BassinMaumee

Single action vs dual action!?!?!?

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As a gift I just got a Paasche dual action paint brush. I have used a paasche single action b4 and I feel that it has more controll. I was using createx today for the first time, and I am having a hard time doing fine detail such as lines, stripes, dots, and meshing! What are the pros/cons of a dual action vs a single action? Also on the single action I used laquer paint!

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With your single action your AIR and Paint were being dispersed at the SAME time.

With your new dual action you are now controlling the amount AIR and Paint by how much you push down (air) and pull back (paint).

I have a dual action Iwata and my brother has a Aztec. He can do fine lines better because he has different tips that do the controlling.

But I have better control over the how the paint is applied.

Nothing wrong with using your new airbrush for coverage and your old for your detail. A lot of guys here have an AB just for detailing. I'm currently looking a getting another AB just for detailing.

Hope this helps.

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With your single action your AIR and Paint were being dispersed at the SAME time.

With your new dual action you are now controlling the amount AIR and Paint by how much you push down (air) and pull back (paint).

I have a dual action Iwata and my brother has a Aztec. He can do fine lines better because he has different tips that do the controlling.

But I have better control over the how the paint is applied.

Nothing wrong with using your new airbrush for coverage and your old for your detail. A lot of guys here have an AB just for detailing. I'm currently looking a getting another AB just for detailing.

Hope this helps.

Is water based createx harder to do fine detailing with, or is it just that I am new with the dual action? I never had a problem with the single action and laquer doing really fine lines and "shad dots" ! The gun came with size 1,3, and 5 tips! I put on the #1 and It was a lil better for fine details with the laquer, but I cant do anything with the createx other than a fan spray to cover the bait! Is there something I can add to thicken it a bit?

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Just trying to help..............I suggested the Iwata for you because the Paasche is a far inferior brush in my opinion and will only lead to many hours of frustration. I have owned two Paasche brushes and they aren't even close to an Iwata. Alot of the problems you are experiencing are because of the brush, not the paint or your technique. You can continue to fool around with the Paasche, change tips, pressure, paints, etc., and you may eventually get it to work or you can buy an Iwata, pour the createx in straight from the bottle and start painting.

Jed

Edited by RiverMan

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Regardless of namebrand, virtually all professional airbrushers use double action airbrushes all the time...whats that tell you?

I don't wanna get into an Paasche vs Iwata debate because I think its a mismatch, but I will say this....Iwata's seem to be easier for new airbrushers to get better results faster then with the Paasche's.....especially when your dealing with waterbase acrylics.....but there is no denying that a Paasche can perform equal to an Iwata in the hands of an experienced user.

I also think if your gonna compare airbrushes you need to use the same paint in both at the same time to get a true test....acrylic vs acrylic and lacquer vs lacquer.

My vote is that you spend the time learning to use your new gift.....its quite capable of doing anything you want.....with practice.....Learn basic airbrush skills....dont just assume all you do is push the button to spray paint....theres more to double action airbrush control then that.....Practice will help no matter what brand you use....Step up to a different brush when your ready.....or in some cases, "when your sick of this one".:wink:

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Your problems are NOT because of the brush, they're far more likely to be because of your technique or your paint. Water based acrylics can be tough to spray through even the best brushes because of small nozzles, but good results can be had.

Get some waste material and play with the brush. You can do so much more with the double action brush than the single. Practice only pulling the trigger backa little bit. Might be a little frustrating at first but it's worth it. You don't need to go get an Iwata, I use a $50 brush because I can afford to have 8 of them. Learn how to use the gun and you won't have problems with it. The ability to spray a very small amount of paint with the same airflow is well worth a little frustration at first.

Not familiar with the Paasche nozzle sizes, but with Createx, the bigger the nozzle, the better the results you'll have. It's just generally a thicker paint. Look at your lacquer compared to Createx, the lacquer is much thinner, and that means easier spraying.

You have MUCH more control with the dual action brush, you just have to learn to use it. There's only two cons to a dual action brush.......they take a little more time to learn to use, and cleaning is slightly more involved.

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BassinMaumee, Something I did to give me something to practice on or to try a skill out before I apply it on a crank....

I went to Lowes and bought a small/med size piece of latex/polycarbonate sheet (cost about $4) and painted one side w/ white primer. Flip it over and the primer shows through and I practice on the clear side. Practice techniques, mixing paint colors, shading, etc. When finished just wash it off and you have a clean slate to work/practice with again :)

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If you're shooting detail, keep 3 things in mind: thinner paint, closer to the surface, and lower pressure. Double action brushes shoot a cone of paint. If the brush is painting a 1" wide stripe from 2 inches away, it will paint a 1/2" stripe from 1 inch away. Using thicker paint is moving in the wrong direction because you can't get it to flow properly unless you use high pressure, and high pressure will bounce paint where you don't want it. You spent lots of hours with the single action. The double action will be a better tool when you get more hands-on time with it.

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