KelpKritter

Hook Hanger Idea

11 posts in this topic

I got an order of stainless screw eyes to start using on my swimbaits last night, I had been using cotter pins and these are so much easier to work with. Anyways, I was laying out the hardware on the bait to maximize everything and had an idea for a different hook hanger. The fish will be the final judge if it will hold, but tell me what you think.

I headed out to the tackle store and picked up some SPRO Power Swivels in size 2 which are rated at 230lbs. I hang the hooks on my four piece baits at the rear of the first and third sections. So for this new idea I drilled hook hanger hole the same size as the swivel. I then lined up the swivel where the screw eye inserts into the bait and drilled pilot hole for the screw eye. I screwed in the eye to the point where it intersected the hole for the swivel hook hanger. I then inserted the swivel into the hole with the swivel eye facing in right direction so that when I screwed in the screw eye it would pass through the end of the swivel. Now the swivel is haning from the shank of the screw eye with approximately 1/2" of screw eye on either side of the swivel. There is nothing holding the swivel in place but the screw eye. It is snug in the hole I drilled for it and now the hooks rotate 360 degrees without any binding. Rated at 230lbs. I am pretty confident this will hold up nicely.

I hope you can follow the process, any thoughts that might increase the effectiveness of the idea.

DaveB.

KelpKritter

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Yes, It is a good idea. You are talking about the hinge screw eye, passing through the eye of the swivel. LaPala outlined a similar solution using thro' wire: http://www.tackleunderground.com/forum/hard-baits/8539-plug-thru-wire.html

If the hinge screw was not at a convenient height, the same method could still be used by drilling across the body and inserting a short length of 1/16" brass rod. But the whole idea was to save space, so ignore this paragraph!

My only concern would be sealing, with the loose swivel. Water would have access to the hinge screw eye. Filling the swivel hole with epoxy would fix this, but you would probably lose the swivel mobility, if that was important.

I guess a few drops of epoxy in the hole before final assembly would fix this problem also.

Dave

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Dave,

I failed to mention that the baits are made from PVC so I am not to worried about the water issue. Although you made me think that water might be a problem because the intended use of these baits is in the salt, therefore I should consider a way to seall off the area around the top of the swivel to avoid having salt water sit on the swivel for extended periods of time. I think I can do this without affecting the movement of the swivel.

DaveB.

KelpKritter

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Kelp,

The fact that you are playing around with the idea is good enough. I have been embeding the SPRO heavy swivels for a while now in my baits. The only words of caution that I have for you is "NO EYE SCREWS" this is the weakest point of any bait, and if you can get away from using screw eyes at all your baits will be all the better for your saltwater needs. The difference is I am pouring my baits and I believe you are using the JR Hopkins PVC method, which is a very effective method. Keep it up!!!!

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Billy,

Are you referring to the screw eyes being the weak link because of the salt water or general set-up in using them in the bait building process? The pin I am using is plenty strong and the screw eyes are embeded in epoxy and set in 1" on all sections and are stainless steel. I am cutting all of my baits out of solid stock. I believe John laminates his batis together along a centerline. I started with the idea of the swivel as I was rethinking some hardware placement when I saw your new clear bait with all of the glitter on bloodydecks. I figured a few things, took some measurements, and it came together. Swam the first bait today and it does exactly what the others before it did, even with the slight changes, so I am happy. Some of the baits are off to Catalina again next week for real tests to begin.

DaveB.

Kelpkritter

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i started pouring baits can i just put the swivels in my mold? will it get in the swivel and stop the movement?

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Ebby, it probably would, but worth trying one on a test run. If it does jam the swivel, try packing it withpetroleum jelly or a few drops of wax dripped over the swivel, then mold it. The wax can be burned off after molding with a heat gun later.

Dave

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Kind of off topic but have you guys got any suggestions on a hook hanger for a large-ish cedar topwater wake bait? It's intended for musky and pike and i'd usually use through wire but its going to be a little tough given the shape of the bait.

Sean

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@ Bassman82

Really depends on shape of lure and desired location of the hook,-and tow eyes , providing a picture of your lure would surely be of advantage !

If the lure's shape is a little "tricky" , you most likely won't get around using screw eyes ,..... if set in with epoxy , they hold up pretty well in medium dense to harder wood .

Twisted wire eyes are also said to hold well , but I do not have experience with these .

If the space given by the lure shape is sufficient , you might also install some "figure 8" eyes , set into bores leading from the outside to the inside and secured by some metal pins leading crosswise through the lure body and the inner eye of the "figure8" , off course all epoxied thoroughly .

Larger swivels could be used as well , I suppose .

Another way , that I have done before , is to make some cotter pins out of sst wire , lead them through bores passing through the entire body ,.....at the back I'd carve some grooves at the exit of the holes to bend the wire ends into these to gain a plane lure surface later without any wire sticking out .

This procedure goes at first like glueing in the eye and the shaft of the cotter pin , .......the hole at the eye side should be a little extented in dia. to create a "glue plug" , ....after thorough curing the eye is clamped in a vise and the top wire ends bent into the grooves at the back ,.....after filled up with epoxy and worked smooth to the body outline finally .

Well , just in brief , hope you can figure out a bit , if further info needed , pls. call back in !

good luck , diemai:yay:

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Thanks for the idea man. The way you describe it sounds like the same way they do hook hangers on the Thriller line of baits that Suick produces. Which incidentally is what I got my first muskie on this past weekend!! Was a 38 incher, nothing too huge but lots of fun!

Have picked up a couple more ideas for the hangers, will probably put a hole right through the back of the bait just below the intended water line and run a wire harness through it and seal it with epoxy. Should turn out ok i think.

Again thanks for the reply and suggestion.

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@ Bassman82

Congrats on your first muskie , always the one to remember through your entire lifetime;):yes: !

Happy if I could help a bit:yes: ,........greetz , diemai:yay:

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