jaycount

first 2 cranks worth showing, and tips to avoid making the mistakes i made

15 posts in this topic

DSCF0007.jpg

Ok, this guy I actually epoxied. White base, silver pearl all the way around, black stripes (used a pick comb as a stencil, I'll get back to that in a sec), white belly, retaped the top and redid silver on top, then blue spot at front of belly.

The picture makes it look alot better than it is :lol:. Pick comb worked good as a stencil except it didn't conform to the body of the crank so I had overspray behind the comb. Also, the lines didn't line up and I didn't really want the lines to run all the way to the top so I decided to tape off the sides and respray the top with silver. Unfortunately it took about 3-4 coats before I had the black completely covered up, this made for a sharp tape line once the tape was removed. In retrospect, I probably just shoulda turned down the psi and paint and got in close and shot it without tape, would've made a good gradient look. Oh well, I know for next time.

Epoxied it with Devcon 2 ton, that was an experience in its own. Stuff is supposed to be "workable" for 30 minutes, after about 10 minutes I noticed some spots on the top that weren't looking so great so I decided to add a little to help even it out. I probably shouldve just left it alone. Stuff was already really tacky (my 100+ degree garage doesnt help the matter any), so of course it didnt settle and now I have a bumpy and crummy looking top. ALSO, I stuck a toothpick in my front hook eyelet so keep it from filling with epoxy, just make sure to keep it moving around as you're turning the bait and pull it once the epoxy starts to firm up so it doesn't get stuck in there.

DSCF0008.jpg

Crummy pic, I know, but you can see the bumps I'm referring to.

DSCF0002.jpg

This guy got a base coat of white, then pearl green, then a pearl silver belly. Was just looking for an easy pattern. Haven't epoxied this guy yet, it's a good enough looking paintjob I want eyes on it before I epoxy it. You can't see it in this picture but the bait originally had shad spots on it and a manns logo near the tail end, I couldnt get these sanded completely off and it shows through the paint, but oh well.

So? Tips and suggestions appreciated. Next step is to get some unpainted baits and start actually trying to paint some patterns that make sense. :lol:

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Jay; Nice start! Trial by fire(?) With D2T you probably only have ~5 min. I screw up every time I try to apply epoxy coating to more than 1 bait at a time. I use "medicine cups" for mixing; they cost 2 cents apiece. Others are using Al foil.

ken

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Just try to not get too much into the hook hangers/pull to begin with and if you do you can heat it a bit with a hairdryer and blow it out with a simple puff most of the time. If you have excessive amounts after it dries just drill it out, just be careful on the line pull as any abrasion will of course compromise you line.

If you want to continue using D2T, try taking a stamping/crafts heat gun or blow dryer and heat the bait first before applying versus heating it afterwards to help level it. Just work quickly and efficiently and make sure everything you want and need is laid out before you mix up epoxy. Heat it, coat it and try to not overbrush the epoxy, and brush one direction primarily helps eliminate extra tiny air bubbles put it on the turner, do the next couple and then come back and just lightly hit them with a little heat if needed.

You can also go to Lowes/Home Depot or ??? get some acetone if you don't have it already and after mixing the D2T add enough drops of acetone to thin it by about 1/3 and mix the acetone in thoroughly. This will help it lay on thinner and will extend the working time for you. Or you can just switch to ETEX a much slower curing epoxy and be prepared to let in spin a long time and you will have to apply a 2nd / 3rd coat.

ps: l like Manns -1 baits, just repaint them and keep em!! Great for grass and thin/early lilly pads. I did a couple repaints as some of my early work as well and I definitely still throw them. file.php?n=2875&w=l

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If you have access to dentistry tools they work great for drilling out th epoxy.I get mine from a friend after they are sterilized.You can get burrs and drill bits.You can fit them in the end of an exacto handle and twist.The hair dryer definetaly works,heat bait before and during a little.I dropped a finished bait and totally thought I had screwed it up,but just took the hair dryer and slowly heated it all over several times and it looked great.Just not too much in one spot,rotate bait.

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I also thin D2T when I use it and put on 2 coats with about a day bw coatings. Probably thin it about 65:35 (D2T to epoxy/laquer thinner). By the time its fully mixed I believe it ends up being about a 72:28 mixture since the thinner is so volatile and evaporates during mixing. I almost always just coat one lure at a time and use the bottom of a pop can to mix/thin.

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Cool, thanks for the tips guys. I've got some baits and eyes on order so when they show up I'll give it another shot and post the results. :yay:

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small butane torches can also come in handy. They will thin the epoxy as it's curing and also help get rid of air bubbles. I run the flame about 1/2 inch from the bait and parallel to the bait. I also just learned the trick to blow on the epoxy to get rid of air bubbles. I've mostly been using envirotex lite lately but the D2T is good stuff for sure (wally world stopped carrying it around here).

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Now this sounds like a disaster waiting to happen. Did someone say to thin with laquer thinner and use a butane torch to level the d2t. If you do this I guess outside would be a good place and next to a fire extinguisher maybe. Alot of epoxys can be heated in this fashion but not when you thin with solvents. The beauty of most epoxys is the lack of solvents thus less shrinkage in the final product. There are products that are thin to start with and have a long working time. This give a beginner time to say take your time when applying the finish that makes your paint work shine. As for working times and epoxys the time that is on the label is almost always for about 65-70 deg. When you pass 85deg. the time multiplys fast to lessen work time. I know that there is alot of guys on this board that use d2t and It use to be easy to get but the work time is not very long. I know it does not have to turn for long if at all but it doesnt have time to flow either. Thus the wavy surface you have to deal with. I would try some thing that is more forgiving to start with so you can recoat to achieve the look you want. Ive been using epoxyies for many years and have talked to the guys whom manufacture it and if you have to alter the blend then there is another formula that is out there that you should use. I just hate to see posts like this because I know how much work you had to do just to fail at the finish. :twocents:

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good point. I've been using the torch on envirotex lite. What I really need to do is find a good brush to apply it rather than using a small screwdriver. That way it would be thinner to begin with. But it does help remove air bubbles and is fun to use. Sometimes I'll just take the torch to get it runny then remove a bunch from the bottom as it turns. Ultimately I end up with a thinner overall coat.

I've been to LB. My bros wife is from there.

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Yes as long as the people reading this do understand that you can use a torch on some finishes but if you thin with solvent it is not a good idea. Years ago I was talking with Ralph O'quinn from U40 when he told me about the formulation thing. He was also the one that hates brushes,say that they are for paint not epoxy. Got me to use a spatula way back then. Try this one use your finger with a glove of coarse to apply finish on a one piece lure. It actually starts out smoother and thinner than a brush. Brushes hold air then release when the finish is applyed. On good brushes this is lessof a problem but who uses good brushes on finish. Havent found a good way to apply with my finger on a multi piece cause of build up between pieces.

Hey Pizza,LB is a nice place to visit but im about done with the heat.

Edited by Frank

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The problem with heating epoxy is it accelerates cure time. That's something you don't need in the summertime, if ever. You can mix in a FEW drops of denatured alcohol, lacquer thinner or acetone to make a thinner mix and extend the brushing time if needed. IMO it's best just to mix it up and brush it on, then put it on a turner to cure. No solvent, no heat. The more stuff you do to it, the more likely you are to screw it up. Believe me, I've been there!

BTW, D2T is a glue. The 30 minutes referred to on the package is time it takes to form a decent glue bond, not how long you have to brush it on a bait. You have about 5 minutes, give or take. Don't waste time, but 5 mins is enough time to coat any bait, usually 2 baits if you are practiced.

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what kind of brushes do you guys use to brush your epoxy on(medium stiffness bristles?) ? I do agree that the fewer steps, the less chance of things going wrong :pissed:.

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what kind of brushes do you guys use to brush your epoxy on(medium stiffness bristles?) ? I do agree that the fewer steps, the less chance of things going wrong :pissed:.

I use the little 1" foam brush you get from wal-mart. It soaks up alittle e-pox but it lays down a smooth finish. D2T- 2 lures is all you have time for. Mix in the bottom of a coke can then throw the can and foam brush away. You can also clean around the hook hangers real good also.:wink:

Edited by JLester
misspelled word

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I use inexpensive square, flat artist brushes, the 1/4" wide mostly. Clean them vigorously with acetone or lacquer thinner on a cotton towel after use and they'll last a couple of years. IMO, the fine bristles in artist brushes make applying epoxy faster and more accurate, and they pop bubbles better so you get a better end product. I don't worry about air bubbles when mixing epoxy - in fact my Devcon looks entirely white because I mix it so hard (poorly mixed epoxy is the #1 reason for failure to cure!). All those bubbles disappear when brushed.

Keep enough epoxy on the brush that you're never dragging a dry brush over the surface of the bait. You want the sense of "laying on" a smooth coat from the head to the tail and you want every point on the surface to be "wetted out" or you will get voids and "fisheyes" when cured. I ignore epoxy in the line tie and hook hangers. Let it cure and drill it out with a micro drill bit chucked in a Dremel tool. I don't want to worry about anything but a nice complete coat when I have an epoxy brush in my hand and the clock is ticking.

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