Vodkaman

Double pin hinge

21 posts in this topic

That is pretty solid. Nice work. Do you think it would be possible to use barrel swivels? I am not sure what the pull strength of those are.

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@ Vodkaman

Very nice and interesting , Dave , thanks for posting :yes:!

Did you use any kind of jig to bend the wire connectors ,..... since the distance between the single eyes of at least each pair of them requires to be exactly alike ?

If I need to bend repeatative wire forms , I'd use a jig roughly consisting of a wooden board with some nails in it(heads snipped off) to bend the wire around .

Seen a similar hinge before in a Swedish crankbait making book(German edition) , but it was a single joint(not a pair of connectors) , instead of a wire form the author described the use of a sheet metal stripe to connect the two sections .

Thanks again:yes: , ....greetz :yay:, Dieter

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here is an other approach i used to use, i guess originaly from jrhopkins

hinge.th.jpg

scharnier1.th.jpg

the "pins" need to be "threaded" for a better bond. the edges (angel) must be sharp for a smooth movement of the sheet metal (otherwise it can get stuck). sheetmetal need holes or similar for better bond.

Edited by dramone

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V-Man, very nice indeed and a good idea. I like the holes. They really makes for a clean and professional looking job. I think I may give this one a try. Thanks for posting.

John

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Me too John, but I might come in from the side instead of vertical. Great work Dave, simple AND effective, I just wish I had that drawing programme you are using, AND those 'pro's and 'con's' are food for thought - any 'nit pickers' should take note here, all wheels used to be square.pete

Edited by hazmail

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Thanks for the comments guys.

Atrophius, barrel swivels would work. Just design the pin hole positions to achieve the required hinge gap. Also, because the swivel pitch is not adjustable, you will need to get the pin holes accurate.

I was not accurate enough with this first attempt and had to insert another pin in the pin jig, to produce a slightly shorter link.

Pete, not sure how comming in from the side would work.

Here

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Only one thing to pick about is a swimbait needs the front section to move the back section, double hinging somehow defeats this purpose as there is a "slip" of energy transfer in the movement of the front hinge before the energy transfer occurs. Food for thought?

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LP, interesting thought. My thought is that the water forces move the individual segments, rather than the segments just following the one in front, but I am not going to bet more than a ringgit or two.

Innitially, only the 4th segment was moving, but after some temporary re-modelling of the front section with some low density plasticine, which actually floats, I was able to get it to swim as desired.

Your idea can be tested out by locking one end of the link, thus converting it into a single pin hinge. But first I will have to repair the MK1 after the damage of the pull test. I will get back with the results, not sure when.

Dave

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Check this out: STRIKE PRO - Casting into the future

The Flex X Strike Pro's first multi joint swim bait, developed by president Michael Tsai and idea originated from Bicycle Chain. Flex X's multi sections are strongly jointed together by reinforced material and structure similar to the chain used on a bicycle; that gives the lure a lifelike swim action and the strength to catch the big fish.

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Very nice Dave, swims in the tub great, so should be good on the lake.

LaPala, they must be using watch or clock chain!!!!, I have seen these, similar to bike chain, but when I think about it, so is this link of Daves.pete

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Dave, Well done! That is a smooth and beautifully fluid swim. Congratulations.

John

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I dismantled a bicycle chain link to examine more possibilities. The pitch of the holes is exactly 1/2" and the hole diameter is 3.5mm (0.138"). The 3mm dia tube is a little sloppy, but no more than the twisted wire. Would be much tighter on a 1/8" dia tube. But, like the swivel idea, drilling accuracy would be very important.

The links have a rust proof coating, so should fare well in the water. They weigh in at 0.9 grams per plate and strength is beyond doubt. I see no conflict with any patents likely to have been issued regarding chain links, as this idea only uses the plate. I have not researched patents though.

Just another one for the hinge library.

Dave

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Dave,

That lure swims beautifully. Excellent job on the hinges. And nice music for the video.

If you don't mind, one thought. That's all I have left at this hour.

I find the repetitive back and forth of the wire against the pin is what wears out the pins, though, not the trashing of the fish after it's eaten the bait.

If I were you, I might think about using Captsully's bicycle spoke pins instead of hollow tubing. The brass will eventually wear, because it's softer than the sst wire, and it could collapse or deform under load. Once it's damaged in the joint, it looks like it would be a bear to change out.

But the bike spokes are solid, so they might be heavier and affect the ballast weighting.

I know, when I changed to spoke hinge pins, and the larger .092 screw eyes to accomodate the larger guage wire, it affected how I ballasted my swim baits.

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Mark I used the brass tubing in a bait. It seems to work great, the advantage to the tube is if it needs to be changed, a slightly larger diam drill bit drilled inside of the tube will remove it clean as a whistle. a compromise might be a stainless tube, but I don't think the brass will wear out to fast, but I will try it and see. :)

Tim

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Mark, a valid point. Question is, what is a reasonable life expectancy of a lure, in hours. 500hrs, 1000hrs, 5000hrs?

Next time I visit the electronics mall, I will pick up a solenoid and see if I can rig up some sort of life testing rig. I have been thinking about such a rig for a long time. Seven strand wire also needs testing.

Dave

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"I have been thinking about such a rig for a long time. Seven strand wire also needs testing."

Dave, so have I, use a fish tank aerator (240V @ a second hand shoppe) - if you pull it apart it has an electro magnet and an oscillating arm which operates the pump mechanism, slow it down with a dimmer. Save some time, a solenoid would be too slow. pete

Edited by hazmail

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Mark I used the brass tubing in a bait. It seems to work great, the advantage to the tube is if it needs to be changed, a slightly larger diam drill bit drilled inside of the tube will remove it clean as a whistle. a compromise might be a stainless tube, but I don't think the brass will wear out to fast, but I will try it and see. :)

Tim

Tim,

The reason I suggested the bicycle spokes is that it's solid sst wire, and of a decent thickness. It is easy to remove for maintenance, just by pushing it with a small punch until you can get some needle nose pliers on it, and then pulling it out.

But, Dave's right. If the wall is thick enough in the brass tubing it should last a looooong time. :yay:

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Dave, I've been waiting for a photo or some video on all that you discuss here on Tu, for quite a while. Well the time has come. The pics are great, but that swim video is out of this world. I myself, spend a lot of time, ballasting & shaping the lure body, so as to get a nice swim pattern. I must say, your swim bait has one of the best swimming actions I've ever seen, Thanks for sharing. :worship:

Tim

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