DanCampbell

Help with dipping

12 posts in this topic

Hello,

I'm dipping red cedar lures in flat white enamel (Base coat)and hanging them to dry. The problem is I get a thick ring of paint at the bottom of the lure. I am using a paint thinner and I'm not sure if I got it too thin or need to thin it further.

I have also put them on a turner and get thick runs in an otherwise smooth coat.

Any suggestions?

Thanks

Dan

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Next time try it straight from the can without reduction/thinning. You will always have some build up at the end where the paint drips off. Usually this isn't problematic, however, if the paint is thinned, the difference is more pronounced

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@ DanCampbell

Personally I never dipped any lures into anything , but a Finnish friend dips his lures into thinned concrete lacquer several times for a rock hard topcoat .

I had once asked him about the required consistency of that thinned stuff , ......he replied , that it should be like pee ;):lol:.

As far , as I'm concerned , the paint dip has to be thin enough to allow all drops to come down off the blank , before the paint starts to set on the lure .

On the other hand like this you might not achieve sufficient coverage with the first dipping and need to repeat one or two times(for a primer coat) .

Just my :twocents:!

Check the thread "looks that simple the Finnish way"(utilize search function to right) , there are two video links in there , ......I guess , that it is the second part , where a sequence is shown , where lure blanks are dipped in primer .

The guy there is speaking Finnish , but maybe by the looks you could figure out about the consistency to compare to your own primer dip ?

good luck , diemai:yay:

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Dan, sounds to me like you need to thin it further so all the excess drips quickly off the tail of the bait.

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I dip in to oil based primer and it sounds like to me you need to thin more. I do use a sponge brush to dab off excess from bottom about 30 mins afterwards too.

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You can run into problems when using reduced/thinned enamel. Some enamels will wrinkle if you dip several coats, especially if they have been thinned or reduced.

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I use pacience to avoid such a problem, when working with propionate solution. Thinner (the primer) is better for quicker dripping.

To avoid such a problem, keep the lure hanging down from your pliers, and when the paint does not want to drip anymore, and the ring of paint stays there, still wet, gently wipe off the excess on the lower end with some paper towel, paper napkin, or similar. Or just touch the end on the paper. BTW, I use toilet paper:)

For multiple dippings, reverse each time the lure by 180 degrees.

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If you don't have a hook hanger at the back end of the lure, put a small straight pin into it's bottom as it hangs, so the drips have something to go down, and all you'll have when it dries is a tiny pin hole to deal with.

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You gotta pack it first...helps it "soak" in! ;)

Hehe its a bad joke..yeah try thinning it down. happened to me when i first tried dipping baits in polycrylic...lots of it would bead up on the bottom of the lure. ended up actually just brushing it on.

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You can run into problems when using reduced/thinned enamel. Some enamels will wrinkle if you dip several coats, especially if they have been thinned or reduced.

never had a single issue as described above. need to thin, test, etc

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never had a single issue as described above. need to thin, test, etc

I've had the wrinkling problem when I've let a rattle can paint coat sit longer than the recommended recoat time, but not long enough to fully cure.

If you recoat during the recoat window, the two coats meld into each other, like spraying the old nitrocellulose lacquer.

I've also had wrinkling when I've redipped urethane too soon. You really need to let it set for the recommended time before you redip, or the first coat will sag under the second.

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