CheapTrix

Lure drier speed question

19 posts in this topic

I have a quick question, I use D2t as a top coat and have been using a variable speed drill with the button taped down to turn my baits. I want to build a drier and have the opportunity to get a small motor that turns at 1 revolution per minute. Is this too slow? I have heard of guys manually turning baits and I doubt they are doing it every minute. Any input is greatly appreciated.

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That may be too slow. Im sure someone else will get in on this. I use a 1/8 hp motor with a gear box that slows it down to 6 rpm.

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I used a motor out of a discarded microwave. It turns at 6 rpm's and seems to do ok. I've also heard of guys using rotisserie motors designed for BBQ grills. You could probably find those at Lowe's or Home Depot.

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I use a rotisserie motor from the WalMart Garden Dept. I had always heard that their rotisserie motors were 3 or 4 rpm, so I always assumed it was turning 3 or 4 rpm until I finally timed it a couple years ago and found it was exactly 1 rpm. As I use an epoxy seal coat for my balsa crankbaits, mostly E-tex, but sometimes Devcon, or other epoxies, it has led a long useful life turning sealer coats and clearcoats with no signs of heating up, or letting up.

Dean

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CT - In the past couple of years I have used 2 - 4 and 6 rpm 'Microwave' motors and I think the 6 was the best of these -

Recently I got hold of a motor off anti blood clotting machine, it does 16 rpm and produces the best finishes I have ever had - coincidently this is about the speed 'rod finishers' seem to use. I generally make 2" - 3" lures, so be aware if making larger lures (6" and up) tip speed may be a problem with these revs.pete

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I think 1 rpm will be OK if you only use D2T. For lower viscosity topcoats it would be worthwhile to look for something faster. I use a 4 rpm motor because it turns fast enough for just about any finish but slow enough that I can clip lures on it while it's running.

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Looks like I am getting varying responses on this. I guess I will just have to give it a try and see what happens. Thanks for the input, if there are more who have opinions/input on this, I would still love to hear it. I will let you know how it works when I actually get it and try it.

Cheaptrix

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I use D2T over my Rattle Can repaints and I have no dryer.I turn mine by hand,and like you said,probably 1 rpm.I watched my watch at first and did but now I watch the lures and just make sure it doesn't sag.If I get busy with another lure and it sags a little I put the hair dryer to it for a few secs.I do two to three at a time and it works pretty well,with that said I believe it should work...Rob

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I finally got the motor I mentioned and it was a 1.9 rpm motor, not a 1 rpm as I previously thought. Tried it out with D2T and it work great, I don't think much slower would work. Thanks for the input on this.

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CT - In the past couple of years I have used 2 - 4 and 6 rpm 'Microwave' motors and I think the 6 was the best of these -

Recently I got hold of a motor off anti blood clotting machine, it does 16 rpm and produces the best finishes I have ever had - coincidently this is about the speed 'rod finishers' seem to use. I generally make 2" - 3" lures, so be aware if making larger lures (6" and up) tip speed may be a problem with these revs.pete

Interesting comment Pete. Do you think it produces a better finish because the epoxy is not having a chance to move at all and is just staying put ??

Phil

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I finally got the motor I mentioned and it was a 1.9 rpm motor, not a 1 rpm as I previously thought. Tried it out with D2T and it work great, I don't think much slower would work. Thanks for the input on this.

Glad you got your turner going. Did you actually count the # of turns it makes in 60 seconds? just curious...

Mine makes exactly one revolution in exactly one minute, which makes is about half the speed of yours. After all these years, I am saddened to learn that I've been turning my Devcon and E-tex too slowly...I'll just take it as a learning opportunity:yay:

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No I didn't actually count the revolutions per minute. The tag on the motor says 1.9 rpm, so I took their word for it. I will have to do a timed count to see if that is accurate.

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Glad you got your turner going. Did you actually count the # of turns it makes in 60 seconds? just curious...

Mine makes exactly one revolution in exactly one minute, which makes is about half the speed of yours. After all these years, I am saddened to learn that I've been turning my Devcon and E-tex too slowly...I'll just take it as a learning opportunity:yay:

:oooh: Gosh Dean. You got me to thinking about my turner. Timed it and guess what? It turns 1 1/8 turns per minute. Guess that's because I bought my rotisserie motor from Lowes and avoided those cheapie ones at Wal-Mart. :teef::D

David

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FYI......OK, I counted revs and it is pretty close to the 1.9 rpms stated on the motor tag. Again, thanks for the comments on this.

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Hey Phil- sorry for the delay I have been away to the coast for a week fishing (actually nearly two) - I will PM you. pete

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:oooh: Gosh Dean. You got me to thinking about my turner. Timed it and guess what? It turns 1 1/8 turns per minute. Guess that's because I bought my rotisserie motor from Lowes and avoided those cheapie ones at Wal-Mart. :teef::D

David

Well there ya go, Kaptain Krash! You probably have it plugged into an extra hot outlet...or you've hot-rodded it and aren't sharing your speed tricks. Perhaps you've added the aero packages to your alligator clips, and swiss-cheesed your rotors resulting in a massive unsprung weight reduction. I hope you've safety-wired all your rotating parts, and even if you have, I'd still wear some OSHA approved protecive goggles when you're running that baby. You don't have it geared so high that it takes 2 hours to get up to that speed do you? With all of that top end, I hope it doesn't fall flat on its face when turning those big swimbait body parts! I'll bet you have to run an auxillary cooling fan on that motor, don't you, you old epoxy-slinger, you!

Had enough already? :D

Dean

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Hey Phil- sorry for the delay I have been away to the coast for a week fishing (actually nearly two) - I will PM you. pete

Pete, this has been on my mind for some time now: Do you lure builders below the equator have to turn your lures counterclockwise in order to keep your epoxy from drying lumpy?

:?

(Tater, please explain to IndianGuideNamedVinny about how the water spins counterclockwise when draining from a sink or tub in Australia. I know he was home-schooled.)

BTW all, I used to advise those building turners to get a 3 rpm rotisserie motor, because of the common knowledge on this board in those simpler times that common discount store rotisserie kit motors turned 3 rpm's. Mine was not marked, so I wrongly assumed that my turner speed was 3 rpm's, and it was discussed back in those horse and buggy days, whether 3 was fast enough.

Dean

Edited by Dean McClain
spellean

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Well there ya go, Kaptain Krash! You probably have it plugged into an extra hot outlet...or you've hot-rodded it and aren't sharing your speed tricks. Perhaps you've added the aero packages to your alligator clips, and swiss-cheesed your rotors resulting in a massive unsprung weight reduction. I hope you've safety-wired all your rotating parts, and even if you have, I'd still wear some OSHA approved protecive goggles when you're running that baby. You don't have it geared so high that it takes 2 hours to get up to that speed do you? With all of that top end, I hope it doesn't fall flat on its face when turning those big swimbait body parts! I'll bet you have to run an auxillary cooling fan on that motor, don't you, you old epoxy-slinger, you!

Had enough already? :D

Dean

OK, OK, uncle, uncle, Uncle Dean. :censored: now I know you are on to my tricks. Can't keep anything from you, you sly devil. The one thing you don't know about though, is that I installed a splash pan to catch all the DN slung off. I catch it and use again the next time. :D

David

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