ROWINGADUBAY

turning logs

8 posts in this topic

I just cut down a big red cedar in my backyard yesterday and I was wondering if this would be good for makeing lures and if it is can I turn the 2-4" inch branches on my lathe after or before it dries ?

Thanks

George

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Let it sit covered outside for 2-3 months then a month for every inch thickness. Then bring inside and acclimate to your shop for a month or so, cut and there's some nice lure wood.

You want less than 10% moisture. What you have there fresh cut is probably 60% and needs to be dried.

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Another thing to consider is that red cedar can have considerable oil in the wood. Prime it with a solvent based coating before you paint so the red oil will not migrate through your paint to the surface.

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Thanks to the tornado, we have a serious stack of pecan sitting out by the shop, and i've been wondering the same thing....would pecan be worth using for a crankbait?

I've also been thinking of planting some paulownia trees back in place of the pecans we lost....i've been reading about them and they are super fast growing and a great shade tree....the added benefit is the unique nature of the wood....almost as light as balsa but its a hardwood.....everytime a limb breaks off i'll have some crankbait wood....lol.

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I like paulownia because it's light but hard enough to use without thru-wire techniques. Downside, there can be a lot of variation in its density and it tends to have soft dark grain right beside very hard, dense white grain areas, which can be a problem to shape and sand by hand. But once you get used to its idiosyncracies, it makes nice buoyant crankbaits.

I tried to look up the nominal density of pecan, but it isn't in my table of material densities. It does make some killer furniture!

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hard but porous. Good luck turning it cuz based on that article it sounds like you'll be sharpening constantly.

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Seems the pecan isn't suited for carving....guess i'll just keep it for firewood and smoking meats....lol

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