Kris

Devcon 2T and Dicks Nite pics ?

37 posts in this topic

Please expand on why it's unsuitable. TIA

That's why I asked how it compares to the UC Seal Coat which is also a water-based coating. I tried the Seal Coat, still have a gallon of it left and it is no where near tough enough, not even close.

RM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's what whittler said about target topcoats:

The latest rage on a few sites are Target Coatings, they make an interior and a exterior, water based coating. They are very easy to apply, very little waste with quick cure times. If you are coating baits to set inside on a shelf they would be great but if your are going to use them for fishing, good luck. I have been working with this stuff since Feb. both on some test blocks and about a dozen finished baits. All the test pieces are painted with waterbased paints and are not touched with bare fingers after painting. Each has three total dips done from 2hrs. to 24hrs. between dips and allowed to cure for 72hrs. before being exposed to water. Held under water for 1 day it looks unchanged, 2 days it starts to get slightly cloudy and by a week it is almost white and starting to peel. The bait pictured is typical of what can be expected. Three small bass and 30mins. of casting and this is the result.http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m178/whittler1/mypictures0234.jpg
In the original post I said that all the baits and the test blocks were given a minium of 72hrs. cure time. The bait pictured had almost 3 weeks cure time before they were fished.

I have both EM9300 Ext. Clear and EM 9000 Super Clear and I could use the same picture to cover both materials. I do have some cabinets in my shop that I think it will work just fine for so its not a total waste.

If it only took three small bass to do that kind of damage to that lure, I would not want target topcoats anywhere near my lures.

Hope this helps.

Ben

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Here's what whittler said about target topcoats:

If it only took three small bass to do that kind of damage to that lure, I would not want target topcoats anywhere near my lures.

Hope this helps.

Ben

I've seen that happen with epoxy TC's too. The TC usually doesn't cause the paint to lift when it fails, but peels off first then ther paint takes it's turn. How long did the paint set and was the paint compatible with a Water Based TC?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, from the bassresource.com post, IMO it was fairly done and he put time and effort into it. From the pic included, the Target poly eventually took on water, as did the acrylic paint under it, and it all delaminated from the lure. The only ?? I have is the lure was allowed to soak for days. In real world use, crankbaits are immersed repeatedly but for short periods as they are fished, taken out of the water to be re-cast, and then sit on deck while running to another spot, etc. Would that make a difference? I don't know!

At least one builder here on TU uses Target 9000 on swimbaits and reports no complaints from customers. We need to be very specific about finishes. How they are applied, on top of which intermediate coatings, cure times, and how they are fished, all may be important in understanding how they last or why they fail.

I have some 9300 in the garage. I used it to topcoat a wooden sign painted with acrylics in my auntie's yard, to get a rough idea of how it holds up. I'm gonna HAVE to use it on some crankbaits to see for myself how it does eventually.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To answer your question Bob, 3 days is the longest I soaked any test blocks and the baits pictured were never in the water until the day they were fished. The baits used had been finished 3 weeks prior to use.

On the test blocks after 3 days in the water you could rub the finish off with your finger.

I did a similar post on Surftalk, because there were several posts about the Target coatings and how fantastic they were, and I asked the simple question " what am I doing wrong". After 2 days there were no responses. Easy to apply, completely agree nothing is more trouble free to use, but I would not sign my name to any bait using it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have used both the DN and the Target. In a real world test I did 3 dips with the target coating and let it cure for 5 days, took the lure to the lake and the clear lasted about 30 minutes before it started to peel. I normally do 2 or 3 dips with DN and let it cure for 5 days and fish the lures and can hardly tell they have been fished it is much much stronger than the target.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks guys! Your tests showed me that I won't have to waste the time trying it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't had any peeling experiences with the SC 9000. I use it over Createx and Wildlife water based paints, and also over rattle can paints, like spray on Krylon Glitter.

But I've never immersed one of my lures in water for any length of time. I've fished them all day, and never had a problem.

I used to have problems when I used epoxy over wood lures. Water always seemed to find it's way in, eventually, and start the top coat and paint scheme lifting.

I never had that problem with plastic bait repaints, either.

I'm wondering if the issue is water penetration.

I have only used SC 9000 on one wooden bait, a one piece glider, made from Paulowinia (thanks Gene) that I soaked in Minwax Wood Hardener first, before I primed it. I wet sanded the primer, after each of the two coats I gave it.

So far, no problems, even after a few stripers.

But I wouldn't use wood if I were making musky lures. It's too soft, no matter what I've tried to make it harder.

I really think PVC is the key, because it's totally water proof, so the performance of the top coat isn't critical in terms of keeping water out.

I have to share a funny story.

Talk about making things more complicated than they need to be......

Last winter, when we arrived at the lake I wanted to fish, it was blown out, and the lifeguards wouldn't let us launch our boat.

So my buddy and I walked the dam, throwing swimbaits.

He was throwing one of the first surface gliders I had ever made, which was four years old. It was made out of old douglas fir, salvaged from a jobsite, and painted and sealed totally with rattle can paints, over a Minwax Polyacrylic sealer.

He hung the lure on a buoy rope on a long cast, and had to break it off. It was frustrating, seeing it floating there on the rope, and not being able to go get it.

The next week we went back to the lake, launched, and, with the lifeguard's permission, went into the buoyed area looking for the lure.

We found it, cut the trebles to get it free, and saved it.

When we checked it out later that day, the finish was perfect, even after being in the lake a week.

It's back in service.

So old, oil-based paints are really great, too. :worship:

I have been making some 4" four piece swimbaits and one piece walking baits out of PVC, and painting them totally with rattle cans.

I love that I can do the priming and painting completely in one day, and fish it the next day if I want to.

I've found that, if I let the white primer dry for two hours, I can spray on the simple, silver or white base coat, and then, within 15 minutes, spray on a shoulder and back layer, and it bonds into the base coat, and dries hard.I originally left the top coat off because I didn't want to lose the shiny silver finish from the spray on aluminum paint.

I actually did a crackle finish by mistake, when I used gloss white for the basecoat, and then sprayed a light black on the back and shoulders almost immediately. The black crackled, exposing the white, but it still dried hard. Dumb luck.

For someone like me, who likes immediate gratification, it's ideal. :yay:

And I can test new lures and basic paint schemes so much faster, and then duplicate them with a more complicated paint scheme, covered by SC 9000, for production.

Edited by mark poulson

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm wanting to try DN also. How long does it really take to dry? and are you better off to dip your lure or brush on DN?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jlester, The solvent in DN flashes off after application and it dries to the touch in a couple of hours. But the real deal is that it begins to cure when exposed to humidity in the air and slowly becomes harder and tougher. How long? It probably varies according to heat/humidity levels but I let mine cure for a few days before fishing them. A week is probably optimum. Application - you can dip, brush or spray it. I get good results from a single dip on bass baits and figure it gets the max possible DN on the lure in one operation. Others brush it on in several coats. Some thin it and shoot it in an airbrush. One thing I've discovered with dipping, it's best just to simply hang the bait up to dry/cure versus putting it on a lure rotator. So for me, dipping is a nice "5 second finish" - dip it, hang it, done. Check out the numerous posts about handling and storing DN before you start. It is sensitive to humidity contamination during storage and application and requires "special handling".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now