strictly esox

Florescent paint help

15 posts in this topic

I sprayed a couple firetiger baits tonight and I'm wondering if anyone is having the same problems with coverage as I am.

For starters I sprayed the baits flat white, then floro yellow, floro green, floro orange throat and belly, then black stripes.

I tried C-tex and neon Apple Barrels paints thinned with Windex. The c-tex wouldnt cover completly in the yellow or green no matter how many coats I applied, the AB did cover but took a ton of coats, I'm guessing 6 for yellow and maybe up to 9 for green. I know the paint wasnt to thin, I didnt even thin the c-tex and tried running the Ab so thick it wouldnt spray. Am I doing something wrong or is this just the nature of floro paint?:(

Thanks, John

Did I mention the cat jumped into my spray booth nocking my airbrush out of my hand which was just filled with floro green paint, after which I dropped my wet bait on the floor.:censored::pissed::censored:

A little yellow and orange and the wife will have a firetiger cat.:lol:

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change paints. we do one coat over base whites with our floro paints. if you have ventilation try one shot flourescents.

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Stupid question I know, but did you stir it up, because of the nature of the colours (transparent) the pigments are pretty weak to let light through? Maybe it does not like the windex, or was the base coat dry ? I use a bit of fluro, and lately have used rattle cans, one or two coats is usually plenty.Maybe use the same brand/brew base coat!!!!pete

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You could also try doing a coat of opaque paint of the same color first, and then the flourescent over it.

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Don't thin the c-tex, kick the psi up a little higher. You will still need to shoot several thin coats for complete coverage. Make sure you heat set each coat and if you try to spray 1 thick coat it will crack when you heat set it.

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Good advice Benton, and I thought at first that you hit the nail on the head, but then I noticed that he said he also shot them without thinning. I never thin Createx flourescents either, shoot them a lot, and have no problems, although it is the nature of that paint to require some extra spraying for really strong colors over flat white. I like shooting flourescents over pearl white myself, and I like being able to do a lighter but still consistant, flourescent shade. However Esox, in your case, assuming you're after some stronger color, shooting them over similar opaque colors would save you some painting.

Dean

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I'll try shooting the fluro over a similar color opaque this weekend, that sounds like it might work. If not it might create a cool new looking shade of color. Thanks for everyone's opinion, I will post my results.

John;)

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I finally got around to reshooting my bait. I sprayed it with c-tex opaque yellow first. I couldnt get the true fluro yellow to come out over the base yellow even after 6 coats. It doesnt look to bad, I am going to leave it the way it is. Next time I'll try a lighter yellow or go back to base white. I guess it's just the nature of the paint.

John:?

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I think so John. I've sprayed a lot of flourescent yellow, and I'm probably used to spraying much heavier coats than you are--I may be spraying in 2 coats what you're spraying in half a dozen. In doing so, I keep the brush moving and the bait turning, and I never get runs. I believe what we're talking about here is getting a feel for a type of paint in a particular color, so when I think of painting six coats of fl. yellow Createx, it strikes me as an extaordinary amount of paint and painting, because of the way I'm used to applying it.

Also, with fl. yellow over a white or pearl base, one can achieve more than one uniform shade, which is something I've learned to consciously choose. And unlike most colors, fl. yellow Createx simply requires a heavier touch, much heavier than darker or high contrast colors.

So yes, it is the nature of the paint, and it is also the nature of the painter, in terms of how we get used to painting different colors of a certain kind of paint.

And, it shows how something that can easily be expressed in a person-to-person two minute conversation with lures in hand, can often become a real head-scratcher on an internet forum!

Dean

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strickly esox, before you painted, did you clean the bait with alcohol? It must be free of any oils. Also, did you touch any of the paint with your fingers between coats? If you did, you will have tons of problems trying to get the fl. paints to work.

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strickly esox, before you painted, did you clean the bait with alcohol? It must be free of any oils. Also, did you touch any of the paint with your fingers between coats? If you did, you will have tons of problems trying to get the fl. paints to work.

Hey There Jim, also from Our Fished-to-death Commonwealth,

I don't think Esox is having adhesion problems, which would happening if he had oil-contaminated baits. After I'd given the matter some longer thought, I realized that he is just experiencing a typical characteristic for Createx Flourescent Yellow: That it takes a lot more fl. yellow to equal the same coverage you'd get from a light coat of any other Createx color.

Six coats of fl.yellow Createx sounded like he was having to use way too much paint to me, until I thought about how heavily I shoot flourescent yellow; I don't spray it in the thin coats I spray other colors.

Dean

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I layed it on thick enough that it took alot longer than normal to set up with my heat gun. I'll try a practice piece this weekend and lay it on even heavier and see what happens. :cry: I'm sure I could lay it on thicker and not get any runs.

I would like to get this figured out, firetiger is a real popular color for 1 of the local musky lakes around here and I get alot of requests for it. I put 26 Musky in the net and lost over 30 more on that lake this year, all but 1 was on firetiger and believe me I do try other colors.

One strange thing I've noticed with all my fluro's in 2 different brands is some of the paint that sticks to the lid of my gravity feed brush seems to turn into vinal when it's starting to set up. It peels of no problem but it seems strange, none of my other paints do this. I can assure you the paint is mixed up real well, I shake up all my paints until my wrist hurts. I'm going to check out a new local hobie store this weekend for some different paints. I was in there once and they had about 8 different brands of water based paints. They were way over priced but for just fluro's it might be worth a couple extra bucks.

John

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i have found that that flo yellow goes good over flat white primer and light coating then dry three times usually does the trick. My aztek is picky on thickness of the paint and i also have to thin. I use water with my acryllic createx. I use acryllic thinner with other paints. i stir with popsicle sticks in a baby jar to mix.

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