ROWINGADUBAY

glide baits

18 posts in this topic

I would like to make some glide baits that have a walk the dog action but below the surface for musky fishing I found some info on where to put the wieghts for top water walking baits but have not found anything about where to put the wieghts for sub surface glide baits the lures will be six to ten inches long if that matters and these baits will be made from the pvc trim board since I get scraps from work for free!!:)

Thanks in advance

George

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@ paintsniffer

I am very fond of the old "Heddon Zara Spook" and also homemade versions of it .

These cigar-shaped baits have their weight located somewhere within the last quarter of the body length in the rear to provide the walk-the-dog swimming pattern on the surface . Thus they float up a little tail down(check picture of a homemade) .

The more to the rear the ballast is located , the sharper the sideward course would be , but the shorter the glide path .

The line tie on such baits is located a bit under the chin , so on a jerk the chin skims the surface , to provide some lift to the lure to keep it on top .

I also have a version of such stickbait made by "Berkley" , BUT that ones tow eye sits right at the tip of it's nose and thus it acts different , ........it most likely dives one to four inches below and(off course also ocassionally breaks the surface) does it's zig-zag course most likely submerged .

I don't know , how far you want your lure to go down , whether just a few inches or a few feet nor which body shape you're intending on , but over here there are a few glider models around , that float at rest and dive on retrieve , .......I guess , that it is all a matter of buoancy , line tie location and eventually the body shape .

You may check Lurebuilding 101 (english version available) , look for "Hybride Jerkbaits" , I guess , these are floaters , that dive on a pull .

good luck , diemai:yay:

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Edited by diemai

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I have found this foam to be problematic in that it is a bit too buoyant for these type lures,

( I only make 3"- 4" lures though), the big problem is stoking enough lead in to get the lure near neutral, you just run out of space - I would be looking a a more dense piece of wood, this way you use a lot less lead- Just my two bob's worth.pete

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If the board is very bouyant you'll need a lot of lead which is a pain as pete says,being from europe we use different woods than you guys in the states but for most of my gliders i use beech which doesn't need to much lead,i'd guess an equivalent wood would be maple or cherry,most gliders are weighted at either end about an inch in,you can weight it centrally with one weight but i find it a pain to get right to be honest.

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like bezy said a nice hardwood would be more suited, i tried one out of a piece of high density foam (trimboard) it was around 5" long and i had to make a pocket in the lure and put a 4oz ball lead in then drill tiny amounts out of the lead until it sank but once finished the overall weight is 4oz+ where a wooden equivelant maybe more like 3oz and far easier to work with.

mark i have some .013" ali shim i've found at work thatsideal for making templates from if you want some sending?

Edited by Mart

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I knew I have seen it somewhere I even had that sight saved in my favorites I am glad brain farts don't smell

thanks to all

:lolhuh:

Out here in SoCal, the local lumber yards sell a Malaysian hardwood for decking that is a poor man's teak. It has a smooth, even grain like Mahogany, and it is hard, and heavy, and oily. Probably perfect for sub-surface gliders.

I think one of the names it goes by is Epay, or something like that.

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Ipe is indeed an oily species, but for turning purposes, I find it has a tendency to tear. On the other hand, a few coats of Etex or equivalent would make the surface smooth again. My only concern here would be how paint or protective finish would adhere to an oily wood. Never thought of Ipe as wood to make lures, but I would surely like to test it!

Pat

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Pat,

You might try turning it slightly oversized, and then using first coarse, and then fine, sandpaper to achieve the finished size.

A coarse and fine file combination works, too, but it loads up pretty quickly, so you need a file card, or wire brush, close at hand to keep them clean enough to cut.

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I have found this foam to be problematic in that it is a bit too buoyant for these type lures,

( I only make 3"- 4" lures though), the big problem is stoking enough lead in to get the lure near neutral, you just run out of space - I would be looking a a more dense piece of wood, this way you use a lot less lead- Just my two bob's worth.pete

Pete,

Try adding Artist Sand (it comes in color) to the foam. Experiment, starting with 50/50 Foam/Sand. It will Add weight and wont compromise the structural integrity of the plug. I've been using it with UR and it works great for making the lures heavier w/o ballast.:twocents:

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Never worked with pvc but I do make alot of musky gliders and found maple or oak to be the wood that I like best. I found that alot of lead in more bouyant wood kills some of the action, just like when you over weight a crank.One thing that I found is longer the bait the wider it needs to be. shapes of the glider also is a key to making a good glide bait.Certain shapes causes different glides( meaning a long glide vs a short glide).So your favorite bait in your box glides a certain way for a reason so start there look at the shape and how it glides. Notice length and how thick a bait is and line tie on the bait. The bait should have a slow sink( I like like near neutral bouyancy ) I would stick with more dense woods to start off but like I said Ive never used pvc so thats a subject that I know nothing about.

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a friend of mine who does woodworking used some Bolivian Rosewood for a furniture project a while back and broke out in the nastiest rash i have ever seen! the doctor said it was a reaction to the oils in the wood. turns out rosewood is related to the poison oak species!

there was an article in Fine Woodworking magazine a while back warning of the problems relating to some exotic woods. you might do some internet research on whatever wood you are using to see if there have been any problems.

just a heads up.:?

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a friend of mine who does woodworking used some Bolivian Rosewood for a furniture project a while back and broke out in the nastiest rash i have ever seen! the doctor said it was a reaction to the oils in the wood. turns out rosewood is related to the poison oak species!

there was an article in Fine Woodworking magazine a while back warning of the problems relating to some exotic woods. you might do some internet research on whatever wood you are using to see if there have been any problems.

just a heads up.:?

here it is. and it was Brazilian Rosewood.

Toxic Woods - Fine Woodworking Article

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Years ago another carpenter and I spent six weeks building a black walnut bar and lounge for a judge.

I wound up with black finger tips, and a nasty rash on the back of my arms, and he had two sinus infections during the course of the job.

But the bar came out spectacular! :yay:

I haven't had any reaction to Ipe, but I've only used it as decking, and haven't tried working it for lures.

I'm pretty sure a good respirator, a hat, and washing your hands and face when you're done, will go a long way toward preventing problems.

I wear a dust mask whenever I'm machining or sanding AZEK decking into lures, and I don't have the problems I used to with my sinuses or eyes.

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Pete,

Try adding Artist Sand (it comes in color) to the foam. Experiment, starting with 50/50 Foam/Sand. It will Add weight and wont compromise the structural integrity of the plug. I've been using it with UR and it works great for making the lures heavier w/o ballast.:twocents:

Thanks Husky -I have never heard of this 'artist sand', sounds interesting though. I tried Googling it but no go - Have you got any links. Thanks again. Pete

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Would silica sand, the fine sand used in fine exterior plaster finishes work?

You can find that at a building materials supplier.

It's washed, clean, and fine, plus it's sold by the size of the sand, depnding on which size screen it passes through, so it should be uniform, mix well, and be strong.

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Would silica sand, the fine sand used in fine exterior plaster finishes work?

You can find that at a building materials supplier.

It's washed, clean, and fine, plus it's sold by the size of the sand, depnding on which size screen it passes through, so it should be uniform, mix well, and be strong.

The Artist sand is very fine, but that means that any fine sand will do. Rememver, I said I used it with UR, not foam, but I believe it will serve the same function. It's like adding sand and fine stone with cement to make concrete. It's worth a shot.BTW, I got mine in a local art store. The name is Estes Art Sand, Estesco.com

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