Green_Fingers

Crankbait bodies out of old CD/DVDs!

29 posts in this topic

Hi,

I though you hard lure guys might find the below link interesting, OK sorry it is in German but the photos are pretty self explanatory, thought it was a really neat way to get rid of old CD and DVDs!

Wobblerbau aus alten CD

Edited by Green_Fingers

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Enjoyed the article. Posts like that inspire new ideas. Thanks for posting.

Dave

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Just like with Beyonce, I'll never do it, but I'll keep going back to look at it, countless times out of pure appreciation. Very Nice!

Edited by Husky

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Simon- thanks for this excellent post, gives me a lot of ideas.

Diemai - do you know what type of glue he used to stick 'cd' to lure sides- is it heat set glue, the same as he is using to glue down profile etc??

Pete

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@ hazmail

If you mean bonding the finished two halves together , .....he states that he is using epoxy glue !

The woodboards making up for the master lure are bonded with dots of hot glue , on every corner and in center ,..... if glue was not too hot , they can be separated easily again after cutting out the shape .

The CD pieces are best heated over an infrared heater , a "hot air" dryer will do as well , takes one to two minutes on the authors infrared heater at 4" distance !

Turn over constantly for even heat up ,........if bubbling on the CD material occurs , you've gone too hot !

Hope , that I could answer your question , if more to come , feel free to post !

PS : If you mean bonding the finished master halves onto the hinged "pressing jig" , the author did not mention any specific glue type , he just states "glueing" .

But in the picture it appears , as if there is a hot glue gun shown ,........would be logical not to bond permanently , since that jig could be used with differently shaped masters after a little clean up , I suppose !

greetz , diemai:yay:

Edited by diemai
text addition

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Thanks Diemai, yes I was wondering how he bonded the plastic CD shells onto the wooden blank. Thanks.pete

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This brings up something I've wondered about and thought I would ask on here. I don't know if any of you have ever tried to break a cd but they are supprisingly tough. I was curious if anyone had ever tried to use any for crankbait lips. I work in the audio industry for my real job (my wife still thinks that is a hobby too, until I bring home the checks) and have been mad enough to try and break a cd. They will shatter though if you throw them against a wall or something. Don't ask me how I know this. However, you have to throw them pretty hard for them to break. It was just a thought I had when I saw this thread, I didn't mean to hijack this thread but it was along the same lines.

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@ hazmail

I don't find any working process , in which the CD material needs to be bonded anyhow to the master blank:huh::? !

Only time , these two parts are having contact , is when the heated CD piece is put into the pressing jig and bend into its final lure half shape !

@ danderson

I have read on local sites and also angling magazines about using CD's for crankbait lips ,.........some do ,.... but also some say , that the material was too vulnerable against breakage , when "mistreating" the lures(bridge posts, ...rocky embankments ,..etc. ) .

greetz , diemai:yay:

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@ sinyo

In his written explanation the author states , that one should heat up the CD until it becomes "visibly soft"(I translated the term , that he used) .

He does not mention any accurate temperature , but states , if the CD starts to evolve bubbles on its surface , it became TOO hot , ......so one should better start holding the CD a bit further away from the heat source not to get too hot too fast ,.......requires some experimenting , IMO !

He writes , that with his own heat source , an infrared heater , it would take 1 to 2 minutes to get the CD soft enough , holding it about 10 centimetres(4") above the heater .

It is essential to constantly turn the CD piece to heat it up evenly !

good luck , diemai:yay:

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Thanks for that Diemai, I see it all now, they are hollow - I thought he was laminating the plastic onto the wooden blank :sauced: , Thanks again. Pete

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Pete, I had a feeling that you weren't getting the idea. I wish I had PM'd you now. Sorry mate.

Dave

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Danderson, It is my understanding that CD's and DVD's are made from almost pure polycarbonate crystals. I too thought they would be very strong. I made several crank bills out of cd's and dvd's spent a lot of time on them cuttint shaping and scraping off the aluminum coating so they would be clear. first one I took to the lake lasted about three casts and it hung up in the rocks. while trying to pull it free, It came loose but the bill was shattered. same thing happened to the next one so I wouldn't waste my time on it if I were you.

John

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@diemai: thx i'll try it...

right now I still thinking about alternative heat source...anyone have idea???

from kitchen tool maybe??:whistle:

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According to Wikipedia (sometimes notoriously incorrect), CD's ARE layers of Polycarbonate, Metal, lacquer and ink. I suggest the reason it is not the tough stuff we are accustomed to, is probably the tension + resonance (on impact) between the welded/glued layers, and the burned grooves cause it to break????? hummmmmm interesting possibilities here!! So John,:yay: we are on the trail - Pete:?

Replicated CDs are mass-produced initially using a hydraulic press. Small granules of raw polycarbonate plastic are fed into the press while under heat. A screw forces the liquefied plastic into the mold cavity. The mold closes with a metal stamper in contact with the disc surface. The plastic is allowed to cool and harden. Once opened, the disc substrate is removed from the mold by a robotic arm, and a 15 mm diameter center hole (called a stacking ring) is removed. The cycle time, the time it takes to "stamp" one CD, is usually 2–3 seconds.

This method produces the clear plastic blank part of the disc. After a metallic reflecting layer (usually aluminum, but sometimes gold or other metals) is applied to the clear blank substrate, the disc goes under a UV light for curing and it is ready to go to press. To prepare to press a CD, a glass master is made, using a high-powered laser on a device similar to a CD writer. The glass master is a positive image of the desired CD surface (with the desired microscopic pits and lands). After testing, it is used to make a die by pressing it against a metal disc.

The die is a negative image of the glass master: several are typically made, depending on the number of pressing mills that are to be making the CD. The die then goes into a press and the physical image is imposed onto the blank CD, leaving a final positive image on the disc. A small amount of lacquer is then applied as a ring around the center of the disc, and fast spinning spreads it evenly over the surface. Edge protection lacquer is also applied before the disc is finished. The disc can then be printed and packed.

Manufactured CDs that are sold in stores are sealed via a process called "polywrapping" or shrink wrapping.

Diagram of CD layers.

A. A polycarbonate disc layer has the data encoded by using bumps.

B. A reflective layer reflects the laser back.

C. A lacquer layer is used to prevent oxidation

D. Artwork is screen printed on the top of the disc.

E. A laser beam reads the polycarbonate disc, is reflected back, and read by the player.

Edited by hazmail

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Sinyo- Hot cooking oil in a frying pan, Olive oil of course - thinking of your cholesterol level.pete

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Hi all,

Well finally got to go fishing over the long wekend, as spring his here, so didn't see all the replys to this thread until today, at least got something productive to do at work now!

Glad this post was of some interest to many of you.

I have to admit I have been pouring soft baits for several years now and never tried my hand at hard baits..... Well, fed up by the fumes and encouraged by nice weather, I carved my first crank bait from a broom handle this weekend and discovered that it is as addictive, if not more, than pouring soft baits!!!!...will posrt a pic when I get a chance.

Thanks guys, now I have a 2nd lure making hobby to eat up all my time and money:lol:

Cheers,

S

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