Sonny.Barile

Raised grain problem...

17 posts in this topic

I made a lure from some wood I had lying around. It was a length of old 2 by 6. I think it is pine or spruce and is prety grainy. I was able to shape out what I wanted relatively easy but the second I put paint on it it got some steps where the grain was prevalent. By the time I was done with it the grain really popped up good. Is there a way to stop this from happening? I have used #1 clear pine before but it didnt act like this........

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The wood has to be sealed with a thin sealer. Thinned epoxy, propionate, minwax to name a few. This coating soaks into the wood and makes the surface very hard. This actually raises the grain which can then be sanded off smooth. You may have to repeat this process, so experiment with it. A base coat over this and your paint job will be smooth and grain free.

Many think the seal coat is for sealing against water. This is a good additional attribute, but the main purpose is to remove the grain and achieve a glassy, blemish free finish.

Dave

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@ Sonny.Barile

I have read in a lure making book , that wiping the wood blank with a moistured cloth(water) would rise the grain and you can sand it over ,.........the book stated to repeat a few times , until no grain rises anymore .

After prime or first seal off your blank .

Make sure not to get the wood too wet ,..... in other words , let dry well between each process .

greetz , diemai:yay:

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This makes me think what would happen if you used a moistened blank to soak in prop. Since acetone is soluble in water, would it create greater penetration?

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Gentlemen

Thanks for the help. I will shape up a few more blanks today to try these methods. As I stated earlier I have used Pine before but it was #1 clear which I think is what is used for Pine furnature. This stuff I am trying to use now is just simple structural grade 2 x 6 I had lying around in the garge. It would be great to develope a working method as I have a few 5 foot lengths of it that would otherwise go to waste.

Regards

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@ atrophius

Can't tell what would happen really , never tried it ,........probably it might penetrate deeper since the water in the blank might still dilute the propionate :?????

I think , that I have read about that method , that I described in my previous post , in terms of making rifle stocks as well .

About 20 years ago I had assembled some replic kits of blackpowder percussion pistols and I think , that in the instructions there they wrote about this as well , ........after no more grain would rise up , the pistol stock would be done for the final oil treatment !

Greetz , diemai:yay:

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Sonny, I've never used any kind of wood that didn't require a sealer. There are lots of choices but I use either propionate pellets (aka prop) dissolved in acetone or Devcon 2 Ton epoxy diluted with acetone or lacquer thinner. You can dip the lure in prop multiple times and it builds up a nice smooth base that is good for painting. Epoxy/solvent is quick to brush on but you have to let it cure before lightly sanding and painting it. A good sealer also stops bubbles from forming in your paint if you use a hair dryer to flash dry acrylic latex paint (I do). Heating expands the air in the wood and if there is no sealer barrier, it will bubble the paint as you dry it. The bubbles pop up on the bait where the wood's end grain is exposed, often where the body taper toward the tail begins.

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A lot of people seal with just an epoxy right away but I get a way better finish by using a sanding sealer first. When I apply the sanding sealer it is absorbed into the wood and causes the grain to rise then I just sand the bait all over again and with the sealer it sounds down extra smooth. Then when I apply my epoxy sealer it is not absorbed unevenly into the wood and forms a super smooth painting surface.

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Shape your lure, add weight, then dip twice in sanding sealer. Next dip the lure in a white primer, let dry, paint, and clearcoat.

RM

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I think part of your problem is that const. grade lumber has a very wide grain pattern, since it's been developed to grow big fast, so the growth rings are widely spaced, and there is a lot of soft summer growth between the harder winter bands.

When you shape a softer wood like that, it's really hard not to remove more of the soft wood, which accentuates the grain pattern.

When I made lures from Douglas Fir, I used really old, tight grained wood that I salvaged from jobsites. Old growth timber has a much tighter grain pattern. Even then, the grain can still show through.

I sealed my wood lures with Minwax Wood Hardener, let them dry well, and resanded

with fine paper that's curved to follow the curves of the lure, to minimized the removal of the softer wood between the grain.

But having the grain telegraph through is inevitable. So I sprayed on a sandable primer, used 200 grit paper to even the surface out, and reprime.

That seemed to minimize the grain issue.

All this effort to get a smooth blank is another reason I switched to AZEK PVC decking (thank you JR).

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Hey guys,

i have a raised grain problem too when sealing my baits with Minwax Polycrylic. I normally do 1 coat and then sand the bait smooth and add a few more coats of the polycrylic. My question is, does it matter f you sand against the grain or with the grain after sealing?

Thanks

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Sanding cross grain will remove material faster. Sanding with the grain can have the tendency to follow the grain and accentuated the grain pattern.

I try to sand across the grain, with 180 grit, after the first seal coat. If the lure still isn't smooth, I drop down to 120 grit, again across the grain if I can.

The whole object of a sanding sealer is to lock the grain so it can be sanded smooth.

A smooth surface is what you're shooting for.

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I agree with mark, I actually put my blank in a vice, use a metal file that really rips wood off crossgrain,and use about a 10 in. strip of 100 grit to round it off against the grain. Then I just do some 150 to smooth out and dip for sealing. Then I can go finer if needed.

Edited by atrophius

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Well.....I got one done and it looks ok. Diemai.....I tried the wet cloth thing and it seemed to work ok. I did it once and let it dry for 24 hours. I then had to do it again but it wanst as much. I have since fished this lure in the salt for toothy critters (bluefish) and it caught it's share. The lure now has some small tooth marks in it which I think gives it character.........

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Sonny,

Try wiping your lure blank with rubbing alcohol. It will raise the grain the same as water but will evaporate much faster.

Gene

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@ Sonny.Barile

Glad to hear , that it obviously worked out for you !

@ Lincoya

That alcohol is a good idea , as it seems . I see much sense in it to be superior over water in terms of a faster process .

greetz , diemai:yay:

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