bass48

devcon problem

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started using devcon a few months ago was out testing a few lures two of them hit a dock the finish cracked an chipped off any suggestions

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Did the paint peel off with the clear? Was this a repaint or a new bait, wood or plastic. Lots of variables here. The only time I've had D2t crack and come off was on some foiled baits that the glue failed after water got through the cracked finish. D2t is brittle and will crack, but if everything is prepped properly the clear usually stays on. I've been fishing with a cracked Mann's -1 for 2 years now and the clear hasn't come off.

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it was a new bait paint stayed also is plastic baits the epoxy kinda splintered like glass i use only lacquer paints

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I only use acrylic paint and I've never had the epoxy separate from it. I'm not sure about lacquer, there might be some one else here who knows better. The epoxy shouldn't shatter, it usually just cracks. Make sure you are using the right ratio of hardener to resin. Too much hardener and the epoxy will be too brittle.

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Devcon will shatter like glass if you hit rocks, docks, boat motors, or anything like that on the cast. I don't know of a clear coat that won't crack if you smash the bait into a rock. Just peel the rest off and refinish the bait.

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Devcon will shatter like glass if you hit rocks, docks, boat motors, or anything like that on the cast. I don't know of a clear coat that won't crack if you smash the bait into a rock. Just peel the rest off and refinish the bait.
Been there, done that....lol

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"just peel off the rest"

That sounds like it is easier said than done. Depending on how bad it is, where the spot is, and how particular you are on finishes, you could just fill in that spot w d2t.

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Well let me try to explain what happens when laquer is applied to it self. This is actually a melting process because of the solvent in the laquer. Thus each coat melts the following one to the last. When you let the laquer dry then apply the d2t there is no solvent to soften the surface and form a bond, Also the heat produced by the epoxy does no good for it at all. If you want it to stick real good you need a slow laquer thinner to soften the surface, then apply the d2t right after. We used to do this on cars in the 80's when urethane came out. Laquer's surface is also the finish thus not pourius and hard for anything that does not cantain solvent to adhere. The poeple that use water based or base coats on the other hand do have a very pourius surface for the finish to adhere to. As for epoxies that are not flexible ther are plenty out there if you want to look for them. Just to easy to get d2t.

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D2T is a glue. It's designed to be very rigid.

If you want a top coat epoxy that is more flexible, look at Decoupage epoxies, like Etex or Nu Lustre 55. They are designed to be able to expand and contract with the movement of the large woodens surfaces that they cover, like table and bar tops.

Also, rod building epoxies are designed to flex, hence the name Flexcoat.

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