pigdestroyer

Powdercoat in the jig eye

19 posts in this topic

Anyone have a tip on how to keep the jig eye from filling with powdercoat? I am brand new to making jigs. My buddy turned me on to it over the weekend. He is green too.

Anyway, he uses powdercoat to color the jigs. Directions say to heat the jighead with a torch, then dip it into the powder, but the eye keeps filling in and I am sure you all know what a pain it is to remove this stuff once it hardens. We started poking the eye while the coating was still wet. This helped, but when we cooked/cured the jighead, the eyes filled back in. :pissed:

Airbrushing is not an option for us right now.

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sounds like you are dipping right into the jar and getting too much of a coat. you need to really fluff the paint up before you dip or build yourself a fluid bed. i recommend the fluid bed as you will get an even and light coat and not waste powder as well as not filling the eyes in.

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Over time your technique will improve. I agree with AK, a fluid bed would help you a lot. I depends on the size of the eye, but keep a spinnerbait frame handy when powder painting and run it through the eye before letting it set. Another thing is curing. Occasionally (like maybe 1 of 30) heads will fill the eye during curing (it is always the same colors that do it for me. When this happens, you have three choices: pitch the jig and not worry about it, use a dremel and open it up and use the jig yourself, or open it up and if it is extremely smooth, burr free and looks awesome, it becomes a viable jig for sale (only if it is 100%).

If you hang your jigs by the hook and you get nipples on them them when you cure them, you have too much paint on the jig. Some colors will fill eyes even with a very thin film (once again very small eye holes will often require a wire to be run through them before they set up). Another indication of too much paint is if you are making weedless jigs and the pull pin whole is completely filled with paint.

Tim

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Hey Pig D

Pull a search on powder painting and you will find several ways to keep the eyes clear ... and a lot of other stuff about Powder Painting ... Need to re read it every once in a while to jog the memory on what you have read before .... Really it is a big subject ... check it all out.

JSC

:)

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If you are dipping into a container shake it real well before using and this will fluff up the paint. I use a propane torch on low and heat my jig for a couple of seconds on each side and then dip it in the container quickly and tap it on the container to knock off excess.

The paint should be baked at 350 for 15 minutes to harden and stick properly. As far as the jig eyes I heat a small wire and it slides right through. Depending on the size of the jig will dictate on how long you heat it

Edited by fishcrazy

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I just started powder painting as well and agree 100% with what akriverrat said. If your dipping in the jar you have to either stir it up or shake it every couple jigs to keep the paint nice and loose. You also have to make sure you get the jig head hot enough. If you get too much powder on you can move it back over the torch after you dip it to kind of spread it out. If you have way too much powder on that will only help so much though.

The fluid be really helps a ton. I built one myself. Cadman on here has directions on how to do it. If you google tj's tackle, they sell them on their site as well. Tj's tackle also had videos demonstrating them.

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After I dip my jigs in the paint, I use a toothpick and stick it in the eyelet to remove the paint. Works great and I average 3-5 jigs per 100 that will fill back in when curing.

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What exactly do you mean by fluid bed?

sounds like you are dipping right into the jar and getting too much of a coat. you need to really fluff the paint up before you dip or build yourself a fluid bed. i recommend the fluid bed as you will get an even and light coat and not waste powder as well as not filling the eyes in.

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its basically a tube usually pvc with an air chamber underneith it where air is pumped into the bed. this fluffs the powder. there is a ton of info on this site and they are easy to make.

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Until you get your fluid bed, one thing I suggest is to hold the hook eye with hemostats, it blocks almost all of it.

You can also use a paint brush with fluffy bristles to "tap" your paint onto the hot jighead, that way you can control the amount you put on. Juyst do it over a box to catch the fly.

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One you have to use a fluid bed. It just gives a perfect coating. If you try and dip into the protec jars or any jar that is not being agitated you will get thick coatings and nipples and eyes covered.

Second go to columbia coatings and order their plugs:

http://www.columbiacoatings.com/Silicon_Plug_Cap_Kit_s/318.htm

I got some samples from shercon so I am not sure what sizes the kits are from columbia but it looks like they have plenty of different size and they will last for ever so its worth the price.

Heat your leadhead (use a heat gun I used a torch before and it is so hard to get the perfect temperature and the heat gun is constant) then us the plug to cover the eye and dip. works like a charm never have to clear eyes except when I forget to put the plug on lol.

I learned this from someone on the website here but can't remember who I would like to give them credit.

It is by far the best method I have come across. You can even put the plug on before you heat since they are heat resistant.

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Anyone have a tip on how to keep the jig eye from filling with powdercoat? I am brand new to making jigs. My buddy turned me on to it over the weekend. He is green too.

Anyway, he uses powdercoat to color the jigs. Directions say to heat the jighead with a torch, then dip it into the powder, but the eye keeps filling in and I am sure you all know what a pain it is to remove this stuff once it hardens. We started poking the eye while the coating was still wet. This helped, but when we cooked/cured the jighead, the eyes filled back in. :pissed:

Airbrushing is not an option for us right now.

You can salvage a jig with a fully closed eye (even after heat curing) by heating a straightened paper clip or other similar size wire to red hot and pushing it through the eye. Even though the powder coat is cured, a red hot wire will melt it. Eye will still be powder coated, but at least there will be a smooth hole for a line tie.

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If the powder is filling your jig hook eye when you dip, you're jig is too hot when you dip it.

This is what your jig should look like when it comes out of the powder.

DSC02084.jpg

A nice even coat with the eye open.

I heat my jigs in a toaster oven at 325*F before dipping, and dip directly into the jar. The paint doesn't really "flash" so cleaning the eye is very easy before I return the jig to the oven to flash and cure. I clean the whole eye (inside and out) for a very clean looking jig!

I've found that fluid beds are messy, a waste of paint, and really unneccessary.

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Anyone have a tip on how to keep the jig eye from filling with powdercoat? I am brand new to making jigs. My buddy turned me on to it over the weekend. He is green too.

Anyway, he uses powdercoat to color the jigs. Directions say to heat the jighead with a torch, then dip it into the powder, but the eye keeps filling in and I am sure you all know what a pain it is to remove this stuff once it hardens. We started poking the eye while the coating was still wet. This helped, but when we cooked/cured the jighead, the eyes filled back in. :pissed:

Airbrushing is not an option for us right now.

Here is what I do. Get some heat shrink with the inside diamiter small enough to fit over the eye and cut it to about a 1/4" long. I buy it a Lowes. It has 1/8" inside diamiter. Put it over the eye but not so far as to touch the head. You just want it to cover the eye. Heat your jig head and dip in the powder. Pull it off before you bake.

There are several peices in a bag and cut to a 1/4" it will do a lot of heads. I think it costs about 3.00. Well worth the money. It saves alot of time cleaning out the eyes.

Hope this helps.

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Again!... the hook eye is easily cleaned as soon as it's removed from the powder, clean the whole "eye" and not just the hole!!!

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I think GCD nailed it - I think it's simply you're getting the jighead too hot before you dip, and always dip in the powder with the eye up - don't make the eye the lowest point - shoved through to the bottom of yor dip. Some jig designs make this hard, but you can angle the jig or shift the powder in the container so it isn't on the bottom.

I had the same problems at first, but then I started using an inexpensive heat gun, and counting the exact time needed to heat the jighead (held by the hook bend by locking hemostats).

I found if I heated the jighead for only a second on each side for every 1/16th ounce, it was enough to get the powder to cover - looking exactly like that picture he posted. Then into the oven for curing - no closed eyes. For small batches or just testing colors or for personal use I just heat and dip, tap the excess off, then turn over the heat gun for another few seconds and I'm done.

Using this method I don't need a fluid bed or any other gadget. Your torch will probably heat a jig faster than my heat gun, so you may only need a second or two on each side for all but the biggest jigs.

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