strictly esox

paint booth, do I need to exaust?

4 posts in this topic

I know this subject has been done to death but I'm going to ask anyway. I did a search and had some of my questions answered.

I have a booth, 48" wide, 36" tall, and 30" deep. I spray 100% water based paints no exceptions, I have a gas furnace and water heater within 15 feet of me, flamables are not an option. I've been spraying in it for a year and always wear a resporator so I didnt feel exhausting it was an issue. But my 5 year old son always wants to be in the workshop with Dad especially when I'm painting, I want him to be safe, I dont let him stand to close and make him wear a paper mask (nothing else will fit his small face) but i'm afraid it isnt enough.

Hears my plan, I'm looking for opinions if you think it's a good idea.

I have a twin window fan that has cleared a bathroom of drywall sanding dust in about 5 minutes. I want to cut a hole in the lower back of the booth level to the bottom and mount the fan to the back of the booth. I would mount 2 furnace style filters in front of the fan inside the booth. Most of my spray would be directed directly into the filters and I'm confidant the majority of the rest would also get sucked up. Will these filters pick up the paint or will it pass right through them into the fan blades then get dispursed around the shop making the problem worse than before? Venting outside is not an option, I have glassblock windows and brick exterior. Is all of this even necessary? It appears most overspray settles on the bottom of the booth rather quickly but i might be wrong.

Sorry to be so long winded:yawn:, just wanted to be clear of my situation.

Any opinions welcome, John

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ir-regardless what folks say. outside venting is best. you could try a fastco hot water heater motor. the outlet would only require a 2 inch hole and could be piped out. they move incredible amounts of air, and are very quiet

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I would agree with Woodie to vent outside. If you are spraying with out any fan or filter the set up you spoke of would still be better overall to me. I started with an Artograph booth and createx to learn with. The artograph had a pre filter and a type of charcoal filter designed to trap ovespray, it had the option to vent outside through two four inch dryer vents. I am a builder and in the old days when I was young we would forget a dryer vent every now and then. Getting a hole through brick is not as bad as you would think. If you measure over from your glass block on the inside to make sure you do not hit a floor joist or blocking, then go out side and transfer that measurement to the closest vertical head joint on the brick . Move the vent tube around to catch the most joints you can then trace the pipe on the brick. Take a masonary bit and drill some holes around the line and break out the rest with a masonary chisel. for the wood bond you drill a hole to get a sawzall blade in and cut the wood out. install the vent, caulk it, and put your insulation back on the inside. You can also rent a core drill at depot that will do a perfect large enough hole very reasonably. Plumbers go through ten inch poured walls for septics like this the brick will be way easier. Water based paints still have plenty of chemicals in them you should not inhale. I would not spray anything solvent based in the house even if vented.

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After a long discusion with my wife about shooting a 2" hole through a brick wall I decided a 20" 5 speed fan would be the best choice for filtering over spray. My boss gave me some filters from our spray booth at work. It seems to work really well, I sprayed an entire cup full of paint into the filter and nothing got through to the fan blades. It definatley picks up the overspray without a problem. Thanks for your input, I realize venting outside would obviously be the best option, but like I said it's not an option.

Thanks, John

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