.dsaavedra.

Heat-Setting ?

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can someone give me some insight on heat setting?

like why do you do it?

how do you do it (i know you use a blow dryer, but what settings?)

should i do it with Wildlife Colors?

should i do it in between every coat? just before i clear?

i only heat set one bait, and when i did this my metallic silver wrinkled under the clear. i haven't heat set any other baits and they've all turned out ok.

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can someone give me some insight on heat setting?

like why do you do it?

how do you do it (i know you use a blow dryer, but what settings?)

should i do it with Wildlife Colors?

should i do it in between every coat? just before i clear?

i only heat set one bait, and when i did this my metallic silver wrinkled under the clear. i haven't heat set any other baits and they've all turned out ok.

Heat setting.. (curing) Is done after all layers of paint have dried. The heat serves as a catalyst for a cross-linking reaction in the paints binder.. ( fuses the paint together).

Do not do it between coats.. it is done after the last coat of paint is added and before clear is applied.

I would set the hair dryer on low-med depending on how well the hair dryer performs.. My wifes hair dryer can set your head on fire.

Heat setting is just to get a better bond with your paint. I am not sure about wildlife paint? Is it waterbased?

I hope I have answered all of your questions.

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thanks. my paintjob is finished now, so i guess i'll go and heat set it.

Wildlife Colors are waterbased acrylic paints.

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yeah i'll put em up in the gallery.

reason i ask is because i painted this bait and when i went to take the tape off a stripe, the paint underneath came with it!

i just heat set this paintjob and all is well. gonna clear it sometime soon.

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What do you clear with? Been looking around trying to find something for me.. I am thinking of trying devcon because it is so eas to get and cheap..

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Guys say heat setting acrylics makes a more durable skin than air drying. I don't know if that's true or not. In any event, I depend on the topcoat to make the bait durable. Nonetheless, I heat set with a hair dryer after every color until I'm sure the paint is dry. Why? Because I want to get on with painting and don't want to shoot new paint on wet paint, nor do I want to chance smearing wet paint. I also don't use tape or adhesive templates. You never know when adhesive will lift paint off a lure, no matter what precautions you take.

I'm gonna assume your silver paint wrinkled under a solvent clearcoat? If the paint was dry, I doubt it had anything to do with the acrylic paint per se. I had occasional wrinkling and bubbling problems with Dick Nite when I used a lure turner after dipping baits. If you just hang baits up to dry, all excess DN will drip off the tail of the bait and there will be no problem. Turning it doesn't allow excess to drip off - it just sloshes back and forth under the forming skin of DN and wrinkles the paint. It's one of those instances where more simple = more better.

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i use a waterborne polyurethane (superclear 9000) and i really don't know why my paint wrinkled. i was thinking earlier that it may have been because i didn't let the paint fully dry before clearing (it was the first bait i painted).

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I heat set the primer and don't heat set again unless I'm using tape for stripes or something else. If you dont heat set most solvent based clear coat products will eat the paint off the bait before you finish the first brush stroke. I generally use a blow dryer on high heat, but watch the heat after a minute or so. Get it too hot and the bait will split or deform. You can heat repaints up more than unfinished blanks. After a short time you will be able to tell the difference between heat set paint and non-set paint. I set wildlife colors the same as creatix, I'm not sure if it needs it or not, but why take the chance.

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BobP, as Frchkn said heat is the catalyst, without which certain paints like Createx won't cure.

These same paints are used on textiles such as t-shirts, and heat setting them in a clothes dryer is necessary to make them permanent so they won't wash out. Without heat setting the colors will wash out. Same deal with lures, the paint will wash off without heat setting and won't after heat setting; of course everyone uses a decent clearcoat to make them more durable than laundry needs to be...

I build my baits to take high heat, without splitting, or bubbling, which isn't hard to do--Sealing the wood with an epoxy clear coat, and using epoxy to glue in ballast, pretty much heat proofs most lures, which is not a bad idea, when you leave lures lying out on the deck bare or in a clear plastic box on 100 degree days. And as Gunnie says, it is necessary to heat set Createx to make it solvent-proof if you're clearing with a urethane such as Dicknite's, which is how I've been building mine for the last 3 years.

However I can't say about Wildlife Colors; I do know a friend of mine had some compatibility issues with a couple of clearcoats with Wildlife Colors.

Dean

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One other idea for your wrinkling may have to do with the metalic silver paint you're using.

I tried metalic paint, from a rattle can, as an undercoating before I continued with both Createx and Wildlife colors. I had the top coat split and peel in places, down to the metalic paint.

Someone here posted that the metalic paint is so slick there is no bond between it and the next layer, no matter what it is, so the top coat "floats" over the metalic paint, instead of being bonded to it.

I was able to solve that problem on some of the lures I make out of PVC decking by using just rattle can paints, with no top coat. The paint job isn't as bullet proof as if I'd used the SC 9000.

I am able to prime a lure white, let it dry for two hours, spray it with metalic aluminum (to simulate foiling, which I don't yet know how to do), let it dry only enough to allow a second coat, and then spray the top and shoulders with black. The black actually melts into the silver a little, so there's not bond problem.

I let that dry for two hours.

I then spray the top, shoulders, and sides with Krylon spray on glitter, and then top coat with Krylon UV inhibited clear. I try not to get the clear on the silver belly, or that will dull the shine.

If you still want to use metalic paint and SC 9000, try spraying on a coat of Krylon clear while the metalic is still recoatable. That might help you adhesion problem, but I'm pretty sure you'll lose the silvery shine the paint by itself has.

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