atrophius

Crankbait lip slot

41 posts in this topic

I have tried and tried to cut the lip slots true, but it is always a little off. I mostly use hand tools. Does anyone have any good ideas on how to make a good lip cut?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@ atrophius

I'd second to Bester , it's really the best way you could go , cutting your lipslot while the lureblank is still having a rectangular cross-section , only the sideview outline cut out already !

If you don't have a bandsaw accessible , you could utilize a 90

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, thanks. I will try those steps also. I think I am going to try and devise an angle jig some how that I can clamp in my vise. It seems no matter how slow I cut, I get off course in one plane or another.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A dremel type of tool would also work and not be as hard on the pocket book. You'd have to carefully follow your pencil line.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use a Stanley 15-809 mini hacksaw ($6) to cut my lip slots after the bait is shaped. I draw a line on one side of the bait and do my best. I use 2 sizes lexan lips 0.040" and 0.060". As it turns out the hacksaw blade (which I think is just a standard length hacksaw blade) is about 0.040" thick. So if I'm going to install a 0.040" lip I'll insert it after sawing then look head on into the lip to see how it looks. If it is slightly off angle I fold some sandpaper and can fine tune by sanding the slit. If I'm going to install a 0.060" lip I'll first stick in a 0.040" lip after sawing and see how it looks. Then I just widen the lip with sandpaper (and in the appropriate direction if it is slightly off which I will have noticed from looking at the 0.040" lip). Then I'll stick in the 0.060" when it just fits but is still tight. Then I can further fine tune by sanding the slot appropriately. Once my bait is finished I can further fine tune by dremeling the lip with a fine grinder like rapala used to do when they were made in Finland. I've also just recently starting using a grinding wheel on the dremel to cut lip slots and it is much faster but you must be careful and it takes a little practice to get good at. So you could get get some 0.040" Lexan (had to specialy order mine from a local hobby shop, but I've also seen in on ebay) and a saw blade that is approximately 0.040" thick and go from there.

Edited by pizza

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah, that sounds sort of like what I was doing. Except I think I will try the dremel thing to. Thanks for the info guys.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@ atrophius

Indeed a "Dremel" comes in very helpful for lure carving .

As for the lipslots its cutting wheels are well suited , but also try to obtain other cutting wheel brands , if they would fit onto the shaft ,..... since the original "Dremel" ones are a bit too thick for my taste .

You can also cut slots lengthwise the lureblanks to set in a thru-wire harness into it , the coarse sanding drums are perfect for rough rounding off body contoures ,..... it drills pilot holes for eye screws and you can utilize its various router bits for carving details like f. e. gillplates onto your lure , even shape cupped popper faces .

I even used it to make the cavities of lead casting molds out of aluminium , but that task takes it to its limits .

I really might not want to miss my "Dremel":nuhuh::nuhuh: !

good luck , diemai:yay:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

short board draw your line 2 c clamps to hold the board on the line , use a small saw you. dont need fancy to make lures . i know i still use hand tools ,an yes i got table saw an others learned from an old c. b thank you

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As for the lipslots its cutting wheels are well suited , but also try to obtain other cutting wheel brands , if they would fit onto the shaft ,..... since the original "Dremel" ones are a bit too thick for my taste .

I really might not want to miss my "Dremel":nuhuh::nuhuh: !

good luck , diemai:yay:

I just started using a dremel and they are great. The cutting wheels I use came from a harbor freight kit like this. They are about 0.040" thick. I plan to use some of the other accesories in it to shape a frog body next.

- Harbor Freight Tools - Quality Tools at the Lowest Prices

Edited by pizza

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@ pizza

Exactly what I refered to , ......0.040" is about 1,0 millimetre , the original cutting wheels from "Dremel" are at least 1,5 millimetres thick ,...... they do cut the wire harness slots for my 1,0 millimetre SSt wire way too wide !

Also found a tiny round saw blade on a fleamarket the other day , only need to make some kinda arbor to chuck it centered .

Good luck with your frog:yes: ........greetz , diemai:yay:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dieter,

I'd be really careful about putting an actual toothed saw blade wheel on a Dremel.

The abrasive discs are kind of forgiving, but a toothed blade will grab, kick, and run. It can do real damage to lures, but, more importantly, fingers. Be sure you have the lure body clamped, and both hands on the Dremel and braced, before you turn it on and start cutting.

I've worked with wood saws all my life (I have the stitches on my leg to prove it), and I would never use one of those blades in a Dremel.

The abrasive discs may be a little slower, and a little thicker, but they are a whole lot safer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@ mark poulson

If I think over it , I really see point in your warning , Mark:yes: !

No wonder , that "Dremel" does not sell such an arbor for their round saw blade , but only sells a hole accessories set for it , meant to use exclusively for a stationary multi tool , mounted rigid in a sort of a small drill press , I guess .

I've only thought over that option of a small saw blade , since it is always difficult for me to find those thin cutting wheels ,.... thought , that a saw blade would last longer , since my actual stock of wheels has gone down to maybe two left !

But I'll keep my hands off it now , as long as I still have them in shape:huh::eek::lol: !

Thanks a lot , Mark , .......greetz , Dieter:yay:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought the circular saw attachment for the dremel. It was unusable with the built in guard, so I removed it. But the thing is ferrocious, so it now resides in the box marked 'bad buys' and will never be used again.

When I used the dremel for cutting lip slots, I would start off with a 0.8mm abrasive cutting wheel, then open the slot with the 1.5 wheel. I would hold the lure in front of me, belly up, at such an angle that the cutter wheel appears as a horizontal line. This allows me to control the angle visually.

The abbrasive wheels are prone to shatter, so you MUST use eye protection, ABSOLUTELY ESSENTIAL. In fact, every time you use a gremel, you should be wearing eye protection. Go slowly, these cutters tend to snatch at the wood, not a big problem unless your finger is in the path of the cutter, so beware.

Dremels look deceptively harmless, but they can be brutal if not given the respect that they deserve.

After cutting a slot, insert a 6" steel rule. This magnifies any errors so you can adjust the slot with the cutter until square.

Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thanks for the warnings on the dremel tool guys. I've noticed the abrasive cutting wheels (which is what I use to cut lip slots) can also grab and melt lexan and plastic. I was messing around with an old poes and when I got to the wood/plastic interface where the lip is it grabbed. So be careful. Also be careful the deeper in you get with the cutting wheel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@ Vodkaman

Dave , what you mentioned about magnifying the lip slot angle error by inserting a ruler really works ,...... done this several times before on lathe-turned lure blanks , when I obviuosly could not cut the slot , when the stock was still rectangular :huh::yes:.

But instead of a ruler I had always used a bigger sheet piece of that particular Lexan or aluminium , from which I would cut the lip !

And thanks about your advice about eye protection ,..... did not bother to mention , since for me it has become most common working almost 30 years in the metal industry , just needless to say ,.............but others might not know:yes: !

greetz , Dieter:yay:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always use a fixture to cut my bill slots. If you are making flat baits get a piece of 1 x 4 or something of similar size depending on how big your bait is. It should be something fairly hard like yellow pine. Trace your patern on it along with a line showing where the bill slot is to be. First cut the line that would represent the bill to get the blade into the center of the 1 x 4, then cut the shape of the bait out. After you carve the bait, put it inside the fixture and eyeball it for square. It needs to fit snug, so either carve it a little big or make your fixture a little small. Use the saw kerf on the fixture as a saw guide to cut your bill slot. I have several of these for all my different baits, but instead of using the saw kerf for a handsaw guide, I use a miter guage on my bandsaw to do the work. For round body baits I make a fixture out of fiberglass resin. I put some tape on my saw table with some marks on it so I know where to stop every time. It takes a little practice, but you can make some very accurate cuts doing this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lots of great ideas! I have tried a lot of them. My band saw has been the most reliable for me; when the wood is still square. I don't worry too much if the cut is off somewhat because I use 1 or 2 shims if the bill is off line. I make the shims by flattening copper wire and snipping off what I need. my hands are not steady enough to use a dremel tool in this case.

Xacto has a backing saw blade like a tiny dovetail saw that does a good job.

ken

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was just wondering for you guys who turn baits on lathes. If you cut the lip slots before you turn do you have trouble with any of the wood chipping around the lip slot when you turn the bait down? I recently got a lathe up and running and the lip slot is my only problem. I have only made flat sided baits before.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I were turning a lure with the slot already cut, I'd turn that part with a wood rasp and fine file, or coarse and fine sandpaper.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@ danderson

The way that i cut the slot for the lips on lures that i have turned on the lathe is that i mark the spot where i want it and then just cut it.... but this is done when the lure gets off the lathe so it does not matter how the slot is, just as long as it is at the rite angle. Another way i bet you could get the lip slot square and what not is to have not all the piece of wood round. What i mean by this is that when you turn your lure you have the wood still square on the ends. So when you go to cut your lip slot the wood is flat on the sides. lol sorry if i didnt make any sense just now, i have never done that before and just thought of it while i was typing this up:huh::lol:.

Goodluck, Jacob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That sounds like a great idea as long as your lure is in the center of the two pieces and not off center. Like if I didn't get the block on the chuck centered. Otherwise I can't believe noone has ever said that. I had one of those "why didn't I think of that" moments. lol

Edited by danderson

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh ya! I didnt think about having the block off center:?. I bet Dieter has something like this before. I want to say i read somewhere on here something about this, but it didnt come to mind until i read this lol. Well ill try to figure out some stuff and if i find anything interesting ill post it.

Goodluck, Jacob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now