.dsaavedra.

Got some real nice cedar

17 posts in this topic

i got a good sized piece of some really nice cedar just to try out (and theres plenty more where this came from).

i've heard of people using cedar in for baits, and i have a hard time finding good cedar like this, so i figured i'd get some.

cedar sure was hard to cut.

is cedar a very hard wood? dense? heavy? good for sinking baits? easy to work with?

help, i've never used cedar :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Personally cedar, specifically white cedar, is my favorite-both for it's action/durability and ease of working with. White cedar, if that's what you purchased, is historically the wood used by producers up to the 1940's so it's action is well documented as well as it's water resistance.

Red cedar is another story. Flakey, oily, unpredictable and untrustworthy. Just my opinion.

PM me if you want to discuss cedar in more detail.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Birdman - Please post the info so we all can see. I have some red cedar I was thinking of using too. Thanks, Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is a density chart, so that you can compare the different woods.

http://www.csudh.edu/oliver/chemdata/woods.htm

I've never used cedar, but what I have learned here on TU, is that the wood dust is a problem, so a mask should be used when working with power tools. But you should be wearing a mask anyway!

At 0.492gm/cm3 density, it should make a decent lure.

Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

cool page vodkaman

so the red cedar i have is .492g/cc compared to the basswood i regularly use, which is .398g/cc. that should mean this cedar will be easier to sink right?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

cedars very good for action. we use red cedar mainly. after tens of thousands of lures over the last 25 years its still the most economical and desired for its corky action. . sealed properly and cleared it holds paint very well also. its easy to work. remember a dust system is recomended.. lures are tools and certain woods are needed for different applications. as for red cedar being not recomended, check out how many manufatures actually use it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry for the delay. I tried to email from the restuarant but I was told to sit up straight, put down the phone and eat my salad.

Like I said, it's just my opinion based on personal experience. I too made all of my first baits with red cedar but continually experienced bubbling and crawling of the final coat. Came to find out it was the oils in the wood. The solution was to bleach the bait before sealing and painting. You'll find it varies from one piece to the another. In my case, rather than add one more step to the whole process, I opted for white cedar.

As far as the dust cedar produces, I have to say it never bothered me but then I lived with a giant brain tumor for 4 years and never noticed it (not really). If it bothers you as many have said, use a good mask/respirator.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

with the cedars one thing is to solve bubbling or problems, a good sanding sealer. we use that with 28 per-cent solids. a good dip in the tank it covers everything. a quick scuff where neededand prime. also with cedars we hand select our wood. yes there is flakey, but if you read the wood you can choose your quality.. same as sanding. some folks oversand and raise the grain. we sand to 150 grit. sealer and primer covers any smaller grit marks. hope this helps someone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I'm not mistaken there are two types of red cedar.

1. Red Aromatic cedar which is oily and has that traditional cedar closet smell.

2. Western Red cedar. I find it's properties are closer to that of white cedar. Not as oily.

Birdman I am wondering if you had some aeromatic cedar? I have just started making lure, but have been woodworking for years. I have never had a problem with western Red Cedar offgassing bubbles through a finish. Aeromatic cedar can though. I usually wipe it down really good with a denatured alchohol or other oil reducer (japan drier) to free iy of the top layers of oil first.

Just my experience.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is very possible. It's been a while since I used red cedar so by now it's been removed from the stock. But as you say, if precautions are taken, the problem is less likely to happen.

My very first 2-300 baits (topwaters) were all made with Red Cedar and I still hear from old customers that they were the best baits I ever made. I've seen a few-finish all gone, tooth marks up and down the sides. Who needs viagra with photos like those!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm new to making wooden lures, but a woodworker buddy of mine built me a golf ball rack from cedar about 10 years ago. He simply cut down cedar planks from the local home store and planed them to 3/8" x 2". Then he put a clear varnish over it. It has hung on the wall all these years loaded with golf balls with no warping or sagging at all. I'd consider that pretty stable.

The same type cedar is used to make strip canoes then covered with fiberglass cloth and holds up exceptionally well.

Gary

Edited by WannabeeFishing

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

birdman, is correct om seeing flaky cedar. if you can when purchasing lumber stock, check end grains. we are lucky locally. red cedar is quite available and good quality. theres even a re-saw company here that has re-claim old growth from telephone poles. some is excellent

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What a great idea-old telephone poles! Now there's a bait that will outlive a plastic bag in a landfill. Telephone poles are coated in creosote (trust me, I know because I grew up next to a creosote plant-we use to play in there!). You should make a bait, send it to the Federal Government and ask it be put in time capsule. How cool is that?

Seriously, I will try that. I have some contacts that can get a slice of pole. Please be careful sanding that wood. I think there were studies done on creosote to determine if it is a carcinogen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the old telephone poles were never treated. only the bottoms that were underground were tarred. decoy makers and some carvers search out the old cedar telophone poles.. . like i said im fortunate to have 2 re-saw shops within 30 miles of me. premium cedar is hard to get. red cedar from lumber yards is reasonable. ,, but you need to sort.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now