edgewood

Can it be to warm to dip DN?

9 posts in this topic

Got home today and decided to dip a few baits that I had finished last night and the finish came out with a "dimpled" appearance for lack of a better term. It was very warm today and it was hot in the garage so that is the only thing I can think of that would have caused it. Has anyone else had this happen? The DN appears very fluid in the container.

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I have had similar things happen with the propionate dip I use. I am almost wondering if I have it to thick and itis from sagging. I have never used DN really, but only thing I can think of.:twocents:

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I think what you are describing is 'orange peel' effect. Lots of reading on google for this.

My guess is the volatiles in the DN are boiling too fast and leaving dimples, due to the warmer temperature of the DN, if it has been sitting in a hot workshop all day.

Dave

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Thanks Dave, orange peel is what it is. I just went out this morning it's about 20degrees cooler and dipped a bait and it came out smooth as glass. Another DN lesson learned.

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I don't think you will get 'Orange peel' when dipping, only spraying - It is probably the heat, I have had it happen with oil based and Prop and D2T, it's the air expanding in the wood etc, and exiting through small pin holes in the paint - try spraying a clear sealer before dipping, let the sealer dry first of course.pete

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Pete is right orange peel is a result of the paint not flowing out due to several reasons: improper reduction/thinning, to high/low pressure or improper sprayingf technique.

You might look up fish-eye for the cause which in most cases is a contaminent on the surface or indroduced in the process.

Edited by KcDano

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The thicker coat you get when dipping is more sensitive to heat related odd curing phenomena, such as bubbles or incomplete curing next to the paint, than thinner sprayed or brushed coats: it's as though the outside cures too quickly, trapping or sealing some uncured product against the paint.

Orange peel as known by the commercial painting community, happens through spraying and is commonly cause by bad spraying technique more often than anything else, such as improper spraying distance, allowing the paint to begin drying before it hits the intended object.

Dean

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Well as it turns out I just needed to thin it some. I should of noticed how slowly it ran off the first dipped bait. I've done a dozen more baits and they came out perfect.

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