.dsaavedra.

Lacquer as topcoat

9 posts in this topic

i use devcon 2 ton for epoxy, and every time my friend sees me working on topcoating lures withe the epoxy, he always asks why i don't just get a can of lacquer and dip my baits in that.

i told him how epoxy is kind of the "standard" in clearcoats among most casual lure builders like myself, and how there are other options like flex coat and dick nites, but he still says i should use lacquer.

he paints cars and stuff and he tells me lacquer is really strong and would make a good topcoat.

i don't know anything about lacquer so i really don't know if it would or would not be a good topcoat. so, would lacquer make a good topcoat, and if not, why not?

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Depends on how you judge a good topcoat. Lacquer holds up reasonably well. Dipping is far easier than brushing a clearcoat on.

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I have stuck with e-tex since it is all i know hehe. I know even back in feudal Japan, the samurai would lacquer their armor components before assembling them. i guess hundreds of years of use and the durability of a suit of armor might be worth giving it a try. I imagine a number of coats would be needed.

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@ DSV

As I started out making wooden lures , I also used a few layers of laquer as a topcoat on them .

It was the kinda stuff to obtain from toolmarts to paint over floorboards and wooden boats .

Later a friend introduced Etex to me and presently I ended up with epoxy , 2k auto cleargloss and just recently modelling dope , wich all of are more or less harder and more durable as the laquer used in the beginning .

greetz , diemai:yay:

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clear lacquers are hard but brittle. it will also be very aggressive on paint. old school baits were done this way. in todays age most builders use epoxies for toothy fish., . we used lacquers for topcoats for years.

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Lacquers are also very suseptable to "worm burns". In otherwords, the chemical that keeps the plastic worm soft will also soften the lacquer. I guess that's not a problem though as long as you don't get your lures and worms mixed together.

Gene

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so i shouldn't completely rule lacquer out as a topcoat?

can i put lacquer over regular spray paint ( i think its enamel ) or acrylic craft paints?

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I have been using clear lacquer for years on all my spinnerbaits and buzzbaits, mostly as a requirement from one of my larger customers. It produces a beautiful high gloss finish, but I have found that it is prone to chipping. There have been reports that it is also prone to yellowing, which I have found to be untrue. I get it from the local Sherwin-Williams store by the gallon. The beautiful part about it that I like is that it dries in minutes while producing a fantastic finish.

Hope this helps.

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@ DSV

I did not notice any discompability of such floorboard ,- or boat laquer with my modelmaking enamels or spraypaints , but some yellowing may occur after some seasons .

And as Lincoya said ,.,..... don't store laquer-painted lures together with plastics , only epoxy finishes hold up against the softeners containing in these .

good luck , diemai:yay:

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