .pete

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OK, here's where I'm at. I have carved from my cut blank a crawfish, backwards swimming fish or polly wog shaped lure depending on how you look at it. I think it looks pretty good and symetrical. I decided to do a "float test" in the sink. The results were disapointing to say the least. It floated pretty much on one side . Is this because the lure is unsymetrical or maybe because of uneven density in the wood I used. Will this be fixed when I add hardware and internal weight ? I don't know what wood I used. Woodcrafters had no Basswood so I just got a grab bag of exotic woods. It's creamy yellow with real fine graphite colored grain. HELP ME MR. WIZZARD !

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The addition of a ballast weight located in the lower section of the bait will most likely correct your problem.

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@ Milia B

Most likely lureblanks won't float up in a proper position , that's normal , since there is no hardware attached nor balance weights placed .

Different densities of wood within the blank should not matter , unless on spindle shaped , small unweighted lures .

These you can test by letting them roll on a plane , even surface , or even in water !

They'd roll out with the heavier portion at bottom , so this would be their belly side .

I won't put an unprotected blank in water to test , since water would enter and it may take up to a few days time(depending on how long it's exposed to water)to dry thoroughly.

Also it causes the wood grain to rise up , thus some more sanding required .

I test my lures the first time with lips and and hardware temporary attached and topcoated with 2 layers of acrylic clear paint .

Then I also can determine about amount and location of balance weights(I stick them on with plastic cable insulation tape) , after this I disassemble the hardware again , embed the weights at proper location , buff the temporary topcoat , prime , paint and finally topcoat .

good luck :yay:, diemai

Edited by diemai

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Thanks a ton ! I'm not too worried about it being in the water for a few seconds, This lure ( my first ) is deffinetly on the slow track to completion. It does look suprisingly like the planed shape I drew up. I'll let it sit for a day to make sure it's dry and give it a go with the sand paper. Thanks for the advise again it's allways welcome. Milia

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