allstate48

Need some painting help

13 posts in this topic

This is not a lure question, but just a paint question. I want to paint a board, and get it as smooth as possible. I've seen something on T.V. but don't remember what. My thinking is, to paint a coat, when sand, and keep this procedure going until I'm happy. I don't know what grit of paper to use. Just need some help. Thanks Doug

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How many people are on this board.. I would suggest if you want to paint them.. use.. water base paint.. I painted a school board once with emron paint and the very next fall they had to vote and get a brand new school board... I sure wouldnt sand the board..people general oppose to being sanded unless they have a sick mind like Capsully18... He might actually wear some pany hose and enjoy the whole process.....

OH YEAH!!! MY NAME IS THE ROOKIE and I stayed all night at THE DAISY DUKE INN last night!

PAINTNG IS FUN AND IF YOU DONT HAVE A SENSE OF HUMOR!!! YOUR NOT GOING TO LIKE ME! Some on here dont and tend to take this manual labor serious!

HERE IS WHAT I WOULD TELL YOU IF I WAS A MR. KNOW IT ALL!!!

SEAL YOUR WOOD WITH MINWAX SPAR URETHENE let dry for 24 hours

SAND WITH 150 GRIT PAPER

SEAL IT AGAIN WITH MINWAX

SAND IT AGAIN maybe higher grit like 220.. keep doing those steps and increasing your grit until your hands fall off.. then..

SEAL IT ONE MORE TIME and paint...that is how I would try it.. but like I said Im a rookie... and really dont have a clue if the advice Im giving you is correct.. I just wanted to have some fun cause lately TU has been VERY VERY BORING READING MATERIAL at night.. Maybe this will spice things up a bite.... more than likely someone with a TON OF EXPERIENCE will chim in with the correct information.. as for the board your about to paint... TELL'em TATER SAID HI!!! :tipsy:and

DONT PASS THE HEALTH CARE BILL:pissed:

THE UN-AMERICAN ASTRO TURF TOWN HALL PAINTER!!! :teef:

Edited by The_Rookie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I recently built a bedside table and wanted to eliminate the wood grain from showing through. I simply used a sanding sealer. It was like a very thick undercoat. It dried to a state that could be sanded in a few hours.

I sanded down using an orbital sander with 80 grit (just been to the den to check). 80 or 150 is fine, no point going lighter, as you are going to apply a couple of coats of paint anyway. Use the finer grits after the base coats.

After the sanding the sealer coat, you may have to re-apply in a few spots that you missed first time around.

It all seemed a waste of effort in the end, as I ended up with brush marks anyway, lol. But even these can be eliminated by using a spray gun, or if brushing, I believe retarders are available that will allow the brush marks to level. Modern paints are designed to be applied to a vertical wall without running. There lies the problem, the paint is prevented from self levelling, which would cause runs.

I am not an expert, this is just my recent experience.

Rookie, I am not famous for my sense of humor, but you keep TU interesting for me.

Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

sand the board with 150 paper, go to Home Depot ( or any paint store) and ask them for a product called 'Flotrol", it's an additive to use with latex paint that allows the paint to flow more evenly. i use a foam brush to apply it with excellant results. 3 coats, i lightly sand with 400 grit between coats and wipe off dust.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't know the effect you're after, but one of the epoxies used by bait builders - Envirotex Lite (commonly termed ETEX here on TU) - is designed to make a very smooth, durable, high gloss surface. It is in fact a pour-on table top epoxy suitable for bars, etc. It's sold in hobby shops like Michaels and Hobby Lobby for around $15 per 16 oz.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi I have painted piano's for a local dealer and we always use 2k auto motive primer/filler spray on 2 to 3 coats (heavy) allow to cure and sand with 400 dry and the surface will be flawless ,and ready for paint :yay:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've got everything smooth. When I'm done, I've got etex, and was wondering , what can I thin it with, and put on a couple coats, instead of one thick coat? Thanks people. Doug

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Etex contains solvent and is quite thin compared to many epoxies. But you can thin it further with most solvents after mixing. I use virgin lacquer thinner on epoxy (buy it at an auto supply store) because it has a moderate evaporation rate. That extends the working time and the curing time a little but Etex already takes a full 24 hrs before it gets really hard (in fact, most epoxies continue to cure for about a week after application). The key to getting a reliable hard epoxy finish is to measure it accurately and mix it VERY well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmm.... I typed etex in the search box and got 232 threads.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you are painting a flat board, and want a truly flat, smooth finish, use a rigid sanding block, like a piece of plywood, with the sand paper wrapped around it, instead of an electric sander, which has a soft, felt pad and will follow the contours of the wood, sculpting out the softer wood between the harder grain.

Use as many coats of a good sanding sealer as you need to get it smooth, sanding between each coat.

Then use a good primer, wet sand with 400 grit, and reprime, and then paint.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now