Lincoya

Proprionate Top Coat

6 posts in this topic

Anyone using proprionate as a top coat? If you are, are you sealing your paint with something else before dipping? And are you having any trouble with your prop blushing?

Gene

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Anyone using proprionate as a top coat? If you are, are you sealing your paint with something else before dipping? And are you having any trouble with your prop blushing?

Gene

Hey Gene,

I used it on my Urethane Resin lures and it popped like a peanut shell. JMHO, but it work well as a sealer of wool, but that's it. Anything else is a tempter of faith..

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I have tried this as a top coat as well. There is no guarantee for a clear finish. The factories that use it for top coats must have a pretty good "environment" room. If it is to humid it dries cloudy, and if it is not the right consistency, it will dimple from uneven drying. I suppose you can try it depending on where you live and use the idea someone else said on here, about letting it dry in a separate container with small holes in the top. That lets the acetone evaporate slower. I could not get it to work though, too humid in Kentucky for me.

Like Husky said though, it makes a good sealer that you don't have to wait days on to test it, and you can build up some layers under your paint for a smooth surface.

Edited by atrophius

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Anyone using proprionate as a top coat? If you are, are you sealing your paint with something else before dipping? And are you having any trouble with your prop blushing?

Gene

Hey there Gene,

Well like Husky said proportionate is best used for sealing wood, doesn't take long to do and you can get a really smooth finish and makes the rest of the lure look great!

If you want to use this stuff as a topcoat I would only use it for plastic lure bodies and not wood. The reason why I say this is because proportionate is not rock hard like other sealers such as D2T. So with the hard plastic the proportionate would not dent as easily... thats just my :twocents:.

And to solve the blushing problem you can put acetone in the bottom of a jar and let the lure dry in there after you got done dipping it. The way this is done is by making a lid that can hold your lure, alls i did was just poke to holes and the top and hung some wire down:teef:. What this does is that it lets the acetone dry slower, just like Atrophius said. Oh ya and another thing if your are using water based paints the proportionate will peel the paint off because of the acetone that you had to add to get the pellets to dissolve.

Goodluck, Jacob

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Gene,

The blushing problem starts with the higher humidity and the water condensation on the bait as it cools from the rapid evaporation of the acetone. The drop or two of acetone in the jar pushes the humid air out of the jar and just leaves acetone vapors that don't have any humidity in them. Hanging a bait in the jar to let it dry doesn't slow down the drying that much but there is no moisture to condense on the bait as it dries. You only need to do it on the final dip and you are done.

When I started topcoating with the propionate I had troubles with the paint running on the first few dips. Then I decided to spray the propionate through my airbrush and start the topcoat that way. Most of the acetone atomized and evaporated before it hit the bait and that helped me apply a few thin coats of propionate to the bait before I dipped it into all that acetone. The 2 or 3 sprayed on coats of propionate helped to protect the paint job. (It was easy to clean out of the airbrush with a shot or two of acetone.) Now I could dip the first coat with out any trouble as long as the first few dips were a quick in and out and let dry for 20 or 30 min. Then I could dip it as many times as I needed to to build it up.

A bait that is topcaoted with the propionate can be fished with after about 24 hrs. but I would say the full cure of the propionate takes about 2 to 3 weeks. If you do take it out fishing it will still cure just fine on the end of the rod or in your box because after about 24 hours 96%+ of the acetone is gone.

I came to the 96% # after weighing the bait just after the final dip, again 12 hrs later, again 24 hours later and then 2 weeks later. After 2 weeks the propionate becomes very hard (still flexible) and difficult to scratch.

I did all my testing over lacquer paints and paints that I made from propionate and pigments.

some people reported back that they are able to topcoat over waterbased paints as long as they heat set the paints and some had failure.

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Thanks everyone for your responses.

I'm already using as a sealer and I like the way that it works. I tried it on a lure painted with enamels as a top coat and it disolved some of the paint so, I was curious to see if anyone was having any success with it as a top coat.

Gene

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